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WHAT was OUR MOST INCREDIBLE MOMENT?

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  • WHAT was OUR MOST INCREDIBLE MOMENT?

    Save both APRIL 15, 1947 and OCTOBER 4, 1955, what would YOU say was OUR MOST INCREDIBLE MOMENT, during the years 1947 through 1957?

    Granted WE had MANY GREAT MOMENTS, but which one stands out in YOUR mind as the "BEST of the BEST" in OUR HISTORY?

    c.

  • #2
    I'd say 4/15/47. Which other team took that chance and ran with it?

    Granted that 10/4/55 was also great from your viewpoint (not mine, I'll admit) , but still, given that it was your first and only WS win, and against you-know-who, but if you were to trade one for the other, which would it be?

    If I were a Brooklyn Dodger fan, I'd like to think I'd take Jackie's signing. Of course, I can't pretend to speak for the Bums fans here, so I'll quietly await further comment from you all.
    Please read Baseball Fever Policy and Forum FAQ before posting. 2007-11 CBA
    Rest very peacefully, John “Buck” O'Neil (1911-2006) & Philip Francis “Scooter” Rizzuto (1917-2007)
    THE BROOKLYN DODGERS - 1890 thru 1957
    Montreal Expos 1969 - 2004

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    • #3
      Originally posted by DODGER DEB
      Save both APRIL 15, 1947 and OCTOBER 4, 1955, what would YOU say was OUR MOST INCREDIBLE MOMENT, during the years 1947 through 1957?

      Granted WE had MANY GREAT MOMENTS, but which one stands out in YOUR mind as the "BEST of the BEST" in OUR HISTORY?

      c.
      Save the two you mentioned...

      Without question, 9/30/51.
      At Philadelphia.
      Jackie saves the day.
      Twice.

      A close second would be 10/3/47.
      Two out, bottom of the ninth.
      Lavagetto.
      Pandemonium.

      Comment


      • #4
        Good ones, especially that Sunday night in the darkness of Shibe Park; Robinson parallel to the ground to make the play in the ninth inning and then the extra inning home run to win it.

        But memorable? Give me three days later; the Dodgers experience what is, arguably, the toughest loss in the history of the game, after having watched a big lead dissolve in the last six weeks of the season and then, incredibly, watching a two run lead go missing in the ninth inning of the final playoff game.

        Then, instead of indulging in pity or talking about rebuilding or pointing fingers, this wonderful team, in the next four years, comes back to win three pennants, and does something the franchise had never done in it's history.

        So you want a memorable day that epitomizes the spirit of the Brooklyn Dodgers, give me October 3, 1951; that spirit, that drive, that never-give-up attitude that was the Brooklyn Dodgers was sorely tested in October, 1951, but it was much too strong to break, having started on April 15, 1947 when Jackie Robinson trotted out to play first base and culminated on October 4, 1955 when Pee Wee Reese made one more perfect peg to Gil Hodges.
        Last edited by The Real McCoy; 07-15-2004, 12:16 PM.
        After 1957, it seemed like we would never laugh again. Of course, we did. Its just that we were never young again.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by The Real McCoy
          Good ones, especially that Sunday night in the darkness of Shibe Park; Robinson parallel to the ground to make the play in the ninth inning and then the extra inning home run to win it.

          But memorable? Give me three days later; the Dodgers experience what is, arguably, the toughest loss in the history of the game, after having watched a big lead dissolve in the last six weeks of the season and then, incredibly, watching a two run lead go missing in the ninth inning of the final playoff game.

          Then, instead of indulging in pity or talking about rebuilding or pointing fingers, this wonderful team, in the next four years, comes back to win three pennants, and does something the franchise had never done in it's history.

          So you want a memorable day that epitomizes the spirit of the Brooklyn Dodgers, give me October 3, 1951; that spirit, that drive, that never-give-up attitude that was the Brooklyn Dodgers was sorely tested in October, 1951, but it was much too strong to break, having started on April 15, 1947 when Jackie Robinson trotted out to play first base and culminated on October 4, 1955 when Pee Wee Reese made one more perfect peg to Gil Hodges.
          Wonderful observation about the grit and fortitude of the team that is often overshadowed by the trauma of Oct. 3, 1951.

