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Hypthetical Question - What if the Giants had Stayed

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  • #16
    Originally posted by MATHA531 View Post
    But in theory, we had a Commissioner a clown named Ford C. Frick who was charged to act in the best interests of baseball and of course there is no question that the theft of the Brooklyn franchise was not in the best interests of baseball (as later events clearly showed)......

    But this cretin told the fans, "No big deal. They'll be Yankee fans."
    As I said before, put O'Malley's HOF plaque between Ford Frick and Warren Giles.
    Let's Go Mets!
    New York Mets fan since 1962

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    • #17
      Originally posted by MATHA531 View Post

      But this cretin told the fans, "No big deal. They'll be Yankee fans."
      That's funny. In 1958, I tried to become a Yankee fan, and it lasted for just three weeks. It was like drinking Cod Liver oil. For me, it would have been easier rooting for the Giants had they stayed.

      Fifty years later, look how crazy Walter O'Malley has made me. Whereas I probably would have been a lifelong Brooklyn Dodger fan, I now root for the New York Mets, New York Yankees (huh?), and Staten Island Yankees.

      The only team not on that list is the Brooklyn Cyclones. Maybe that means I should hate them. Do I? Not really, but I still do HATE Walter O'Malley!

      May his Hall of Fame plaque fall and break, and shatter into a million pieces.
      Last edited by Let's Go Mets!; 07-15-2008, 12:06 PM.
      Let's Go Mets!
      New York Mets fan since 1962

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      • #18
        Originally posted by six4three View Post
        And there would have been a certain percentage of Dodger fans who still felt that way
        "If mankind minus one were of one opinion, then mankind is no more justified in silencing the one than the one-had he the power-would be in silencing mankind." John Stuart Mill

        six4three: may I call you joe,johnny,frank? you seem to have gone declarative on us with your above articulation, differing a bit from the previous "I suspect." may I be bold enough to ask whether you were a Brooklyn Dodger fan in the 1950s? whether you attended many Dodger/Giant games in either Ebbets Field or the Polo Grounds? if so, I find your opinion strange in that, having experienced the year round animosity that existed between fans of the two teams you still posit the possibility of a Brooklyn Dodger fan transferring allegiance upon the departure of the team. if you were not around in the 1950s, I think it may partially explain your position but I would be interested in how you arrived at your now strong stance that indeed, "there would have been a certain percentage of Dodger fans who still felt this way."

        believe me, I am in no way questioning your right to your position on the subject. I think Mr. Mill is absolutely correct in his assertion of singular opinion. in fact, I may be the patron saint of the "I've been wrong but never uncertain" school of thinking (cue the board's greek chorus for a rousing "you got that right"). I'm simply curious at how you arrived your stance: through personal experience, printed word, or conversations with Dodger fans who secretly dressed in Giant garb behind locked doors or in the marshes out near Floyd Bennett Field.
        After 1957, it seemed like we would never laugh again. Of course, we did. Its just that we were never young again.

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        • #19
          Horace Stoneham was a poor business man. The Giants if managed properly could have been profitable. The perfect solution in 1957 was to let the Dodgers build at Atlantic Avenue and let Moses build a stadium in Flushing and put both Giants teams there.

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