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  • #16
    It seems as though the nationwide malaise over Dodgers-Yankees in the 50's is about the same as the current malaise over Phillies-Yankees. Interesting how history repeats itself.

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    • #17
      The Dodgers were pretty popular at the time, somewhat akin to the Red Sox winning the World Series in 2004. And a heck of a lot of people were happy then; Red Sox fatigue didn't kick in until a couple years later.

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      • #18
        Originally posted by Bitter Fan View Post
        The Dodgers were pretty popular at the time, somewhat akin to the Red Sox winning the World Series in 2004. And a heck of a lot of people were happy then; Red Sox fatigue didn't kick in until a couple years later.
        I don't think this was the case. Baseball wasn't on any kind of nostalgia kick in the 1950s. I don't remember any wave support for the Red Sox in the 1970s and doubt if there was any in 1967.

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        • #19
          Originally posted by EdTarbusz View Post
          I don't think this was the case. Baseball wasn't on any kind of nostalgia kick in the 1950s. I don't remember any wave support for the Red Sox in the 1970s and doubt if there was any in 1967.
          You didn't need a nostalgia kick, you just needed the major leagues sandwiched in a very small area that meant the South, the West and so forth had free reign in choosing teams to root for. The Dodgers had a radio network in the South that the Cardinals complained about for years as encroaching into "their" territory.

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          • #20
            Originally posted by Bitter Fan View Post
            You didn't need a nostalgia kick, you just needed the major leagues sandwiched in a very small area that meant the South, the West and so forth had free reign in choosing teams to root for. The Dodgers had a radio network in the South that the Cardinals complained about for years as encroaching into "their" territory.
            I think that fans in the Minor League areas in that time period were bigger fans of their local teams then some far off Major League teams

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            • #21
              Although, as Bitter Fan indicates, the Cardinals did cast a pretty wide net back then.

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              • #22
                Originally posted by EdTarbusz View Post
                There may have been millions of baseball fans in 1955 who weren't thrilled to have another New York team win the World Series.
                Sounds like "spread the wealth around".

                How about only one team in cities like NY, Chicago, and LA?
                Let's Go Mets!
                New York Mets fan since 1962

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                • #23
                  Originally posted by Let's Go Mets! View Post
                  Sounds like "spread the wealth around".

                  How about only one team in cities like NY, Chicago, and LA?
                  I think that outside of New York the Dodgers were considered as just another New York team.

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                  • #24
                    Originally posted by EdTarbusz View Post
                    I think that outside of New York the Dodgers were considered as just another New York team.
                    That's because they were. Only particular Brooklynites would disagree.
                    Last edited by Let's Go Mets!; 10-14-2010, 10:40 AM.
                    Let's Go Mets!
                    New York Mets fan since 1962

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                    • #25
                      Although something just came back to mind -- like the Cardinals (although to a lesser degree), the Dodgers had fans in other parts of the country thanks to radio.
                      One of those fans was Phillies manager Charlie Manuel, who grew up in western Virginia.

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                      • #26
                        I don't know....Bob Hunter of the Los Angeles Examiner referred to the Dodgers as."....these beloved Bums....".in his article of October 2, 1955. This is the game that Del Webb fielded Don Larsen's "nine ironed shot....with his head......"

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                        • #27
                          Originally posted by VIBaseball View Post
                          Although something just came back to mind -- like the Cardinals (although to a lesser degree), the Dodgers had fans in other parts of the country thanks to radio.
                          One of those fans was Phillies manager Charlie Manuel, who grew up in western Virginia.
                          There was a good essay in Dan Okrent's Ultimate Baseball Book by someone - can't remember who - about being from Brooklyn and in the service and meeting Dodger fans from all over the country. The idea that people didn't care is just ex post facto anti-NYism.

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                          • #28
                            Thanks for that, bitter fan. Also, thanks to Google, we can tell that essay was written by one John Leonard. He was eight years old in 1947, when the Dodgers went to the Series, and was growing up in Southern California. He identified with Jackie Robinson and said that "fans invent[ed] themselves" there at the time.

                            But here's the choice quote, which is an excellent counterpoint to Ed's view. "In October 1956...I was in college then, in Boston, surrounded by young men, scholarship boys every one of them, from places like South Dakota, Utah, and Kentucky. They were to a man Dodger fans, although they'd never even lived in Queens. It was as if there were an underground nation of social outlaws, the upwardly mobile lower-middle class, and only one team with which to identify."

                            http://books.google.com/books?id=5mH...page&q&f=false

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                            • #29
                              Originally posted by VIBaseball View Post
                              Thanks for that, bitter fan. Also, thanks to Google, we can tell that essay was written by one John Leonard. He was eight years old in 1947, when the Dodgers went to the Series, and was growing up in Southern California. He identified with Jackie Robinson and said that "fans invent[ed] themselves" there at the time.

                              But here's the choice quote, which is an excellent counterpoint to Ed's view. "In October 1956...I was in college then, in Boston, surrounded by young men, scholarship boys every one of them, from places like South Dakota, Utah, and Kentucky. They were to a man Dodger fans, although they'd never even lived in Queens. It was as if there were an underground nation of social outlaws, the upwardly mobile lower-middle class, and only one team with which to identify."

                              http://books.google.com/books?id=5mH...page&q&f=false
                              As Bitter Fan expounds......"anti-NYism"
                              Let's Go Mets!
                              New York Mets fan since 1962

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                              • #30
                                UBB is such a great book. People might disregard that essay because it's pretentious, dropping in references to Hegel and such, but it's far too funny and tongue in cheek for that.

                                The Mordechai Richler essay on Les Expos is great as well.

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