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Jackie Robinson honored on 61st anniversary of his MLB debut

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  • Jackie Robinson honored on 61st anniversary of his MLB debut

    April 15th, 1947 was the very fortunate day. Many baseball players of color have since greatly benefitted by getting a chance to play that otherwise may not have been granted had such a wonderful and humble human being not been the one to first step forth and do such a mighty chore.

    The United States of America also greatly benefitted, since it saw a great man of pride, courage, conviction in his own abilities, and one who was sincerely decent for all to see. Please let us share the beauty of his career, the eloquence of his widow, Rachel Robinson, and everything about him on that very eventful day in US and baseball history.

    I'll just add a few links throughout the week, but as I've said in another April 15th thread a few years ago, that fateful day was, as said by Neil Armstrong, "One Small Step for Man; One Giant Leap for Mankind".

    http://www.nydailynews.com/sports/ba...robinson_.html (gallery of 9 photos)


    Rachel Robinson (c.), widow of Jackie Robinson, joins Mets owner Fred Wilpon (l.) and
    his son Jeff Wilpon as the Mets unveil designs for the Jackie Robinson Rotunda at
    Citi Field.
    Please read Baseball Fever Policy and Forum FAQ before posting. 2007-11 CBA
    Rest very peacefully, John “Buck” O'Neil (1911-2006) & Philip Francis “Scooter” Rizzuto (1917-2007)
    THE BROOKLYN DODGERS - 1890 thru 1957
    Montreal Expos 1969 - 2004

  • #2
    Sorry for the long delay. Here's a very nice link from mlb.com, which has many great links inside, all about Jackie's Big day on April 15th.

    http://mlb.mlb.com/mlb/events/jrd/index.jsp?year=08


    Rachel Robinson speaks during a pregame
    ceremony honoring Jackie Robinson at
    Shea Stadium. (Jim McIsaac/Getty Images)


    Robinson's legacy celebrated at Shea
    DuPuy: Jackie Robinson Day celebration will continue to grow

    NEW YORK -- They celebrated the 61st anniversary of the day Jackie Robinson forever shattered Major League Baseball's color barrier on Tuesday night before the Mets played the Nationals at Shea Stadium.

    And then both teams took the field -- all of the players, managers and coaches -- wearing Robinson's legendary No. 42. The sight was both jarring and exhilarating at the same time.

    The act, in itself -- repeated by many at the 14 other ballparks where Major League games were played on Tuesday -- was proof enough of the commitment to keep Robinson's memory alive, said MLB's second-ranking official.

    "The significance of Jackie Robinson Day is not lost on anyone," said Bob DuPuy, MLB's president and chief operating officer. "As more and more people realize what April 15 means, not only for baseball, but for our country in general, I think you're going to see the celebration grow annually."
    Robinson's impact felt league-wide
    Several players weigh in on the difference No. 42 made to them

    Putting into words what Jackie Robinson means has been a welcome challenge for 61 years and counting now, for people in and beyond baseball. It's an evolutionary conversation that has gone from curiosity to admiration to outright celebration.

    For some, there's really only one word that suffices anymore to describe what Robinson means.

    "To me, he means everything," Indians ace and reigning American League Cy Young Award winner C.C. Sabathia said. "I wouldn't get a chance to play for this game if it wasn't for him. He means so much to so many people, but he means everything to me because, without him, I wouldn't get this opportunity.

    Rachel Robinson created a non-profit
    organization in honor of her husband, Jackie.
    (Jeff Zelvansky/MLB.com)


    Robinson's wife a guiding light
    Founder of legend's foundation talks exclusively with MLB.com

    NEW YORK -- Rachel Robinson sits near the desk in a spacious corner office now inhabited by the foundation that bears her famous husband's name.

    Stacked on ceiling-to-floor shelves that cover the far wall are books, largely written about Jackie Robinson, and various awards. The picture window offers a view two floors below to Varrick Street, which was once a warehouse district in Manhattan's lower west side.

    The foundation was established 35 years ago, a year after Jackie Robinson died from complications of diabetes at the age of 53. On the eve of the 61st anniversary of Robinson shattering the sport's racial barrier when he took the field for the Brooklyn Dodgers, she is asked to define the inspiration behind founding the non-profit entity.

    "Education," she tells MLB.com during a rare and wide-ranging interview, "because I feel, and all of the founders felt, that education is the key to a decent and full life. If we're talking about developing leaders, we have to educate them. We see the results, because they're tangible. These children come to us as raw material and leave us ready to take positions in society."
    Please read Baseball Fever Policy and Forum FAQ before posting. 2007-11 CBA
    Rest very peacefully, John “Buck” O'Neil (1911-2006) & Philip Francis “Scooter” Rizzuto (1917-2007)
    THE BROOKLYN DODGERS - 1890 thru 1957
    Montreal Expos 1969 - 2004

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