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Growing up in BROOKLYN!

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  • Growing up in BROOKLYN!

    While I know this story has nothing to do with baseball, it does have all to do with BROOKLYN (Coney Island) and that most definitely connects it to US and growing up in BROOKLYN.

    The NY Daily News is reporting that we will start seeing Organ Grinders (some with live monkeys) this year, once again, at Coney Island. Read more....

    http://www.nydailynews.com/front/sto...p-340574c.html

    Does anyone remember seeing them at Coney Island?

    c.

  • #2
    I have to question the opening sentence of that article which says, "Mayor LaGuardia banned them 70 years ago..." because I recall seeing them on the streets of BROOKLYN in the mid to late 1940s. Unless, of course, it was a law that wasn't strickly enforced by our local boys in blue.

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    • #3
      Originally posted by Bklyn Boy since 1936
      I have to question the opening sentence of that article which says, "Mayor LaGuardia banned them 70 years ago..." because I recall seeing them on the streets of BROOKLYN in the mid to late 1940s. Unless, of course, it was a law that wasn't strickly enforced by our local boys in blue.
      From what I understand, and I'm by no means an expert, organ grinding continued on for years after La Guardia first refused to issue licenses in 1935.

      Five grinders were arrested and 334 warnings were issued in 1949.

      Here's a story from the New York Times on January 11, 1936:

      Last edited by runningshoes; 03-24-2006, 01:05 AM.
      "I think about baseball when I wake up in the morning. I think about it all day and I dream about it at night. The only time I don't think about it is when I'm playing it."
      Carl Yastrzemski

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      • #4
        Here's a reminiscent story from April, 1951.


        "I think about baseball when I wake up in the morning. I think about it all day and I dream about it at night. The only time I don't think about it is when I'm playing it."
        Carl Yastrzemski

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        • #5
          In their recent posts on other threads here both Dodger Deb and The Real McCoy have showered me (all right - sprinkled me) with undeserved praise. Judge McCoy seems not to recall that my memory is a tad less reliable than his own, so that his trivia questions should be directed elsewhere. As for Dodger Deb, I vow that I possess no knowledge of where the buried treasure of Ebbets Field seats is located, though I am told that Cal Abrams left a worn and tattered hand-drawn map among his artifacts pointing to something labeled "E.F.S." No one attached any value to it at the time. Who knows? It may be somewhere in the Rotunda now. I'll ask Voydock the next time I go.

          From speculation to fact: The last organ grinder in the city was my neighbor Phil Forelli's father, Joe, who performed under the name Dassizzi Donati in Little Italy and on the Staten Island Ferry. With the blessing of New York's Finest he continued well after LaGuardia's decree was on the books. When his ongoing presence became conspicuous, he studied the city's law with unusual care (translated into Italian for him by the famous Gennaro Fontanarosa) and realized that he would be within his rights - not to mention an even greater attraction - if he held the cup and his monkey played the organ. The simple act of turning the handle was taught to the monkey within a week, and while the cap and jacket were a tight fit on Joe, that became part of the act, too. It's all in the newspapers of the day. Joe last performed in 1951 and is fondly remembered by those of us who were there.
          pb::

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          • #6
            Dassizzi Donati is mentioned in the Times article in post #4.

            That's the only article that came up in a search of his name in The Times.
            "I think about baseball when I wake up in the morning. I think about it all day and I dream about it at night. The only time I don't think about it is when I'm playing it."
            Carl Yastrzemski

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by jaykay
              In their recent posts on other threads here both Dodger Deb and The Real McCoy have showered me (all right - sprinkled me) with undeserved praise. Judge McCoy seems not to recall that my memory is a tad less reliable than his own, so that his trivia questions should be directed elsewhere. As for Dodger Deb, I vow that I possess no knowledge of where the buried treasure of Ebbets Field seats is located, though I am told that Cal Abrams left a worn and tattered hand-drawn map among his artifacts pointing to something labeled "E.F.S." No one attached any value to it at the time. Who knows? It may be somewhere in the Rotunda now. I'll ask Voydock the next time I go.

              From speculation to fact: The last organ grinder in the city was my neighbor Phil Forelli's father, Joe, who performed under the name Dassizzi Donati in Little Italy and on the Staten Island Ferry. With the blessing of New York's Finest he continued well after LaGuardia's decree was on the books. When his ongoing presence became conspicuous, he studied the city's law with unusual care (translated into Italian for him by the famous Gennaro Fontanarosa) and realized that he would be within his rights - not to mention an even greater attraction - if he held the cup and his monkey played the organ. The simple act of turning the handle was taught to the monkey within a week, and while the cap and jacket were a tight fit on Joe, that became part of the act, too. It's all in the newspapers of the day. Joe last performed in 1951 and is fondly remembered by those of us who were there.
              You mean to tell us with your hotline to Jerry Stern you can't find out if what Cal told me is true that the seats are under the Brooklyn Bridge.
              Lets support Gil Hodges for The Hall of Fame, a true Hall of Famer.

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              • #8
                What Cal needed was a map to home plate at Ebbets Field.
                Lets get Eddie Basinski elected to the Polish Sports Hall of Fame.
                www.brooklyndodgermemories.com

                Comment


                • #9
                  Growing up in BROOKLYN!

                  Originally posted by tonypug
                  What Cal needed was a map to home plate at Ebbets Field.
                  Stop picking on Cal, when he finally got the chance to play he averaged near or above .280 for 4 years. Alot of good players were stuck behind better players in Brooklyn and when they were traded they finally bloomed into the player the Dodgers signed. If you're thinking about 1950 and the play at the plate it was all Milt Stock's fault. Duke hit a sharp single to center Ashburn picked it up right behind second base even with Ashburns weak arm anyone even me or you could throw out anyone at home on that play.
                  Last edited by kramer_47; 03-25-2006, 06:18 PM.
                  Lets support Gil Hodges for The Hall of Fame, a true Hall of Famer.

                  Comment

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