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RED BARBER Adds to OUR BROOKLYN HISTORY

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  • RED BARBER Adds to OUR BROOKLYN HISTORY

    The NY Times has this story today...and it's content, is a real find for OUR BROOKLYN DODGER HISTORY.

    http://www.nytimes.com/2008/12/23/sp..._r=1&th&emc=th

    In June 1938, Johnny Vander Meer pitched back to back no-hitters, which were not broastcast, for reasons mentioned in the piece.

    RED BARBER, the year before he started to work for BROOKLYN, did however recreate the call of Vander Meer's second no-hitter...and a cassette of his voice calling this game has now surfaced. THIS is a real find!

    c.

  • #2
    That article did a great job giving a sense of how Barber could convey drama without histrionics or boring catchphrases. I wish I could have listened to him in real life.

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    • #3
      Originally posted by VIBaseball View Post
      That article did a great job giving a sense of how Barber could convey drama without histrionics or boring catchphrases. I wish I could have listened to him in real life.



      Your wish is granted.

      To be sure, these are only clips, but a short clip of Barber is worth hours of anybody else.

      Here's the Old Red Head at his best, especially his call of the last play of the most exciting game ever played at Ebbets Field:

      http://www.thedeadballera.com/Gionfriddo.mp3

      http://www.thedeadballera.com/LavagettoBevens.mp3

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      • #4
        Originally posted by VIBaseball View Post
        That article did a great job giving a sense of how Barber could convey drama without histrionics or boring catchphrases. I wish I could have listened to him in real life.
        I am glad you enjoyed it, VIB....and on your Birthday, yet. Along with shlevine's gift, a real treat for you.

        Have a wonderful birthday, with many happy returns.

        c.

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        • #5
          Wow, that was something. For my money Red Barber was always the announcer that Vin Sculley wanted to be.
          Buck O'Neil: The Monarch of Baseball

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          • #6
            Scully's great in his own way(s)..............
            you can take the Dodgers out of Brooklyn, but you can't take the Brooklyn out of the DODGERS
            http://brooklyndodgermemories.freeforums.org/

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            • #7
              My late mother grew up a Brooklyn fan and said that of course Vin is the greatest of his time, but, she would say, "If you think he's great, you should have heard his teacher." The tape isn't Red Barber at his best, but that's due to circumstance. At his best, only Vin comes near him.

              I emailed Richard Sandomir to thank him for the article. Three minor points. One, it was AFTER the no-hitter that Red changed the phone listing to his wife's name because everyone in Cincinnati called to tell him about it. Two, I think that Red toured around town that winter recreating the ninth inning. So, think about it: what he did in 1979 may have been to recreate a performance he hadn't given in 41 years.

              And that brings me to the third point, which relates to the first paragraph. Maybe the greatest baseball books ever were The Fireside Book(s) of Baseball. Charlie Einstein, the editor, said the only negative mail he ever got from readers was letters saying he MUST have edited Scully's call of Koufax's perfect game because no broadcaster could be that great ad-lib. But Scully was, and is. So was Red.

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              • #8
                Hello Michael: Red Barber and Vince Scully, were and are, the greatest baseball announcers of all time, IMHO. Don't get me wrong.........Ernie Harwell, Jack (NOT Joe) Buck, Mel Allen, Russ Hodges, and Bob Prince were also very, very good, and yes, exceptional in their own right. Realizing this is an extremely subjective opinion, I believe I'm right.
                you can take the Dodgers out of Brooklyn, but you can't take the Brooklyn out of the DODGERS
                http://brooklyndodgermemories.freeforums.org/

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                • #9
                  One of my favorite Red Barber calls was when he was at the end, broadcasting for the Yankees (yikes!). Clete Boyer made an impossible play on a grounder down the 3rd baseline, and from his one knee threw a perfect strike to first to nip the runner...............Red let you watch it (TV game), and when it was completed, Barber drawled: "we-llllllll...Mr. Boyah"
                  you can take the Dodgers out of Brooklyn, but you can't take the Brooklyn out of the DODGERS
                  http://brooklyndodgermemories.freeforums.org/

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                  • #10
                    Yes it is Zig.....and have a great holiday...Happy New Year with good health.
                    you can take the Dodgers out of Brooklyn, but you can't take the Brooklyn out of the DODGERS
                    http://brooklyndodgermemories.freeforums.org/

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by DODGER DEB View Post
                      I am glad you enjoyed it, VIB....and on your Birthday, yet. Along with shlevine's gift, a real treat for you.

                      Have a wonderful birthday, with many happy returns.

                      c.
                      Nice to return today and find this little bonus...thanks, folks. The Lavagetto-Bevens call was a great complement to the Barber clip I had heard previously, the Gionfriddo call. I bet there's more for the digging.

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                      • #12
                        Thanks, Penn Central Pete. I agree--there's Red and Vin (or Vin and Red!) and then everybody else.

                        I think it was on the 40th anniversary of that horrible day in 1951 that Bob Costas, on his syndicated radio show, aired something that hadn't been heard in 40 years. It was RED's call of the Thomson home run. It was horrible to listen to, but it also was great because it was Red. And he was silent for a full minute afterward, not because he was crying, as every Brooklyn Dodger fan was (I wasn't around back then but I would have been, too!), but because he knew the crowd noise told the story.

                        Also, Red's call of the play by Clete Boyer reminds me of his story about the 61st homer by Maris. Someone had offered $5,000 (imagine the cost today) of the baseball. When Maris hit the homer, Red just said, "That's 61 and 5,000."

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                        • #13
                          Thanks, Dodger Deb. I remember the Friday morning NPR segments with Bob Edwards and Red Barber. Red was retired, tending his garden and talking about his azaleas or whatever.

                          The 1979 audio clip is brilliant. I'd think that Red had it rehearsed, but he made it sound as if it was happening then and there. Beautiful -- I loved it.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Careful, K.G. Camellias!

                            I loved Colonel Bob's story of how he would hear, on the non-broadcast line, Red click his stopwatch as the segment began and after they signed off. One time they had a technical problem in the middle and Red couldn't hear what Bob was saying, so he just kept going and signed off right on time, with Edwards smiling to himself about the old pro showing how it's done. Which Red did, all the time.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Here is a link to a news story about a layoff at NPR:

                              http://www.nytimes.com/2008/12/29/bu.../29levine.html

                              I put it here because all of us owe Ketzel Levine a great debt. She was the sports producer for NPR's "Morning Edition" in the late 1970s and had to prepare a story. She got in touch with a semi-retired baseball broadcaster in Florida and that began the process that led to Red appearing each Friday with Bob Edwards. He wrote about it in Fridays With Red.

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