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  • #31
    Take The Tour

    Unfortunately, that painting gallery that contains many former Athletics srars paintings is in such an exclusive section that the average fan will never see them unless he or she takes the "stadium tour". On gamedays that gallery is off limits to all but those who can afford seats in that "hall Of fame" section. The cost is highly prohibitibve. If somebody gives up these exclusive seats for one game and sells them through Stub Hub or another ticket agency, I'm guessing you'll pay a minimum of $80 to $100 apiece for one-game seating, and season tickets can be afforded by only a lucky few.
    That's not much of a tribute to the Phila. Athletics as most fans will never see those paintings and only a small percentage of fans are even aware of their existance.

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    • #32
      The Phillies still honor the A's existence in Philadelphia. In addition to the statue of Connie Mack in front of the ballpark there is a Wall of Fame section that includes the history of Philadelphia baseball to include Phillies and A's players from the early 1900's in the outfield concourse. On the second level of the stadium in the Hall of Fame Club there are several photos of prominient A's and Phillies players and of course Connie Mack (pictured with Babe Ruth) and oil paintings of hometown heroes of the likes of Tommy Lasorda and Reggie Jackson. The Phillies have done a first class job in keeping the memories of Connie Mack and his A's preserved!

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      • #33
        Unfortunately many baseball fans have no concept of their team's history. Every Friday evening, the Reds have a game during their pre-game show whereby fans are asked questions to win prizes. If you can answer four consecutive questions, you receive two tickets to a Reds' game. I am amazed that few people know trivia questions on their favorite franchise from ten years ago. If you dip back into the 60's and 70's with questions, most people have no clue. It is sad how little information that people know about their team's history.

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        • #34
          Originally posted by bummy davis View Post
          The Phillies still honor the A's existence in Philadelphia. In addition to the statue of Connie Mack in front of the ballpark there is a Wall of Fame section that includes the history of Philadelphia baseball to include Phillies and A's players from the early 1900's in the outfield concourse. On the second level of the stadium in the Hall of Fame Club there are several photos of prominient A's and Phillies players and of course Connie Mack (pictured with Babe Ruth) and oil paintings of hometown heroes of the likes of Tommy Lasorda and Reggie Jackson. The Phillies have done a first class job in keeping the memories of Connie Mack and his A's preserved!
          I'd still have to argue that the current Phillies' management/ownership removed the plaques of all Athletics from the Philadelphia Of Wall Of Fame when the Phillies moved to their new home in 2004. The plaques of those Athletics elected between 1978 and 2003 were given to the Philadelphia Athletics Historical Society & Museum and Athletics elections to "The Wall" were discontinued at that point.
          It fell to a few die-hard Athletics fans, who founded the A's Historical Society, most of whom were no more than 12 years old when the Athletics played their last season in Philadelphia 55 years ago, to keep the memory of that franchise alive and to pay it a proper tribute.
          The Phillies' management and ownership has done more to bury the memory of their American League counterparts in the City Of Brotherly Love than to preserve it.
          -philliesfiend55-

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          • #35
            Originally posted by EdTarbusz View Post
            Why? Sisler has no history in Baltimore. Just like Grove, Foxx et al have no history in Oakland.
            I agree. Those great players from the Philadelphia A's played in Philly, and represented the city and region as much as they represented the team. Even though the franchise technically still exists, it should be treated like a separated organization, IMO. The A's have done a nice job establishing their own history in Oakland. The great players like Grove and Foxx played in and represented Philadelphia.

            As a Philadelphia-area resident, i present this hypothetical. Let's say the Red Sox franchise moved to Philadelphia and became the Philadelphia Red Sox. Should Philly start erecting statues of Ted Williams? I say no, because Ted Williams means more to Boston than Philly.

            Also, if the Phillies moved to New Orleans, I would be pretty ticked off if New Orleans started honoring former greats like Mike Schmidt and Richie Ashburn. Those players played in, and played for, the city and region of Philadelphia.

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            • #36
              Originally posted by philliesfiend55 View Post
              I'd still have to argue that the current Phillies' management/ownership removed the plaques of all Athletics from the Philadelphia Of Wall Of Fame when the Phillies moved to their new home in 2004. The plaques of those Athletics elected between 1978 and 2003 were given to the Philadelphia Athletics Historical Society & Museum and Athletics elections to "The Wall" were discontinued at that point.
              It fell to a few die-hard Athletics fans, who founded the A's Historical Society, most of whom were no more than 12 years old when the Athletics played their last season in Philadelphia 55 years ago, to keep the memory of that franchise alive and to pay it a proper tribute.
              The Phillies' management and ownership has done more to bury the memory of their American League counterparts in the City Of Brotherly Love than to preserve it.
              -philliesfiend55-

              Respect you opinion, but I don't necessarily think it is the Phillies responsibility to honor the Athletics. The Phillies have their own history to honor, a history that started before the Athletics even existed. It would be a nice gesture, and I love the fact that there is a small amount of A's history at CBP, but in no way is it the Phillies obligation to do so.

              Should the Yankees have special tributes to the Dodgers and Giants all around NYS? Some would argue it would be nce, but they have absolutely no obligation to do so.

