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Giving up on your mistakes

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  • runningshoes
    replied
    The best philosophy is to not hire a former player as your general manager.

    What has Bobby Clarke really done for the Flyers? (That's rhetorical. Don't answer it.)

    How many former players were successful GM's in MLB?

    Leave a comment:


  • Yankeebiscuitfan
    Guest replied
    Originally posted by Ontarioguy
    That seems to be a common trend in New York.
    Incredible, your perception capacity.

    Leave a comment:


  • Ontarioguy
    replied
    Originally posted by yankees rule
    So that's why he's with the Mets now? It is their philosophy as well.

    I think that trading a player away three weeks after you have acquired him, is way to soon. He needs time to settle down, to get used to the new environment.

    BTW this reminds me of the Yankees...
    That seems to be a common trend in New York.

    Leave a comment:


  • Yankeebiscuitfan
    Guest replied
    Originally posted by Ontarioguy
    I think overall you need a GM that sticks with his guys. You need to build that team spirit and moving players around like cattle doesn't help that at all. Hopefully you have a good GM, who's mistakes are limited.

    Minaya had a special situation going on. He was all about 'Win this year and don't even look to the future'. He figured unless the team made the playoffs it would be moved shortly. He did all he could to make the team a winner. He said over and over that he would be proactive and he was. I suppose we can thank him for those respectable seasons in 2002 and 2003.
    So that's why he's with the Mets now? It is their philosophy as well.

    I think that trading a player away three weeks after you have acquired him, is way to soon. He needs time to settle down, to get used to the new environment.

    BTW this reminds me of the Yankees...

    Leave a comment:


  • Augustin_"Gus"
    replied
    I agree with you O-MG that Minaya's situation was special, but was Floyd given a chance a get accustomed to his (not so) new environnement in his second go around with the team? I tought Omar quit way too quickly in that case. If you got a guy in a trade, you give (especially in that case) young players to get the guy, you must give him a chance to overcome a bad start.

    But on the other hand, it's normal to make mistakes. Wether your a GM who made a bad move, a head of state that sent his troops into war ill-prepared or a girl dating a loser, sticking to it cause you don't want to admit you made a bad decision will only make things worse. Youre at risk of A) seeing the guys play deteriorate draging the team along with him, B) watching as the losses pile-up, or C) spend a significant chunk of your life with that bozo and then regretting it. So you must take a step back, have a little humility and A) send the guy packing B) take the necessary mesures so it don't turn into a disaster C) find someone else better to keep you warm.

    Only thing left to do is to set a cut-off date. After say, 3 months, if you don't produce, then I made a mistake. Youre out the door.

    Leave a comment:


  • Ontarioguy
    replied
    I think overall you need a GM that sticks with his guys. You need to build that team spirit and moving players around like cattle doesn't help that at all. Hopefully you have a good GM, who's mistakes are limited.

    Minaya had a special situation going on. He was all about 'Win this year and don't even look to the future'. He figured unless the team made the playoffs it would be moved shortly. He did all he could to make the team a winner. He said over and over that he would be proactive and he was. I suppose we can thank him for those respectable seasons in 2002 and 2003.

    Leave a comment:


  • Augustin_"Gus"
    started a topic Giving up on your mistakes

    Giving up on your mistakes

    In this wonderful city I call home, we've had two examples of different philosophies of General managing. On one hand, you've got Bob Gainey with the Canadiens, who made a bad move by getting Radek Bonk in a trade, and now that Mr. Gainey is coaching, he would play Bonk 30 minutes a game if he could despite the fact he's been arguably the worst player of the team this season. And on the other hand, we had Omar Minaya with the Expos who wasn't afraid to quit on his mistakes. He got Cliff Folyd in a trade, it didn't work, he traded him away about three weeks later. He did the same kind of thing with Bruce Chen, tough on a smaller scale.

    So the question I want to raise is this one: What is the best philosophy for a GM regarding his own trades? Sticking with a guy you delt for, even tough he's not producing, cause you saw something in him in the first place and you hope he can deliver, or do you prefer to have a GM who quickly turns around and gets rid of players he got in trades, thus admitting it was a bad decision on his part.

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