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  • December 19th

    On days when reporting,
    Takes shovels and digs,
    Unearthed for you here,
    ...Krichell, Koupal, and Griggs.


    :radio

    Births on December 19th


    Paul Krichell's Gravesite

    Paul Bernard "Paul" Krichell is born on December 19, 1882 in New York City. In 243 at bats as a righthanded hitting catcher for the 1911-12 Browns, Paul will complete his big league career with a BA of .222 and 0 homers. Regardless of his short stay and weak output, Krichell is another of our "at-least-I-got-here-and-what's-your-excuse" guys. We salute him for it. Paul Krichell died on June 4, 1957 in New York City at the age of 74. - Paul Kritchell is best remembered today as the famous Yankee scout who signed Lou Gehrig for the New York Yankees.

    Louis Laddie "Lou" Koupal is born on December 19, 1898 in Tabor, South Dakota. After compiling a 6-12 record as a pitcher for the Pirates, Robins (Dodgers), and Phillies from 1925 to 1930, Lou makes a comeback seven years later with the 1937 Browns. Koupal goes 4 and 9 with the '37 Browns and retires again. Lou Koupal died on December 8, 1961 in San Gabriel, CA at the age of 62.


    Deaths On December 19th

    Arthur Carle "Art" Griggs dies in Los Angeles on December 19, 1938 at the age of 55. Griggs was born on December 10, 1883 in Topeka, Kansas. As we reported several days ago, Griggs hit .280 for the 1909 Browns and .236 for the 1910 club. Over his career at several positions (1909-18), Griggs hit .277.

    Today's reference link ... http://www.todayinbaseballhistory.com/
    Last edited by Bill_McCurdy; 06-04-2005, 04:18 PM.
    "Our fans never booed us. - They wouldn't dare. - We outnumbered 'em." ... Browns Pitcher Ned Garver.

    Comment


    • December 20th

      Births on December 20th

      James Thomas "Jimmy" Williams


      "I'm not the guy you're
      reading about here."


      Jimmy (2 "M"s) Williams is born on December 20, 1876 in St. Louis. He will live to the ripe old age of 88, dying in St. Petersburg, Florida on January 16, 1965. From 1899 through 1909, Williams played 11 seasons for 4 different teams, spending his last two seasons (1908-09) as the 2nd baseman of the St. Louis Browns. Although Williams had some good previous years as a hitter, his offensive stroke was gone by the time he reached St. Louis. Jimmy's rookie year found fim batting .355 in 152 games for the 1899 Pirates. In contrast, Williams batted only .195 in 110 games for the 1909 Browns. It was time for Jimmy Williams to go - and he did.

      Wesley Branch ("The Mahatma") Rickey is born on December 20, 1881 in Flat, Ohio. Rickey will live to age ??, dying in Columbia, Missouri on December 9, 1965, (See the post of December 9th for more career information on Rickey.)

      It suffices to say that Branch Rickey gets many of our votes as the man who influenced baseball more than any other during the 20th century. His genius vision for developing a winning big league club through the development of a minor league farm club system, and, of course, his leadership in breaking the color line are at the heart of his contributions to baseball.

      Make no mistake about Rickey. He was an honest man, but his shrewdness for business and ego never strayed far from his motivations. Rickey's desire to see the color line broken was not purely motivated by some altruistic pursuilt of justice. Rickey wanted to tap into the enormous talent pool that he saw in the Negro Leagues - and he wanted to be the one who received credit for righting decades of injustice. In short, Branch Rickey was no Mother Theresa. He was more like the rest of us, laboring under the weight of our personalities and various personal shortcomings. From an intellectual standpoint, he stood apart from the rest. He was just a whole lot smarter than most of his baseball contemporaries. :atthepc

      Today's reference link ... http://www.todayinbaseballhistory.co...day/today2S.pl
      Last edited by Bill_McCurdy; 12-20-2004, 06:24 AM.
      "Our fans never booed us. - They wouldn't dare. - We outnumbered 'em." ... Browns Pitcher Ned Garver.

      Comment


      • [QUOTE=Bill_McCurdy][I]
        Paul Bernard "Paul" Krichell is born on December 19, 1882 in New York City. In 243 at bats as a righthanded hitting catcher for the 1911-12 Browns, Paul wil complete his big league career with a BA of .222 and 0 homers. Regardless of his short stay and weak output, Krichell is another of our "at-least-I-got-here-and-what's-your-excuse" guys. We salute him for it. Paul Krichell died on June 4, 1957 in New York City at the age of 74.