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              • #37
                Originally posted by kjc15600 View Post
                Should the Yankees have special tributes to the Dodgers and Giants all around NYS? Some would argue it would be nce, but they have absolutely no obligation to do so.
                Maybe not the Yankees, but the Mets should. Unfortunately the current ownership only sees fit to remember the Brooklyn Dodgers and have pretty much given the Giants the shaft. Christy Matthewson, Mel Ott, Carl Hubbell, John McGraw, should be honored by the current New York N.L. team. It burns me to see their names hung up on an outfield wall in a city they never played in or contributed to.
                New York (N.L.)
                1888, 1889, 1904, 1905, 1911, 1912, 1913, 1917, 1921, 1922, 1923, 1924, 1933, 1936, 1937, 1951, 1954, 1969, 1973, 1986, 2000

                Brooklyn (N.L.)
                1890, 1899, 1900, 1916, 1920, 1941, 1947, 1949, 1952, 1953, 1955, 1956

                New York (A.A.) 1884 Brooklyn (A.A.) 1889

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                • #38
                  ....But succeeded with Boston and New York.

                  And he got back his old western league franchises in St. Paul and Milwaukee .. whether he liked it or not.

                  Originally posted by EdTarbusz View Post
                  The A's were the black hole of the AL at the end of the Mack family's ownership. I doubt if any AL team wanted to make the trip to Philadelphia because they were almost guarenteed to take a finacial loss for the trip.

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                  • #39
                    Originally posted by nl1899fan View Post
                    How true! One can imagine in the early 1950's how happy teams like the Yankees and Indians must have been to visit Philadelphia and St Louis-some easy wins but hardly enough money to cover the hotel bill. In retrospect, Ban Johnson's attempts to capture both cities for the AL failed but at least Philly had some of the greatest teams ever.
                    He finally got Baltimore too, even if it was in a round about way.
                    "No matter how great you were once upon a time — the years go by, and men forget,” - W. A. Phelon in Baseball Magazine in 1915. “Ross Barnes, forty years ago, was as great as Cobb or Wagner ever dared to be. Had scores been kept then as now, he would have seemed incomparably marvelous.”

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                    • #40
                      of course Ban did not want Baltimore and was quick to sacrifice it on the altar of getting New York
                      Originally posted by bluesky5 View Post
                      He finally got Baltimore too, even if it was in a round about way.

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                      • #41
                        It is hard for me to decide whether or not teams that relocate should be obligated to honor their past in other cities.

                        The Dodgers, Giants, Braves all kept the same uniforms so I think if they are going to stick with their past identity they owe it to the past players and fans of the previous city. It is their identity they are building the team on - they essentially said you've heard of the great Brooklyn, NY, Boston, now they are yours, continuing our past success here.

                        The Twins and especially the Orioles (traded 17 players after leaving St. Louis) don't show any reference to their old city. It was - we are in a new city, with a new start, we are going to be winners here. They made it pretty obvious they wanted nothing to do with the past. Even in Clark Griffiths case.

                        The Athletics are a special case. The team was taken "stolen" even if it was Mack's fault. They tried to build on the Philadelphia tradition (in terms of marketing, not acquiring talent). Changed the colors. It is the same franchise, but it isn't. The changes were big. It would be nice if the team was honored equally in both cities. But never in KC.

                        The Rangers and Brewers really have nothing to honor.

                        Remember the AL's first year they had the Milwaukee Brewers (Browns - Orioles) and the Baltimore Orioles (Yankees).

                        Don't think the Mets need to honor the Giants and Dodgers, who are in the same league! Like they do.
                        "No matter how great you were once upon a time — the years go by, and men forget,” - W. A. Phelon in Baseball Magazine in 1915. “Ross Barnes, forty years ago, was as great as Cobb or Wagner ever dared to be. Had scores been kept then as now, he would have seemed incomparably marvelous.”

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                        • #42
                          What were the main color changes, please?
                          Originally posted by bluesky5 View Post
                          The Athletics are a special case. The team was taken "stolen" even if it was Mack's fault. They tried to build on the Philadelphia tradition (in terms of marketing, not acquiring talent). Changed the colors.

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                          • #43
                            From blue and red to green, gold and white. White is kinda neutral but the A's made it about as prominent as anyone ever with the cleats.
                            "No matter how great you were once upon a time — the years go by, and men forget,” - W. A. Phelon in Baseball Magazine in 1915. “Ross Barnes, forty years ago, was as great as Cobb or Wagner ever dared to be. Had scores been kept then as now, he would have seemed incomparably marvelous.”

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                            • #44
                              I have a problem with the Twins and maybe i'm wrong but if they hoist the 1924 WS flag which I think they might do then they deff should honor the old Senators/Nationals teams. Guys like Mickey Vernon and Cecil Travis shouldnt be forgotten but to forget Walter Johnson is pretty bad. Maybe i'm wrong and if they do pay respects to Walter Johnson they dont do it as much as they should.

                              WW2 vets like Cecil Travis and Mickey Vernon both should have thier numbers retired and also be in the Hall Of Fame in my opinion. That really is a joke too me. Those two guys are too easily forgotten. I dont care about stats when it comes too WW2 vets who lost out on serving for our country.
                              Last edited by chicagowhitesox1173; 05-11-2012, 12:53 AM.
                              "(Shoeless Joe Jackson's fall from grace is one of the real tragedies of baseball. I always thought he was more sinned against than sinning." -- Connie Mack

                              "I have the ultimate respect for Whitesox fans. They were as miserable as the Cubs and Redsox fans ever were but always had the good decency to keep it to themselves. And when they finally won the World Series, they celebrated without annoying every other fan in the country."--Jim Caple, ESPN (Jan. 12, 2011)

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