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The Jackie Robinson Thread

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  • The Jackie Robinson Thread

    I'll be putting up interesting stories I find about Jackie while I'm browsing around the newspapers.

    Feel free to comment on anything I post.

    I'll start off with Jackie's debut on April 15, 1947 at Ebbets Field.

    I'll let the pictures speak for themselves in most of my posts.
    Last edited by runningshoes; 03-24-2006, 01:37 AM.
    "I think about baseball when I wake up in the morning. I think about it all day and I dream about it at night. The only time I don't think about it is when I'm playing it."
    Carl Yastrzemski

  • #2
    "I think about baseball when I wake up in the morning. I think about it all day and I dream about it at night. The only time I don't think about it is when I'm playing it."
    Carl Yastrzemski

    Comment


    • #3

      "I think about baseball when I wake up in the morning. I think about it all day and I dream about it at night. The only time I don't think about it is when I'm playing it."
      Carl Yastrzemski

      Comment


      • #4
        "I think about baseball when I wake up in the morning. I think about it all day and I dream about it at night. The only time I don't think about it is when I'm playing it."
        Carl Yastrzemski

        Comment


        • #5
          Jackie's first ejection: August 24, 1948 in Pittsburgh




          From The Sporting News Septemer 1, 1948
          "I think about baseball when I wake up in the morning. I think about it all day and I dream about it at night. The only time I don't think about it is when I'm playing it."
          Carl Yastrzemski

          Comment


          • #6
            April 16, 1947

            From The Times

            http://www.ajclay.com/BBF_PDF/Jackie%20debut%201947.pdf
            "I think about baseball when I wake up in the morning. I think about it all day and I dream about it at night. The only time I don't think about it is when I'm playing it."
            Carl Yastrzemski

            Comment


            • #7

              It may surprise some people to learn that Jackie Robinson's first game at Ebbets Field in 1947 came not as a Brooklyn Dodger but as a Montreal Royal. Robinson came North with Montreal in April of 1947 to take part in a six game exhibition series with the Dodgers in Brooklyn. The exhibition series was the brainchild of Branch Rickey, who wanted the Dodger players to see Robinson first hand; to see how good he really was and make them understand that they needed Robinson on the team to compete for the pennant. The ploy worked perfectly, as Robinson batted .634 against Dodgers pitching in the series. On April 11th, five days prior to the regular season, the Dodgers purchased Robinson from Montreal, thus ushering in a new era in Major League baseball. This glorious photo captures Robinson, as a member of the Royals, at Ebbets field during that exhibition series. Robinson obviously had no trouble winning over these young Brooklyn fans, as they are practically climbing over one another to obtain his autograph

              (photo and caption from mastronet.com)

              Comment


              • #8
                December 19, 1956

                Jackie mulls over moving to the Polo Grounds.

                http://www.ajclay.com/BBF_PDF/jackie-giants.pdf
                "I think about baseball when I wake up in the morning. I think about it all day and I dream about it at night. The only time I don't think about it is when I'm playing it."
                Carl Yastrzemski

                Comment


                • #9
                  For the record, runningshoes, OUR JACKIE had too much pride and dignity to allow himself to be insulted by the likes of the "Big O" by actually considering this ridiculous trade to the NY Giants.

                  c.

                  Comment


                  • #10

                    (ebay)

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      I'm not sure if this has been brought up before. To the many of you with direct memories, how do you account for Jackie's dropoff in his last couple of years? Although not drastic, it was noticeable.

                      * Was it a simple function of age (he was 36 in 1955 and 37 in '56)?
                      * Was it wear and tear from his playing style?
                      * Was it less than peak conditioning? The fact is, he was carrying a good deal around the middle there later on.

                      It was probably a combo of all of these things. But had the whole Giants business not taken place, how much longer do you think he could have been a productive player?

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        R&R Auctions has a typed statement from Ed Stevens for auction saying how the Dodgers moived Ed out in order to make room for Jackie Robinson. Part of the statement is:


                        : “I was replaced in 1947 by Jackie Robinson on the Dodgers. My story’s never been told on that…. Mr. Rickey told me if I’d go back to Montreal and make room for Jackie Robinson and have myself a good year, that he would shake my hand in a gentleman’s agreement that he would bring me back as soon as I got to hittin’ good and got myself in shape—to give him a chance to get rid of Eddie Stanky, move Jackie Robinson to second base and I had a job for the next 10, 15 years, as long as my ability would allow me…. Bein’ 21 years old and nobody to talk for you, nobody to represent you—they just told you what to do and that was it…. He didn’t take my job, they gave it to him.”


                        Now Ed was never a star first baseman. He began his career with the Dodgers in 1945. He appeared in five games with the Dodgers in 1947, but was sold to Pittsburgh after the season. After partial seasons with the Pirates in 1949 and 1950, he retired with a career batting average of .252, 28 home runs, and a 193 RBI over six seasons.

                        Go to R&Rauctions.com and look for Lot #1657

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by VIBaseball
                          I'm not sure if this has been brought up before. To the many of you with direct memories, how do you account for Jackie's dropoff in his last couple of years? Although not drastic, it was noticeable.

                          * Was it a simple function of age (he was 36 in 1955 and 37 in '56)?
                          * Was it wear and tear from his playing style?
                          * Was it less than peak conditioning? The fact is, he was carrying a good deal around the middle there later on.

                          It was probably a combo of all of these things. But had the whole Giants business not taken place, how much longer do you think he could have been a productive player?
                          I'd guess that age and wear and tear played a role. Wasn't he also suffering from the onset of diabetes?

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Many people forget that OUR JACKIE was 28 years old when he first came to BROOKLYN in 1947. He played so hard, both mentally and physically, that, in my mind, I don't know how he lasted as long as he did and continued to be so effective.

                            OUR JACKIE was as tough as they come; he never gave up on anything. He would find more ways to beat you; that incredible mind of his was always turned on to the possibilities. Never give him an inch, or a blink, because he would take full advantage of it, especially on the bases, where he was wonder to behold day after day. After 10 years that has to take it toll.

                            OUR JACKIE did have diabetes, among other things, which eventually took a real toll on him. When I last saw him (alive), at Gil Hodges' funeral in April 1972, he could hardly see. THAT tore at OUR hearts. I can only imagine how difficult it was for him.

                            Today, April 15, 2006, WE celebrate that 59th year of OUR JACKIE and Branch Rickey's triumph into MLB and American history. Rachel Robinson will be at Shea Stadium this afternoon for the rememberance. WE all know that OUR JACKIE'S #42 was retired in 1997 by MLB, save one who thinks he is bigger than OUR JACKIE by continuing to wear his #42. This coming from a team that had to be dragged, kicking and screaming, to the table in 1955, eight years after 1947, to integrate their team, and help save their NY face!

                            c.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by DODGER DEB
                              For the record, runningshoes, OUR JACKIE had too much pride and dignity to allow himself to be insulted by the likes of the "Big O" by actually considering this ridiculous trade to the NY Giants.

                              c.
                              Let's be fair--I read in one of Jackie's more recent biographies that he had said that he did not want to leave New York for any other team, but would consider playing for the Giants.

                              Comment

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