          Minor correction: In that memorable game in Philadelphia, Jackie made his game-saving catch in the 13th inning and his game-winning home run in his very next at-bat in the 14th.

          It doesn't change the essence of the story, but it does make it a bit more heroic and dramatic.

          Comment


          • #6
            Thanks for the correction, which is considerably more than minor; I certainly should know the inning in which, possibly, the greatest defensive play in the history of the team was made (well, maybe Sandy Amoros in Yankee Stadium was as good).

            But, as I think I may have mentioned before, I left the game around the eighth inning to go play a basketball game at a "Y" (I remember the location because I had a pretty good shot from the corner and there is no "Y" in America where you can shoot from the corner. I also remember hearing about the end of the Dodger game from my dad as he leaned over the railing on the running track above the basketball court).

            Let me attempt to extract myself from the land of TMI, by stipulating that even had I stayed and watched the game, I make it even money I still don't remember the inning that Robinson makes the play..... in fact, it's 6-5 against that I can tell you what I had for breakfast, yesterday.

            Thanks.
            After 1957, it seemed like we would never laugh again. Of course, we did. Its just that we were never young again.

            Comment


            • #7
              One game that jumps out because of the very high stakes, the way the game ended, and the historical significance was Game # 6 of the 1956 World Series, which the Dodgers beat the Yankees 1-0 in 10 innings. Hence, setting up a Game # 7 .

              This turned out to be Jackie Robinson's final RBI of his historic and epic career. Sadly, this was the final World Series game win for the Dodgers, both in Ebbets Field and altogether, in the franchise's 68 year history in the National League.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by D6+ View Post
                One game that jumps out because of the very high stakes, the way the game ended, and the historical significance was Game # 6 of the 1956 World Series, which the Dodgers beat the Yankees 1-0 in 10 innings. Hence, setting up a Game # 7 .

                This turned out to be Jackie Robinson's final RBI of his historic and epic career. Sadly, this was the final World Series game win for the Dodgers, both in Ebbets Field and altogether, in the franchise's 68 year history in the National League.
                I agree, D6+.

                But, let's also not forget that OUR star reliever, CLEM LABINE, in one of his rare starts, pitched one absolutely incredible game that day. I know, because I was there and saw it. That #41/#42 punch gave US all WE needed that day. :applaud: :applaud: :applaud:

                As the red banner headline in the old NY Journal American stated the next day:

                "Turley, He Spun Aspirin all day.....but, CLEM, HE GAVE 'EM MORE RELIEF!!"

                c.

                Comment


                • #9
                  If we're talking "incredible"--October 3, 1951.

                  http://www.baseball-almanac.com/boxscore/10031951.shtml

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by musial6 View Post
                    If we're talking "incredible"--October 3, 1951.

                    http://www.baseball-almanac.com/boxscore/10031951.shtml


                    ......albeit with an asterisk* for cheating!

                    c.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      I'd say either 15 April 1947 and 4 October 1955, two memorable moments by the Dodgers. My grandfather was a huge baseball Giants fan before they moved in 1958. I don't know what team my great grandfather was, but I think those two dates I mentioned are significant.

                      Does anyone remember the 1941 Subway Series? I thought that was a great moment getting in the World Series, but...the Yankees dispatched the Dodgers.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by DODGER DEB View Post
                        I agree, D6+.

                        But, let's also not forget that OUR star reliever, CLEM LABINE, in one of his rare starts, pitched one absolutely incredible game that day. I know, because I was there and saw it. That #41/#42 punch gave US all WE needed that day. :applaud: :applaud: :applaud:

                        As the red banner headline in the old NY Journal American stated the next day:

                        "Turley, He Spun Aspirin all day.....but, CLEM, HE GAVE 'EM MORE RELIEF!!"

                        c.

                        DODGER DEB, excellent point about the impact that Clem Labine had in Game # 6 of the 1956 World Series. It was remarkable that Clem Labine was able to pitch 10 innings of shutout ball in such an important game, against a team of the Yankees caliber. Arguably, one of baseball's greatest single game accomplishments. I'm glad you had the opportunity to witness this outstanding performance and of course Jackie Robinson's final RBI. In many ways, if not all ways, this was the last great moment in the history of the Dodgers.