        QUOTE]

        Arguably the greatest scout in baseball history; working for the Yankees h from 1920 on, he brought Lou Gehrig, Whitey Ford, Tony Lazzeri, Vic Raschi, Mark Koenig, and many others to the Bronx ... they quite possibly wouldnottadunnit without him, at least not as often.

        Imagine him scouting for his old team the Brownies instead, with Branch Rickey in the Browns' front office ....

        Comment


        • Paul Krichell

          Westsidegrounds on Paul Krichell: Arguably the greatest scout in baseball history; working for the Yankees from 1920 on, he brought Lou Gehrig, Whitey Ford, Tony Lazzeri, Vic Raschi, Mark Koenig, and many others to the Bronx ... they quite possibly wouldnottadunnit without him, at least not as often.

          Imagine him scouting for his old team the Brownies instead, with Branch Rickey in the Browns' front office ....
          Thanks for bringing in the fact of Paul Krichell's incredible career as a scout for the Yankees, WSG. You're so right. The thought of what Rickey and Krichell, plus a little money, might've done together is mind-blowing. Here's an excerpt from an article about Krichell's signing of Lou Gehrig:

          Columbia's baseball team played Rutgers University on April 26, 1923. Paul Krichell, a Yankees scout, attended the game. This scout offered Lou a $1,500 dollars for signing with the team and $2,000 for the remaining four weeks of the season. Lou first began his career in 1923 playing for the Yankees at Fenway Park, where he hit his first of what would become 493 homeruns throughout his baseball career.

          article reference link ... http://www.whitehouse.gov/kids/dreamteam/lougehrig.html
          "Our fans never booed us. - They wouldn't dare. - We outnumbered 'em." ... Browns Pitcher Ned Garver.

          Comment


          • December 21st


            "People will little note nor long remember the names of many who played here, but they will not
            forget what all of these anonymous Browns did and didn't do here."


            - Abraham Ball Lincoln Veeck.



            Births on December 21st

            George James "Soldier Boy" Curry was born in Bridgeport, Connecticut on December 21, 1888. Curry's big league career was limited to 3 losing starts he made as a righthanded pitcher for the 1911 Browns. Curry passed away in West Haven, Connecticut on October 5, 1963. He was nearly 81.

            Harold Augustine "Hal" Haid was born in Barberton, Ohio on December 21, 1897. Haid made his big league debut as a righthanded pitcher for the Browns on September 5, 1919. It wasn't a banner day for young Hal. In two innings of relief work, he gave up 4 runs on 5 hits and 3 walks. He did register one strikeout before nightfall. Haid did not pitch in the majors again until 1928 when he returned as a Cardinal. From 1928-33, Haid pitched for the Cardinals, Braves, and White Sox, registering a career mark of 14-15 and an E.R.A. of 4.16. Hal Haid died in Los Angeles on August 13, 1952. He was 54.


            Deaths on December 21st

            Ralph Richard "Blackie" Schwamb died on December 21, 1989 in Los Angeles at the age of 63. Schwamb was born on August 6, 1926 in Lancaster, California. Schwamb pitched one year in the big leagues for the 1948 Browns. The 6' 5 1/2" righty went 1-1 in 12 games as a reliever/starter, registering an E.R.A. of 8.53. Schwamb never made another appearance in the majors after the 1948 season.

            today's reference link ... http://www.todayinbaseballhistory.co...day/today2S.pl
            Last edited by Bill_McCurdy; 08-13-2005, 06:34 AM.
            "Our fans never booed us. - They wouldn't dare. - We outnumbered 'em." ... Browns Pitcher Ned Garver.

            Comment


            • December 22nd

              December 22, 1953: New Name for Browns is Dunn Deal. The name Dunn had become synonymous with the franchise known as the Baltimore Orioles from prior to the days of Babe Ruth. Remember? Jack Dunn was the Baltimore Orioles owner/manager when Ruth was sold to the Boston Red Sox. Well, today that ownership association with the name "Orioles" comes to an end as Jack Dunn III, whose family successfully owned and operated the Orioles for years in the International League, officially turns the old team name over to the Baltimore Orioles. It's just another 1953 pre-Christmas reminder to St. Louis Browns fans that their club really is - no more.


