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Knickerbocker Beer And The Giants

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  • Knickerbocker Beer And The Giants

    Hello here is a old ad for knickerbocker beer for the new york giants
    Attached Files
    LONG LIVE THE POLO GROUNDS 1891-1964
    http://groups.yahoo.com/group/POLOGROUNDS1962

  • #2
    Knickerbocker Beer And The Ny Giants

    Hello here is another knickerbocker beer ad from 1957
    Attached Files
    LONG LIVE THE POLO GROUNDS 1891-1964
    http://groups.yahoo.com/group/POLOGROUNDS1962

    Comment


    • #3
      Great ads, Donald! Not baseball related but note the old steel beer can, used before the development of "pop tops". The colonial figure is holding a can opener, often cynically referred to as a "church key".

      Many a good party was ruined when someone brought the beer but forgot the opener.
      "For the Washington Senators, the worst time of the year is the baseball season." Roger Kahn

      "People ask me what I do in winter when there's no baseball. I'll tell you what I do. I stare out the window and wait for spring." Rogers Hornsby.

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      • #4
        Great old ads from when beer was beer.
        Do you ever catch today's beer advertisements?
        You don't know if they're pushing beer or condoms.

        Comment


        • #5
          Knickerbocker Beer And The Ny Giants

          Originally posted by Aa3rt
          Great ads, Donald! Not baseball related but note the old steel beer can, used before the development of "pop tops". The colonial figure is holding a can opener, often cynically referred to as a "church key".

          Many a good party was ruined when someone brought the beer but forgot the opener.
          Hello the ads are baseball related, they came from a 1956 and 1957 new york giants baseball program.in 1956 and 1957 the polo grounds clubhouse out in centerfield had a huge knickerbocker beer ad on it and the beer was sold at the polo grounds Take care Donald
          LONG LIVE THE POLO GROUNDS 1891-1964
          http://groups.yahoo.com/group/POLOGROUNDS1962

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by POLO GROUNDS 1957
            Hello the ads are baseball related, they came from a 1956 and 1957 new york giants baseball program.
            Donald, You misunderstood my point. YOUR posts are fine, my entry about the metal beer can and the "church key" were not baseball related. Art
            "For the Washington Senators, the worst time of the year is the baseball season." Roger Kahn

            "People ask me what I do in winter when there's no baseball. I'll tell you what I do. I stare out the window and wait for spring." Rogers Hornsby.

            Comment


            • #7
              Ah, variety in domestic beer. What a novel idea!
              What ever happened to "Knickerbocker?" Or "Ruppert Beer," for that matter?
              I'm sure Barry Halper has a few old Ruppert ads in his collection.
              Talk about product identification (i wonder what percentage of fans were loyal to their team's beer?)

              Giants: Knickerbocker
              Dodgers: Rheingold (later, the Mets)
              Yankee: Ballantine

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by polo54
                Ah, variety in domestic beer. What a novel idea!
                What ever happened to "Knickerbocker?" Or "Ruppert Beer," for that matter?
                I'm sure Barry Halper has a few old Ruppert ads in his collection.
                Talk about product identification (i wonder what percentage of fans were loyal to their team's beer?)

                Giants: Knickerbocker
                Dodgers: Rheingold (later, the Mets)
                Yankee: Ballantine

                In the 50's, OUR beer sponsor was SCHAEFER BEER...."the beer to have, when you're having more than one"!

                I may be wrong, but I think Knickerbocker Beer was bought out by another company.

                In NYC, the loyalty to a TEAM'S BEER SPONSOR was very high! It was just another way to proudly identify your loyalty to your team.

                c.

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                • #9
                  Lacking the colonial guy, but pretty nice anyway:
                  Attached Files

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                  • #10
                    That's right, Deb--my mistake. Schaefer, another great old name in beer, sponsored the Dodgers.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by DODGER DEB
                      In the 50's, OUR beer sponsor was SCHAEFER BEER...."the beer to have, when you're having more than one"!

                      I may be wrong, but I think Knickerbocker Beer was bought out by another company.

                      In NYC, the loyalty to a TEAM'S BEER SPONSOR was very high! It was just another way to proudly identify your loyalty to your team.

                      c.
                      The greatest beer ads directly associated with baseball were the "live" TV spots Mel Allen used to do in the fifties after Yankee games: a "two shot" of Allen and a Pilsner glass of Ballantine. Mel would read the copy, in a shirt and loosened tie, sweating profusely (this was before air conditioned broadcast booths) while looking at the glass of beer with what could be fairly described as a reverence seldom seen outside houses of worship. While he couldn't drink on the air, it was evident that once the camera went off, that beer was "going, going, gone".

                      Jim Jordan from BBDO was the guy credited with the Schaefer beer jingle. He died a couple of years ago, but that was generallly considered the best line ever created for a beer. The bookending of the word "one", "(the) ONE beer to have when you're having more than ONE" created a perfect synergy. It spoke directly to the target audience for beer; in those days, approximately 20% of the population was consuming 85% of the beer.
                      After 1957, it seemed like we would never laugh again. Of course, we did. Its just that we were never young again.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by The Real McCoy
                        The greatest beer ads directly associated with baseball were the "live" TV spots Mel Allen used to do in the fifties after Yankee games: a "two shot" of Allen and a Pilsner glass of Ballantine. Mel would read the copy, in a shirt and loosened tie, sweating profusely (this was before air conditioned broadcast booths) while looking at the glass of beer with what could be fairly described as a reverence seldom seen outside houses of worship. While he couldn't drink on the air, it was evident that once the camera went off, that beer was "going, going, gone".

                        .
                        "It's a Ballantine blast!"

                        Even though he worked for the Yankees, Mel Allen was great.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          The greatest beer ads directly associated with baseball were the "live" TV spots Mel Allen used to do in the fifties after Yankee games: a "two shot" of Allen and a Pilsner glass of Ballantine. Mel would read the copy, in a shirt and loosened tie, sweating profusely (this was before air conditioned broadcast booths) while looking at the glass of beer with what could be fairly described as a reverence seldom seen outside houses of worship. While he couldn't drink on the air, it was evident that once the camera went off, that beer was "going, going, gone".

                          I remember those ads with Mel Allen. "Purity, Body, Flavor" said Mel who unlike Connie Desmond read the ads.

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                          • #14
                            Nice memory job!

                            Purity, Body, Flavor were, of course, the famous "three rings" of Ballantine: "Make that three ring sign, Ask the man for Ballantine".

                            As for Connie Desmond, by the end of the game, Connie, most days, had difficulty reading anything.
                            After 1957, it seemed like we would never laugh again. Of course, we did. Its just that we were never young again.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              When Knickerbocker was one of the Giant sponsors, they had a contest. Fans would fill out a form at their local tavern and it would be submitted to the brewery. During Giant home games usually Russ Hodges would say "Have a Knick you'll feel refreshed." A musical jingle would start "Each home game the Giants play someone wins a prize that day." Hodges would than read the winner. Knickerbocker produced a "Bock Beer" during the summer months. Rheingold also produced "bock beer" during the summer. It was a little bit heavier and darker in color than the regular beer. It was a regular amongst the partisans who imbibed on the stoop with a six pack to listen to the Giants. Quite often during the summer if one were to stroll through the neighborhoods of New York, some group of fans had their refreshments and you would hear Russ Hodges, Red Barber or Mel Allen on the radio. You could literally walk through some neighborhoods and know the scores for each of the three teams. The hot summer nights on the stoop with liquid refreshment listening to your favorite team - life was about as good as it could get.
                              Last edited by GIANT; 05-28-2005, 12:51 PM.

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