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Rod Miller, Preston Ward and Andy Pafko, former Brooklyn Dodgers, pass away

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  • Rod Miller, Preston Ward and Andy Pafko, former Brooklyn Dodgers, pass away

    17-year-old Rod Miller played a single game for the Dodgers in 1957. He struck out in his only major league at-bat.

    Rodney Carter Miller Sr. died suddenly November 8, 2013 at age 73. ...

    Rod played major league baseball straight out of high school - signing w/the Brooklyn Dodgers in 1957. He had one at bat in the majors at age 17. He played in the minors for 3 years, including w/the Reno Silver Sox. He was about to join the "big" team in Los Angeles when he was drafted to the U.S. Marine Corps where he spent the next 4 years.
    Read more:

    http://www.legacy.com/obituaries/rgj...d57uiKOW.dpuf-

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    Preston Ward spent his first major league season in Brooklyn, hitting .260 with one home run and 21 RBI in 42 games. He went on to have a nine-year career at the major league level.

    There is no real article for Ward, just this:

    In Memory of
    Preston Meyer Ward
    July 24, 1927 - June 2, 2013
    http://obits.dignitymemorial.com/dig...f-a089597f30fd

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    Andy Pafko spent the latter part of 1951 and all of 1952 with the Dodgers, hitting .274 with 37 home runs and 143 RBI in his 234 games with the team. In 1952, he hit .285 with 19 home runs and 85 RBI in 150 games.

    Andy Pafko, the starting right fielder for the Milwaukee Braves until Hank Aaron arrived in the majors, died Tuesday at age 92 in a nursing home in Stevensville, Mich.

    Pafko was a Wisconsin native, born in Boyceville, who began his big-league career in 1943 with the Chicago Cubs. The five-time all-star played for the Cubs in 1945, the last year they were in the World Series.
    Read more:

    http://www.jsonline.com/blogs/sports...#ixzz2hBs554Ku

  • #2
    Thanks for the supplement to the "Where Are They Now?" thread, Cowtipper. It hadn't occurred to me before to include story links with the updates, but I think I will do so from now on. Let's hope the need does not arise again soon, though...

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    • #3
      Yeah, I do these threads because it is easier, in my opinion, for people to discuss them and share remembrances if they have any without cluttering the "Where Are they Now" type threads.

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      • #4
        I know this is very late, however, back on December 31, 1984 I named my son Preston Ward after this very great man. When I was 9 years old, a friend and I used to ride the bus from Independence, Missouri to Municipal Stadium to watch the Athletics. We would either pay the 50 cents for bleacher seats or find another way in. In the summer of 1958 Preston Ward was traded to Kansas City, along with Roger Maris and Dick Tomanek but most A's fans were not to happy as Vic Power was traded away and he really was the sparkplug. However, Mr Ward carried himself with such dignity and he played so hard, I kind of mentally decided he was idol. He was friendly and would talk to me and my friend, got us some free tickets and always had the greatest smile. At 66, I don't remember a lot of my childhood but I remember my days at the ballpark watching Preston Ward and the Athletics play. They had a bunch of guys that were actually fan friendly. Preston is now in heaven snagging groundballs and pulling down errant throws and smiling.....always smiling.

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        • #5
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          Andy Pafko had a place in baseball card history as his baseball card was designated as #1 among a 407 card, Topps 1952 set, which many experts consider the first modern baseball card set. Others would argue that the first modern set was the 1933 Goudey set and like Pafko with the 1952 Topps, the player designated as #1 in that set, Benny Bengough enjoyed a certain notoriety for having his card designated as #1 in the '33 Goudey set. Ironically Bengough, a career backup catcher did not play in the majors in 1933 or afterwards. He had played in the big leagues the 10 previous seasons (1923-1932) but failed to make a major league roster in '33. He was a seldom used reserve on the great 1927 & 1928 world's championship NY Yankees teams and got into a couple of games in the '27 series. He is also remembered as a coach on the 1950 Philadelphia Phillies, NL champion, "Whiz Kids" team.
          Pafko's fared much better in his career. He played 17 years in the big leagues (1943-1959), hit 213 home runs and batted .285 lifetime in about 1,900 games. He made five all-star teams, 1947-1950 and also was designated an all-star in 1945 for "the game that was never played". With the Cubs, Dodgers and Braves Pafko played in four World Series, and was on the winning side once, with the '57 Milwaukee Braves.

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