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  • K.C. A's - why did Finley almost move to Dallas?

    My apologies if there's a Kansas City Athletics board I didnt' see, but I was curious, why did Charlie Finley almost move his team to Dallas? Did he want it just as a stopgap - like he did Louisville with a 2-year contract later? Was he looking at going to Oakland eventually, even if he moved to Dallas - and if so, why Oakland? Theyddidnt' have the Collisseum till 1968, I don't think; could have been '67. If another city offered him a long-term lease (not that anyone would trust him after a while) would he have taken and honored it instead?
    If Baseball Integrated Early - baseball integrated from the beginning - and "Brotherhood and baseball," the U.S. history companion, at http://www.lulu.com/spotlight/Baseballifsandmore - IBIE updated for 2011.

    "Full House Chronology" at yahoo group fullhousefreaks & fullhouse4life with help of many fans, thanks for the input

  • #2
    This book is probably the best source:

    http://www.amazon.com/Kansas-City-At.../dp/0786416106

    Here's an excerpt from one of the Amazon reviews:

    "Peterson also discusses in depth the movement of the Athletics from Kansas City to Oakland. Throughout his ownership of the A's in Kansas City Finley constantly tried to move them elsewhere. Additionally, Finley was always duplicitous about his commitment to Kansas City. Rumors circulated every year that Finley was moving the team, first to Dallas, then to Seattle, then to San Diego, then to "who knows where." Finley always publicly denied these rumors, all the while he was negotiating to move the team first to Dallas, then to Seattle, then to San Diego, then to "who knows where." By the time of the departure of Finley's A's, few mourned the loss. Missouri Senator Stuart Symington summed up the position of most Missourians about this move, "Oakland is the luckiest city since Hiroshima." Peterson has a whole chapter with this title and it gives a blow by blow account of the move."

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    • #3
      Originally posted by VIBaseball View Post
      This book is probably the best source:

      http://www.amazon.com/Kansas-City-At.../dp/0786416106

      Here's an excerpt from one of the Amazon reviews:

      "Peterson also discusses in depth the movement of the Athletics from Kansas City to Oakland. Throughout his ownership of the A's in Kansas City Finley constantly tried to move them elsewhere. Additionally, Finley was always duplicitous about his commitment to Kansas City. Rumors circulated every year that Finley was moving the team, first to Dallas, then to Seattle, then to San Diego, then to "who knows where." Finley always publicly denied these rumors, all the while he was negotiating to move the team first to Dallas, then to Seattle, then to San Diego, then to "who knows where." By the time of the departure of Finley's A's, few mourned the loss. Missouri Senator Stuart Symington summed up the position of most Missourians about this move, "Oakland is the luckiest city since Hiroshima." Peterson has a whole chapter with this title and it gives a blow by blow account of the move."
      I understand Finley resented the preferential treatment that the AFL Kansas City Chiefs got when leasing the stadium in Kansas City! The stadium owners in Kansas City were apparently not baseball fans..

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      • #4
        maybe because the Chiefs won three AFL titles, went to two superbowls,
        and destroyed the Chicago bears in their first preseaon game vs the NFL, 66-24. The A's just stunk up the joint, and served as a farm team to the NY Yankees.

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        • #5
          Finley--the people's friend

          Originally posted by DTF955 View Post
          My apologies if there's a Kansas City Athletics board I didnt' see, but I was curious, why did Charlie Finley almost move his team to Dallas? Did he want it just as a stopgap - like he did Louisville with a 2-year contract later? Was he looking at going to Oakland eventually, even if he moved to Dallas - and if so, why Oakland? Theyddidnt' have the Collisseum till 1968, I don't think; could have been '67. If another city offered him a long-term lease (not that anyone would trust him after a while) would he have taken and honored it instead?
          Charles Finley, who bought the club from the arnold estate..never could master the fine art of being friendly to anyone...unless he wanted
          something, and even then..it was so jaded...not only cities loathe him,
          his clubs hated him..including the coaching staff..and he once called
          Bowie Kuhn, the commish, the VILLAGE IDIOT....

          at one point, he wanted to move the A's to Chicago, especially when the
          WHITE SOX were making ugly noises of going to Seattle or Tampa..

          he was always looking for another city to move to...a true baseball nomad, or
          carpetbagger...i wonder if Oakland ever regrets shacking up with him...

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          • #6
            Originally posted by skeletor View Post
            at one point, he wanted to move the A's to Chicago, especially when the WHITE SOX were making ugly noises of going to Seattle or Tampa..

            he was always looking for another city to move to...a true baseball nomad, or
            carpetbagger...i wonder if Oakland ever regrets shacking up with him...
            IF I remember correctly (and it's been a lot of years since I read it) Bill Veeck detailed this in his book "Veeck, As In Wreck". This was the updated version after Veeck purchased the White Sox for a second time.

            The city of Seattle had brought a lawsuit against the American League after the Seattle Pilots were allowed to move to Milwaukee after the 1969 season.