              Births on December 22nd

              Owen Dennis Ignatius Shannon is born in Omaha, Nebraska on December 22, 1879. In 1903, Shannon has a 9-game career with the Browns as a catcher-1st baseman. He will go 6 for 28 and be out of the big leagues after 1903 until 1907. He returns to the big leagues with the Senators in 1907, but goes 1 for 7 before disappearing for good. Owen Shannon died on April 10, 1918 at the age of only 38.

              John George "Johnny" Bero is born on December 22, 1922 in Gary, West Virginia. After an 0 for 9 history with the 1948 Tigers, Bero has one year as a middle infielder with the 1951 Browns, going 34 for 160 for a .213 average that includes a surprising 5 homers. Like so many others before and after him, Bero passes from the big league scene after his short exposure and never returns after 1951. Bero passed away on May 11, 1985 in Gardena, California. He was 62.


              Deaths on December 22nd

              William Henry "Bill" Crouch dies on December 22, 1946 in Highland Park, Michigan at the age of 59. Lefty Crouch pitched one game in the big leagues for the Browns, giving up 4 runs (3 earned) and 6 hits in 8 innings of work on July 12, 1910. He walked 7 and struck out 2 in a solitary no-decision appearance. That was it for the big league career of Bill Crouch. Crouch was born on December 2, 1886 in Marshallton, Delaware.

              Bernard Oliver "Benny" Bengough



              Benny Bengough dies on December 22, 1968 in Philadelphia at the age of 70. Better remembered for his career as a catcher for the Yankees from 1923-1930, Bengough finishes as a player for the 1931-1932 Browns. Known mainly for his glove work, Bengough registers a career BA of .255. Bengough was born in Niagara Falls, New York on July 27, 1898.



              Robert Clinton "Bobby" Hogue passes away on December 22, 1987 in his hometown of Miami, Florida at the age 65. The BR/TR posted a 1-1, 5.19 ERA record in a partial season, 18-game stint with the 1951 Browns. His career (1948-1952) MLB record closed at 18 wins, 16, losses, and an ERA of 3.97. - Bobby Hogue was born on April 5, 1921 in Miami, Florida.

              Today's reference links ... http://www.baseballlibrary.com/baseb...DECEMBER22.stm

              http://www.todayinbaseballhistory.com/
              Last edited by Bill_McCurdy; 04-05-2005, 10:15 AM.
              "Our fans never booed us. - They wouldn't dare. - We outnumbered 'em." ... Browns Pitcher Ned Garver.

              Comment


              • December 23rd

                Births on December 23rd


                "In all due modesty, I performed many charitable acts over the course of my lifetime, but, I must confess to the truth in this matter, as always. Playing for the St. Louis Browns was not among these." - Albert Schweitzer.

                Albert Caspar "Al" Schweitzer is born on December 23, 1882 in Cleveland, Ohio. Al will go on to hit .238 in 4 seasons as righthanded hitting outfielder for the 1908-1911 Browns. His 208 hits in 874 times at bat includes 3 home runs. If I have to guess, and that's what I'm doing in this case, I'm betting that those 3 homers were inside-the-art jobs. Schweitzer's years with the Browns are his entire big league career. He will die on January 27, 1969 at the age of 86 in Newark, Ohio. Thank you, Albert Schweitzer, for giving us something to report on this date in Browns history.

                Frederick Charles "Fritz" Maisel is born in Catonsville, Maryland on December 23, 1889. Maisel's 6-year career in the majors (1913-1918) amounted to a 5-year stint with the Yankees as an infielder - and a final year with the Browns as an outfielder. Fritz finished with a .238 career BA. He will leave this earth on April 22, 1967 in Baltimore, Maryland at the age of 77.

                Alphonse "Tommy" Thomas is born on December 23, 1899 in Baltimore, Maryland. The righthander's 12-year pitching career (1926-1937) includes two years with the Browns (1936-1937). Thomas is 11-10 as a Brown and 117-128 overall. He will die on April 27, 1988 in Dallastown, PA at the age of 88.

                Deaths on December 23rd

                None. If you were a St. Louis Brown, December 23rd was a day laced with grace for life. No Browns ever died on this date in history.

                Today's reference link ... http://www.todayinbaseballhistory.com/
                Last edited by Bill_McCurdy; 01-27-2005, 06:25 AM.
                "Our fans never booed us. - They wouldn't dare. - We outnumbered 'em." ... Browns Pitcher Ned Garver.

