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Former Brooklyn Dodger Bobby Bragan passes away

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  • Former Brooklyn Dodger Bobby Bragan passes away

    http://www.star-telegram.com/sports/story/1913140.html

    He played for the Brooklyn Dodgers from 1943 to 1944 and from 1947-1948. In 202 games with the team, he hit .258.

  • #2
    RIP. Another Brook leaves the pond, so few left now...
    unknown brooklyn cabbie " how are the brooks doin"
    unknown fan "good they got three men on base"
    unknown brooklyn cabbie "which one?"

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    • #3
      Bragan was one of the signers of the petition against Jackie Robinson that led to Eddie Stanky and Dixie Walker, among others, leaving the team. Bragan quickly changed his mind and attended Branch Rickey's funeral, giving the immortal comment that he came because Branch Rickey made him a better man.

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      • #4
        Another one bites the dust. RIP.
        Buck O'Neil: The Monarch of Baseball

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        • #5
          rest in peace Bobby Bragan.

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          • #6
            Wonderfulk story of tolerance despite your up bringing.

            From the McGee's book The Greates Ballpar Ever:

            "Some of the ballplayers didn't seem to mind the idea of having a black team mate, but I sure did."
            Bragan recalled.
            Growing up in Birmingham, Alabama, never mixed much with blacks."

            After an exchange between him a Rickey in which he assures him of playing hard for the Dodgers everyday despite his disapproval he went on to say:

            I learned. Not fast but I learned."

            In fairness to others withing a month everybody was fighting to sit next to Jackie on the train, because he'd earned such respect for his playing ability and dignity to deal with a tough situation."

            He sat next to Jackie at Branch Rickey's funeral.

            :lightbulb:
            We live, we learn, and we adjust for error as we go along.

            Thank you for sharing this with McGee as such admissions couldn't have been easy to make, but it taught us a great lesson, Mr Bragan. May you rest in peace.
            :lightbulb:Definition of a homerun: When the baseball gets hit to a DISTANCE that the fielder cannot get it into homeplate before the batter rounds the bases.

            Associated Press -- Citi Field's smaller dimensions helped opponents more than the New York Mets.
            Thanks Sandy Alderson.

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            • #7
              My other associations of Bobby Bragan as a Dodger are trivia from the '47 Series. Dan Bankhead pinch-ran for Bragan in Game Six after the catcher's double off Joe Page put the Dodgers ahead to stay. But it took Al Gionfriddo's famous catch to hold that lead. Bragan, who was then in the Dodger's bullpen, was the closest Brooklyn eyewitness to the catch.

              After his Dodger days, of course, he was a great manager. What many may not know was that some his earliest successful managing was done in the Cuban winter league.

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              • #8
                My friend Cholly Naranjo played under Bragan both in Cuba and in Pittsburgh and had nothing but high praise for him.
                Baseball Happenings
                - Linking baseball's past, present and future.
                http://baseballhappenings.blogspot.com

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                • #9
                  Bragan also managed the Milwaukee Braves and, when he took over, told Hank Aaron that he was as great a player as Willie Mays but got less attention, which was fine. But he said he'd watched him and knew he was a great runner, so he should steal. Aaron later said Bragan made him a complete ballplayer.

                  Bragan's relationship with Jackie Robinson didn't get enough attention in the obituaries. Maybe it was too much information for reporters to handle, or too subtle. But it's a beautiful story. Bragan even said that Mr. Rickey admired him for his honesty.

                  Two stories I remember about Bragan. One, not too favorable. Jocko Conlan said Bragan once accused him of calling a pitch that would lead to a walk so that his team would lose a game. Conlan said as much as he went at it with Durocher, Leo never questioned his integrity, and he resented Bragan doing that.

                  The Bragan story I prefer is probably untrue. He was a minor league manager and supposedly Mr. Rickey sent a telegram asking which pitcher could help the Dodgers, Erskine or Palica (I think it was those two). Bragan wired back, "Yes." Mr. Rickey was a bit puzzled and replied, "Yes, what?" Bragan wired back, "Yes, sir."

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                  • #10
                    My favorite Bragan story- and it's true. When he was managing the Pirates, during a game in '56 or '57- I can't remember which- the Pirates were involved in a tight game and a call went against them. Bragan came out of the dugout to argue the call. He sauntered out, carrying a carton of- I think- Remer's Blennd, which was a popular orange-lemon drink back then in the Western PA. area. He's out there, sipping on his Blennd and arguing with the umpire. Never saw that before and I'm pretty sure I'll never see it again.

                    Another memory of Bragan, who I felt was a pretty decent manager. He may have blown it on this one, though. In the Summer of '56, Bragan's first year managing the Pirates, the Pirates brought Bill Mazeroski up. Maz was only 19, but his glove was already legendary in the Minors. The Pirates, who were a young, rebuilding team just ending a long string of last place finishes, put Maz in the lineup right away. Well, his glove sparkled like fine crystal but his bat looked like it was made of lead. He couldn't get a hit, and didn't look good trying. He was hitting around or even below .200 after about a month. Bragan finally decided to bat him 9th, behind the pitcher. Today, of course, this strategy has some proponents and it is seen occasionally, but back then it just wasn't done. It basically was an affront to a player's masculinity. As I recall, Bragan did this for about a week or two and Maz did no better. However, he was enormously embarrassed and frustrated about this. The experiment finally ended, Maz went back to the 8 spot and actually began to hit fairly well the last 6 weeks or so of the season. I've heard that Maz, who is a really nice guy, always felt betrayed by Bragan because of that. I don't know if that is true or not.

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by BigRon View Post
                      My favorite Bragan story- and it's true. When he was managing the Pirates, during a game in '56 or '57- I can't remember which- the Pirates were involved in a tight game and a call went against them. Bragan came out of the dugout to argue the call. He sauntered out, carrying a carton of- I think- Remer's Blennd, which was a popular orange-lemon drink back then in the Western PA. area. He's out there, sipping on his Blennd and arguing with the umpire. Never saw that before and I'm pretty sure I'll never see it again.

                      Another memory of Bragan, who I felt was a pretty decent manager. He may have blown it on this one, though. In the Summer of '56, Bragan's first year managing the Pirates, the Pirates brought Bill Mazeroski up. Maz was only 19, but his glove was already legendary in the Minors. The Pirates, who were a young, rebuilding team just ending a long string of last place finishes, put Maz in the lineup right away. Well, his glove sparkled like fine crystal but his bat looked like it was made of lead. He couldn't get a hit, and didn't look good trying. He was hitting around or even below .200 after about a month. Bragan finally decided to bat him 9th, behind the pitcher. Today, of course, this strategy has some proponents and it is seen occasionally, but back then it just wasn't done. It basically was an affront to a player's masculinity. As I recall, Bragan did this for about a week or two and Maz did no better. However, he was enormously embarrassed and frustrated about this. The experiment finally ended, Maz went back to the 8 spot and actually began to hit fairly well the last 6 weeks or so of the season. I've heard that Maz, who is a really nice guy, always felt betrayed by Bragan because of that. I don't know if that is true or not.
                      When Bragan hit Maz 9th for a stretch in 1956, the pitcher batted SEVENTH. Hank Foiles hit 8th when Maz was 9th. Bragan might have been trying to reinvent the wheel those few weeks.
                      you can take the Dodgers out of Brooklyn, but you can't take the Brooklyn out of the DODGERS
                      http://brooklyndodgermemories.freeforums.org/

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                      • #12
                        In two of those games, Bragan batted Foiles ninth and Maz eighth.

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