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What was the reaction when O'Malley Died?

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  • What was the reaction when O'Malley Died?

    Just curious how everyone reacted when it happened? Parties in the streets? Toasts in bars? Or just smiles among the faithful.

  • #2
    As a matter of fact, I was on the left coast the day he passed into the hereafter most likely to descend to hell where he belonged....all I saw were the shows glorifying the crimes he committed.

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    • #3
      Walter O'Malley's death

      Any man's death diminishes me.
      you can take the Dodgers out of Brooklyn, but you can't take the Brooklyn out of the DODGERS
      http://brooklyndodgermemories.freeforums.org/

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      • #4
        For those who are intertested, the date was August 9, 1979.

        c.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by penncentralpete View Post
          Any man's death diminishes me.
          Friends:

          True, but not in equal measure!
          Spirit of '55:cap:

          "Let's Bring The Dodgers Home Before The Big Quake, Else The Fault Will Be Ours!"

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          • #6
            Originally posted by penncentralpete View Post
            Any man's death diminishes me.
            I am familiar with John Donne, and I can see how his words might move an early 17th-century reader, but I have never understood how each man's death diminishes me. When a terrorist blows himself up, for example, his death does not diminish me. When Hitler died in the bunker, his death did not diminish me. When Stalin died, I was in no way diminished. And when Mao Tse Tung died, I did not feel as if an important part of me had died. When Kennedy died, I did feel diminished, but I am now just sorry, not diminished. When I have to put one of my pets to sleep, that has a diminishing effect on me because I have never met a cat or a dog or a rabbit that was not more noble than a human.

            As for O'Malley, it is absurd to think that the death of this person in any way diminishes anybody. It was O'Malley's life, not his death, that had a diminishing effect, and that diminishing effect was on O'Malley himself, nobody else. What he did in life was not exemplary. Consequently, his fall was not from a great height despite what those who voted him into a sham HOF might think.

            How did his death affect the universe? That's an easy one. How did it affect Brooklyn? Not at all. How did his life affect Brooklyn? Catastrophically.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by donzblock View Post
              I am familiar with John Donne, and I can see how his words might move an early 17th-century reader, but I have never understood how each man's death diminishes me. When a terrorist blows himself up, for example, his death does not diminish me. When Hitler died in the bunker, his death did not diminish me. When Stalin died, I was in no way diminished. And when Mao Tse Tung died, I did not feel as if an important part of me had died. When Kennedy died, I did feel diminished, but I am now just sorry, not diminished. When I have to put one of my pets to sleep, that has a diminishing effect on me because I have never met a cat or a dog or a rabbit that was not more noble than a human.

              As for O'Malley, it is absurd to think that the death of this person in any way diminishes anybody. It was O'Malley's life, not his death, that had a diminishing effect, and that diminishing effect was on O'Malley himself, nobody else. What he did in life was not exemplary. Consequently, his fall was not from a great height despite what those who voted him into a sham HOF might think.

              How did his death affect the universe? That's an easy one. How did it affect Brooklyn? Not at all. How did his life affect Brooklyn? Catastrophically.
              Friends:

              Recall the rest of John Donne's quote: "No man is an island." Even the death of a terrorist or a Hitler takes a unique viewpoint from the world---they are still people, of a sort (I self-censor in saying what sort). That loss can be seen, philosophically at least, as a diminishment. That being said, I stand by my corollary---"But not in equal measure."

              Consider this (which Donne did not, but Donzblock and I did): "Every man's death diminishes me, but some men's lives diminish the world." [aka Hitler, Stalin, O'Malley.]---two bullets, three villains, O'Malley, twice.
              Spirit of '55:cap:

              "Let's Bring The Dodgers Home Before The Big Quake, Else The Fault Will Be Ours!"

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              • #8
                It can always be said that only a real BROOKLYN DODGER FAN can find words to express the feelings of all real BROOKLYN DODGER FANS.

                Matha, Pete, Professor, and So'55, you have done US proud, by hitting the nail on the head. :gt

                A great big BROOKLYN thank you!

                c.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by DODGER DEB View Post
                  For those who are intertested, the date was August 9, 1979.

                  c.
                  Five years to the day after Richard Nixon's resignation became effective, FWIW. Interesting coincidence.....or maybe not a coincidence????
                  I will not assimilate into the Angelos Collective. Resistance is not futile.

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                  • #10
                    I came home from work and my dad, God rest his soul, was working in our little Brooklyn garden. I told him that O'Malley died and he looked up at me and said just one word: Good............He later told me he wouldve said worse but neighbors were around.

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