            As skeletor has already mentioned, the White Sox were looking to move-Finley was pushing for the White Sox to move to Seattle, nullifying the lawsuit, then he planned to move the Athletics to Chicago to be close to his home and insurance business. That plan was foiled in 1976 when the American League expanded to 14 teams for the 1977 season with new franchises in Seattle & Toronto.
            "For the Washington Senators, the worst time of the year is the baseball season." Roger Kahn

            "People ask me what I do in winter when there's no baseball. I'll tell you what I do. I stare out the window and wait for spring." Rogers Hornsby.

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            • #7
              3 City Move

              I think the potential move involving Oakland, Seattle and Chicago was something like this in 1975.

              Charlie Finley moves the Oakland A's to Chicago. They become the White Sox.
              John Allyn moves the White Sox to Seattle.

              Allyn owned the White Sox between Bill Veeck's White Sox years.
              When Veeck got control of the White Sox in late 1975 he saved the team from moving to Seattle.

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              • #8
                The most insane idea Finleyhad after he was shot down on a few move attempts was the idea of building a stadium in Peculiar, Missouri, a rural outpost south of KC a good ways. Of course, the name Peculiar A's would have fit Finley to a "T".
                Buck O'Neil: The Monarch of Baseball

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by KCGHOST View Post
                  The most insane idea Finleyhad after he was shot down on a few move attempts was the idea of building a stadium in Peculiar, Missouri, a rural outpost south of KC a good ways. Of course, the name Peculiar A's would have fit Finley to a "T".
                  Oh, man, that *is* insane.

                  I wonder if - had the PIlots not moved - he might have tried to move the A's to Chicago in 1970, with Selig buying the Whit eSox. Sounds like the fellow would have done pretty much anything if it suited him at the present moment.

                  That might be mroe a scenario for if the A.L. doesn't let them move in 1967, though - I can understand their finally giving in, but it seems that if they put up with his requests for 5 years, they could have a little longer.

                  Of course, they might also have thought, "We don't want to subject the 2nd largest city in the U.S. to this man; we want to attract fans to Chicago."
                  If Baseball Integrated Early - baseball integrated from the beginning - and "Brotherhood and baseball," the U.S. history companion, at http://www.lulu.com/spotlight/Baseballifsandmore - IBIE updated for 2011.

                  "Full House Chronology" at yahoo group fullhousefreaks & fullhouse4life with help of many fans, thanks for the input

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    If one word in the English Language described Charles Oscar Finley best, it would be 'reprehensible'.

                    If you made a menagerie and filled it with plaques and momentos of the more interesting clowns and fools and criminals who've owned major league baseball clubs in the 20th century, Charlie Finley would stand out. His reign of terror lasted twenty years...

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                    • #11
                      I have read that Finley threatened one year to move the A's to Louisville. He even signed a lease on the Louisville ballpark. The AL wouldn't let him move.

                      Had Finley moved to Dallas, the A's would be one of the most solid franchises in baseball right now. They are weakened by having to share the Bay Area with the Giants, who come from the dominant city in the Bay Area
                      "I do not care if half the league strikes. Those who do it will encounter quick retribution. All will be suspended and I don't care if it wrecks the National League for five years. This is the United States of America and one citizen has as much right to play as another. The National League will go down the line with Robinson whatever the consequences. You will find if you go through with your intention that you have been guilty of complete madness."

                      NL President Ford Frick, 1947

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                      • #12
                        Wow. If Finley HAD moved to Dallas, it might've been interesting to see how he got along with the Dallas media. As it is, the Skip Baylesses of the world all seem to think that they're more important than the game, or the fans. And, Finley with his quirks, and his antics...

                        He might've wound up selling out much earlier...

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                        • #13
                          I remember a little "poem" about the subject of franchise moves from back in the early-to-mid 1960s. I may have seen it either in The Sporting News or Baseball Digest.....

                          Tigers, Tigers, burning bright
                          In the ballparks of the night
                          Soon the fans will get their fill
                          And move the team to Louisville

                          I'm sure that was a "shot" at Charlie Finley's Louisville plans at the time.

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by DTF955 View Post
                            ...Sounds like the fellow (Finley) would have done pretty much anything if it suited him at the present moment....
                            I think that the quote above sums up Charlie Finley as well as anyone ever has, or ever will.

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by mandrake View Post
                              maybe because the Chiefs won three AFL titles, went to two superbowls,
                              and destroyed the Chicago bears in their first preseaon game vs the NFL, 66-24. The A's just stunk up the joint, and served as a farm team to the NY Yankees.
                              The Vikings must have been awful in 1966. The Broncos played them in the first-ever, AFL-NFL pre-season meeting and also beat the Vikes. Granted, pre-season and all, but for the AFL it was a big deal. And the Broncos of the 60's were absolutely nothing like the franchise we've come to know from 1973 onward. They were at the bottom of the AFL for most of the 60's.

                              Anway, while the A's didn't do very well in KC, never having a record over .500, they did manage to build up a heck of a farm system and recruit some excellent prospects. The same prospects that would win world championships for them in the early 70's. It took time, in the pre-free agency floodgate days. Funny thing - the first year out of KC, the A's finally shot over .500 in 1968. Then contended for the AL West in 1969 - the first year of divisional play.

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