                Comment


                • December 24th

                  The Ballad of Eddie Gaedel (New Expanded 2004 Version)



                  A few years ago, I wrote a brief parody on Eddie Gaedel to the tune of "Rudolph The Red Nose Reindeer." For Christmas 2004, I've done some expansion work on the saga to the same old tune. To sing the following lyrics easier, just keep in mind these two things:

                  Verses are the stanzas that fit with "Rudolph The Red Nose Reindeer."

                  Choruses are the stanzas that fit with "Then one foggy, Christmas Eve."

                  It will also help if you pronounce the names Gaedel as GUY-dell and Saucier as SAW-shay.

                  From this point, you're on your own. - Merry Christmas, Everybody!

                  (verse 1)
                  Bill Veeck – The Brownie owner
                  Wore some very shiny clothes,
                  And if – you saw his sport shirt,
                  You would even say it glows.


                  (verse 2)
                  All of the other - owners,
                  Used to laugh and call him names.
                  They wouldn’t let poor - Bill Veeck,
                  Join in all their owner games.


                  (chorus 1)
                  Then one sultry, summer night,
                  Veeck’s brain flipped to fidget,
                  Slappin’ down hard on his wooden leg,
                  He decided to sign a midget.


                  (verse 3)
                  His name was - Eddie Gae-del,
                  He was only three-feet tall.
                  He didn’t have much talent,
                  Even for our Brownie ball.


                  (verse 4)
                  Veeck sent him in for Saucier,
                  Told him not to swing at all,
                  Said if – you move that - bat once,
                  You won’t live to see nightfall.


                  (chorus 2)
                  It came true on the 19th day,
                  August, Fifty-One.
                  Dead last place and – goin’ nowhere.
                  It was time for Brownie fun.


                  (verse 5)
                  Gaedel did what - Veeck wanted,
                  Took 4 balls and walked to 1st.
                  Then he gave way to Delsing,
                  Running for the one soon cursed.


                  (verse 6)
                  Baseball slapped down a - ban on,
                  Guys who didn’t stand too high
                  That took the bat from - Eddie,
                  Baseball told him bye, bye, bye!


                  (chorus 3)
                  Baseball scions – just can’t stand,
                  Genius on the loose.
                  They thought banning Gaedel’s bat,
                  Would slay old Bill Veeck’s goose.


                  (verse 7)
                  Oh, how the purists hated,
                  Adding little Eddie's name,
                  To the big book of records,
                  "Gaedel" bore a blush of shame!


                  (verse 8)
                  Still, when you look up records,
                  Look up Eddie's O.B.P.
                  It reads a cool - One Thousand,
                  Safe for all eternity.


                  :atthepc

                  ... and now, - the regular stuff ...

                  December 24, 1940: Merry Christmas, Johnny Allen! The Cleveland Indians brighten pitcher Johnny Allen's Christmas by selling him to the St. Louis Browns today for $20,000. Allen, whose lifetime record spans from 1932 through 1944, will go 2 and 5 for the 1941 Browns in 20 games, but he will be waived to the Dodgers on July 30th of that same year. Allen reaches Brooklyn in time to go 3-0 and help the Dodgers to their first pennant in 21 years. Allen later finishes with a career record of 142 wins, 75 losses, and an E.R.A. of 3.75

                  Births on December 24th

                  Yale Yeastman "Tod" Sloan is born on December 24, 1890 in Madisonville, Tennessee. The lefty hitting, righty throwing outfielder will sprinkle 3 years of service (1913, 1917, & 1919) with the Browns and bat .234 for his wholly Browns career. Sloan will die on September 12, 1956 in Akron, Ohio at the age of 65.

                  John Bernard "Jack" Graham is born on Christmas Eve 1916 in Minneapolis. The lefty 1st sacker will hit 24 homers and bat .238 for the 1949 Browns, but that season also marks the end of his big league career. Including some time with the Dodgers and Giants in 1946, Graham left a mark of .231 and 38 career homers. Graham will pass away on December 30, 1998 in Los Alamitos, California at the age of 82.

                  Deaths on Christmas Eve

                  John Aloysius "Johnnie" Heving dies on December 24, 1968 in Salisbury, North Carolina at the age of 72. The BR/TR catcher's Brpwns career consisted entirely of 1 fruitless time at bat in 1922. It also was his only game appearance of the 1922 year, but Heving was no gone-for-gooder. Heving came back with the Red Sox and Athletics to play 8 seasons in the big leagues (1922, 1924-1925, 1928-1932), finishing with a BA of .265 and 1 HR in 399 games. Johnnie Heving was born on April 29, 1896 in Covington, Kentucky.

