Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Ebbets Field Attendance in the later years

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Ebbets Field Attendance in the later years

    I was talking recently to someone about the Brooklyn Dodgers and he mentioned that during the last few years of the team being in Brooklyn that the yearly attendance was extremely low, averaging about 4000-5000 per game. Is this correct? How well did the fans support the team in the last few years at Brooklyn?

  • #2
    Originally posted by EasilyFound View Post
    I was talking recently to someone about the Brooklyn Dodgers and he mentioned that during the last few years of the team being in Brooklyn that the yearly attendance was extremely low, averaging about 4000-5000 per game. Is this correct? How well did the fans support the team in the last few years at Brooklyn?
    According to Baseball-Almanac, Brooklyn's attendance between 1945 and 1957 was about 16,000 per game. Over a million a year for 13 straight seasons, right up to the move, and always above the NL average.

    I think the idea of the lack of support in the later years comes from the footage of the relatively few people who showed up for their final game in Brooklyn, by which time the fans were essentially boycotting unofficially out of indifference, anger, and/or sadness.
    Put it in the books.

    Comment


    • #3
      It was a different era and different ways of determining success.

      In those days, if you drew 1,000,000 or more, it was considered fine. The Dodgers dxrew more than a million every year from 1947 through the last lame duck year of 1957. So in that sense, they were successful. They were generally in these later years finishing 2nd in NL home attendance to Milwaukee.

      Now this has to be understood also in the context that in those days, every Dodger home game was on free television (the Cubs also televised all their home games as did the Yankees and Giants, although all 3 of these shared their television outlets. Yankees and Giants for the most part only televised their home games. Brooklyn televised all home games, 2/3 of the road games excluding the 11 road games they played in New York which were televised by the Giants.

      The Dodgers also had one of the largest and most lucrative radio networks of any team in baseball so they were making money heads over heels, as a matter of fact, they were the most profitable team in baseball but of course we all know this wasn't enough for O'Malley. The franchise was hugely profitable and in no danger, not in the slightest, of not continuing to be so even if they had to stay at Ebbets Field for a few more years.

      Comment

      Ad Widget

      Collapse
      Working...
      X