                        The question that comes to mind is do you recall why the Dodgers decided to call on Clem Labine to start Game # 6 of the World Series? One thing for sure, the decision turned out to be an outstanding one. At least it gave the Dodgers a change to play in a Game # 7.
                        Last edited by D6+; 07-22-2007, 06:21 PM.

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                        • #13
                          game six in '56 was GREAT! the nun (sister sourpuss) would not allow any radios turned on in my 6th grade classroom. i watched the final 6 innings of this game a block away. after the final bell sounded, i sprinted to a hardware store i minute from my school building, arriving as my bums were hitting in the bottom of the 4th inning. i couldn't chance running the 35 extra blocks to my house (i might've missed something). i still have the newspaper my dad brought home that night. the front page headline in big, bold black lettering says: DODGERS EVEN SERIES, with the line-score above the herald. the next day really depressed me as johnny f#$%&ng kucks throttled the dodger bats. we scored ONE run, total, in the final 3 games!!! i blamed it all on my 6th grade teacher.........that sister sourpuss. pete
                          you can take the Dodgers out of Brooklyn, but you can't take the Brooklyn out of the DODGERS
                          http://brooklyndodgermemories.freeforums.org/

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by penncentralpete View Post
                            game six in '56 was GREAT! the nun (sister sourpuss) would not allow any radios turned on in my 6th grade classroom. i watched the final 6 innings of this game a block away. after the final bell sounded, i sprinted to a hardware store i minute from my school building, arriving as my bums were hitting in the bottom of the 4th inning. i couldn't chance running the 35 extra blocks to my house (i might've missed something). i still have the newspaper my dad brought home that night. the front page headline in big, bold black lettering says: DODGERS EVEN SERIES, with the line-score above the herald. the next day really depressed me as johnny f#$%&ng kucks throttled the dodger bats. we scored ONE run, total, in the final 3 games!!! i blamed it all on my 6th grade teacher.........that sister sourpuss. pete

                            What you mentioned reminds me of a young Dodgers fan in the " Ghosts of Flatbush" documentary. That boy, along with the rest of the people in his 8th Grade class, were unable to watch the first 6 innings of Game 7 of the 1955 World Series because a Nun was punishing them for something. Unlike yourself though a year later, that boy ran home to catch the rest of the game. Knowing the way I think, under the circumstance I would have done exactly what you did, not wanting to miss any more of the game.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by D6+ View Post
                              DODGER DEB, excellent point about the impact that Clem Labine had in Game # 6 of the 1956 World Series. It was remarkable that Clem Labine was able to pitch 10 innings of shutout ball in such an important game, against a team of the Yankees caliber. Arguably, one of baseball's greatest single game accomplishments. I'm glad you had the opportunity to witness this outstanding performance and of course Jackie Robinson's final RBI. In many ways, if not all ways, this was the last great moment in the history of the Dodgers.


                              The question that comes to mind is do you recall why the Dodgers decided to call on Clem Labine to start Game # 6 of the World Series? One thing for sure, the decision turned out to be an outstanding one. At least it gave the Dodgers a change to play in a Game # 7.
                              When I read this post of yours, D6+, I started to think about it, and I couldn't recall there being any circumstances that lead Alston to starting CLEM for Game 6 of the 1956 WS. So, this AM, I went to some of my scrapbooks and started reading.

                              There was no special reason for Alston starting CLEM. Read more...

                              The Woonsocket Call (CLEM's hometown newspaper) of course covered the game and had a lengthy article about his incredible win. This is part of what was written:

                              "What did manager Walt Alston think of Clem's performance?"

                              "He's been our bread and butter boy for two seasons. Every time we were in a spot in the late innings it was Clem I always relied on, and he seldom failed me. You know I threw him in against Pittsburgh on the next to the last day of the season in a game we just had to win. He didn't let me down. It was do or die today, and Labine who has the courage of a lion and a rubber arm was my logical choice. Again he came through, to prove he's one of the greatest clutch pitchers in baseball."

                              Catcher Roy Campanella who has caught Labine in countless games claimed the crew-cut righty from Rhode Island was never better. "He's done some great relief work for us over the year, but he's never been stronger over the route. He murdered them with curve balls and sinkers."


                              So, there you have it, D6+, Alston just needed a pither he could count on to win. That pitcher was OUR prime reliever, CLEM LABINE!

                              C.
                              Last edited by DODGER DEB; 07-24-2007, 04:07 AM.

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