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  • Fassero calls it a career

    Jeff Fassero, whom I tought had been retired for years, has just announced his retirement.

    Fassero was originally signed as a free agent by the Boston Braves in the early 50's. He's now decided to hang it up, after a 35 years, 61 clubs tour of duty in the majors.

    All kidding aside, Fassero was a good pitcher for the Expos, but turned out to be quite a cry-baby near the end.

    <$CHR>Sports in brief

    <$TI>Former Expos pitcher Jeff Fassero retires

    <$LEAD>Jeff Fassero is retiring from baseball after winning 121 games over 16 major league seasons.

    The 44-year-old left-hander, cut by the San Francisco Giants in May, worked out for the Los Angeles Dodgers Feb. 2.

    "I thought I threw really well. I guess they didn't they think so," Fassero said Friday during a telephone interview. "They were the ones that showed the most interest."

    Fassero, who lives in Paradise Valley, Ariz., had started working out in August and throwing in November.

    "Probably the best shape I've been in the last few years," he said.

    He finished 121-124 with a 4.11 earned-run average and 25 saves in 242 starts and 478 relief appearances for Montreal, Seattle, Texas, Boston, the Chicago Cubs, St. Louis, Colorado, Arizona and San Francisco. He was originally signed by the Cardinals, who selected him in the 22nd round of the 1984 amateur draft.

    Fassero was 3-0 in the postseason, getting one victory for Seattle against Baltimore in the 1997 AL division series and two wins for St. Louis against Arizona in the 2002 NL division series.

    "You're never going to be satisfied. I can live with it," Fassero said. "I got to do what I wanted to do growing up for 20 years, counting minor leagues and big leagues."
    From now until the end of September, I'll be chronicling in real time on Twitter the 1946 season of the International league's Montréal Royals, when Jackie Robinson broke the color barrier in professional baseball. Check it out: https://twitter.com/Royals_46season

  • #2
    Indeed, Fassero might have been our best left-handed pitcher ever. A few numbers while he was with the Expos :

    58 W, 48 L, 3.20 ERA in 262 games, 100 of them as a starter
    Ranks 7th with 58 W and 1st among left-handers
    Ranks 9th with 3.20 ERA
    Ranks 9th with 850 IP
    Ranks 8th with 750 SO
    Ranks 2nd with 7.94 SO/9 IP

    He also threw a 2-hit shutout for the Expos on June 26th 1996 at Veterans Stadium, striking out 11 Phillies and facing only 29 batters.
    « But what's puzzlin' you is the nature of my game... »

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    • #3
      Originally posted by Chicoutimi CP
      Indeed, Fassero might have been our best left-handed pitcher ever.
      Yeah, it wasn't exactly a who's who of southpaws. The top ten left-handed Expos in career victories:

      Jeff Fassero 58
      Woodie Fryman 51
      Dan Schatzeder 37
      Chris Nabholz 34
      Ross Grimsley 32
      Joe Hesketh 29
      Carlos Perez 29
      Bill Lee 25
      Kirk Rueter 25
      Rudy May 18

      Only eleven more ever had 10 wins total.

      Comment


      • #4
        Wow, that is not a very impressive list.

        I think that Randy Johnson, despite the fact he wasn't an Expo for long, should be considered the best Expo left-hander of all.
        From now until the end of September, I'll be chronicling in real time on Twitter the 1946 season of the International league's Montréal Royals, when Jackie Robinson broke the color barrier in professional baseball. Check it out: https://twitter.com/Royals_46season

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by Augustin_"Gus"
          Fassero was originally signed as a free agent by the Boston Braves in the early 50's. He's now decided to hang it up, after a 35 years, 61 clubs tour of duty in the majors.
          Wow. They already knew that he would be a pitcher before he was even born... Must be a slip of the pen. He was born on January 5, 1963.

          Comment


          • #6
            No, I believe my data is correct... Or perhaps I'm just joking around with the fact that Jeff has had a long and very well travelled career.

            I kidd. I wish Fassero all the best. Now that he's retired, that'll clear up a lot of time in his schedule for Bingo and Shuffleboard. All the best, pal.
            From now until the end of September, I'll be chronicling in real time on Twitter the 1946 season of the International league's Montréal Royals, when Jackie Robinson broke the color barrier in professional baseball. Check it out: https://twitter.com/Royals_46season

            Comment


            • #7
              Plus more than 28,600,000 $ in salary over the last 15 years... Jeff, good luck and have fun. Have a drink on us all.
              « But what's puzzlin' you is the nature of my game... »

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by Mad Guru
                Yeah, it wasn't exactly a who's who of southpaws. The top ten left-handed Expos in career victories:

                Jeff Fassero 58
                Woodie Fryman 51
                Dan Schatzeder 37
                Chris Nabholz 34
                Ross Grimsley 32
                Joe Hesketh 29
                Carlos Perez 29
                Bill Lee 25
                Kirk Rueter 25
                Rudy May 18

                Only eleven more ever had 10 wins total.
                Wow, that shows just how fast Ross Grimsley declined. 20 wins one year. 12 in the next year and a half, and then gone. Yikes!
                Montreal Expos 1969 - 2004

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                • #9
                  Joe Hesketh was a talented pitcher, but he was stringy and brittle. I remember going to the game at the Big O where he foolishly tried to bowl over Mike Scioscia, who was an absolute rock, in a play at the plate. He broke his leg, and Scioscia said in the papers that if Hesketh had slid, he would have been safe. I'm almost certain the date was 8/23/85 -- that was the last game Joe pitched that year. He finished 10-5, 2.49.

                  A story I didn't know until trying to pinpoint that date was this one, which I found on Wikipedia:

                  8/20/1988: The Dodgers entered the bottom of the 9th at Dodger Stadium trailing the Montreal Expos 3-2. The Expos brought in Joe Hesketh to close out the game. After getting Sax out, Hesketh allowed Mickey Hatcher to double. Anderson would run for Hatcher and Kirk Gibson would single home Anderson. One out later with John Shelby at the plate, Gibson would steal second base. With John Shelby at the plate Hesketh threw a wild pitch through catcher Nelson Santovenia. Gibson would move to third but would not stop there, the former linebacker would charge toward the plate that was being covered by Hesketh. Santovenia threw back to Hesketh but Gibson beat the throw to the plate giving the Dodgers the win. Gibson would later admit that part of the reasoning for him attempting to take home was that he knew Hesketh had suffered a broken leg earlier in his career and Gibson felt he would not step in to cover the plate.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by VIBaseball View Post

                    8/20/1988: The Dodgers entered the bottom of the 9th at Dodger Stadium trailing the Montreal Expos 3-2. The Expos brought in Joe Hesketh to close out the game. After getting Sax out, Hesketh allowed Mickey Hatcher to double. Anderson would run for Hatcher and Kirk Gibson would single home Anderson. One out later with John Shelby at the plate, Gibson would steal second base. With John Shelby at the plate Hesketh threw a wild pitch through catcher Nelson Santovenia. Gibson would move to third but would not stop there, the former linebacker would charge toward the plate that was being covered by Hesketh. Santovenia threw back to Hesketh but Gibson beat the throw to the plate giving the Dodgers the win. Gibson would later admit that part of the reasoning for him attempting to take home was that he knew Hesketh had suffered a broken leg earlier in his career and Gibson felt he would not step in to cover the plate.
                    I remember watching that game and yelling at the TV ... where has the time gone? :dismay:

                    Also remember Hesketh on the Metro in '85 - he had pitched a few innings and we had left the game early to go downtown and there was today's starter sitting next to us in the subway car.
                    sigpic

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