                  William Edward "Bill" Friel dies on December 24, 1959 in St. Louis at the age of 82. Born on April 1, 1879 in Renovo, PA, Friel was one of the original Browns who came over to St. Louis with the roster of the transfered Brewers from Milwaukee. The all around utility guy played every position at one time or another and batted .245 for his year year MLB career (1901-03).

                  George Hartley "George" McQuinn dies on December 24, 1978 in Alexandria, Virginia, at the age of 68. George's birthdate is May 29, 1910. He was born in Arlington, Virginia. The longtime lefty 1st baseman of the Browns (1938-45) was one of the pennant and World Series heroes of the Browns' 1944 American League championship club. Over his whole big league career (1936-1948), McQuinn batted .276 with 135 homers.

                  Robert Julius "Bob" Habenicht dies on Christmas Eve 1980 in Richmond, Virginia at the age of 54. Habenicht was born on February 13, 1926 in St. Louis. Bob had brief stays with both of his hometown clubs, the 1951 Cardinals and 1953 Browns, as a righthanded pitcher. He racked up no decisions for either in 6 2/3 innings, but he was there long enough to leave a 6.76 E.R.A. as his career MLB mark.

                  Merry Christmas to All Former Browns and Fans!
                  And May Your Holiday Time Be Merry and Bright!

                  Todays reference links ... http://www.baseballlibrary.com/baseb...DECEMBER24.stm
                  Last edited by Bill_McCurdy; 05-29-2005, 05:26 AM.
                  "Our fans never booed us. - They wouldn't dare. - We outnumbered 'em." ... Browns Pitcher Ned Garver.

                  Comment


                  • December 25th

                    Merry Christmas, Browns Fans!

                    Christmas Day Births


                    William J. "Barry" McCormick
                    is born on December 25, 1874 on Maysville, Kentucky. In a big league career which spans from 1895 to 1904, Barry hits .238 as a righthanded infielder. McCormick is one of the original Browns, hitting .246 in 1902 and .217 in 1903. He will die on January 28, 1956 in Cincinnati at the age of 81.

                    Francis Rogers "Frank" Ellerbe is born on on December 25, 1895 in Marion County, South Carolina. Ellerbe is best remembered as the righthanded-hitting infielder on some great Browns teams of the early 1920's (1921-1924). In a major league career which extends from 1919 to 1924, Ellerbe finishes with a lifetime BA of .268. He live until July 7, 1988 when he passes away at the age of 92 in Latta, South Carolina.

                    Eugene Edward "Gene" Robertson is born on December 25, 1898 in St. Louis. In a Browns career which extends from 1919 through 1926, Gene will hit .319 for the 1924 club as a lefthanded batting 3rd baseman. His total career covers the years from 1919 through 1930. He finishes with a career BA of .280. Robertson will die on October 21, 1981 in Fallon, NV at the age of almost 83.

                    Lloyd Andrew "Lefty" Brown is born in my natal hometown of Beeville, Texas on December 25, 1904. I'm proud to say that Lloyd Brown and fellow Beeville native Melvin "Bert" Gallia both went on to pitch for the St. Louis Browns at separate times. Pretty good record for our town, especially when you consider that early 20th century Beeville was a very small place that also produced Curt Walker, who hit .304 playing outfield in the big leagues from 1919 to 1930. Lefty was only 1 and 6 in his only year with the 1933 Browns, but he achieved a lifetime big league mark of 91 wins and 105 losses for some bad teams from 1925 through 1940. Lloyd Brown also holds the ignominious record of giving uo 4 of Lou Gehrig's 23 record grand slam home runs. Brown died on January 14, 1974 in Opa-Locka, Florida at the age of 69.

                    Ned Franklin (The One & Only "Ned") Garver is born on December 25, 1925 in Ney, Ohio. Famous to Browns fans as the guy who went 20 wins and 12 losses for the last place 1951 Browns, who were only 52 wins and 102 losses as a team, Ned is a regular attendee of our annual Brownie Round Ups in St. Louis and one of the funniest after dinner speakers of all time. Garver pitched for the Browns from 1948 to 1952, but his total big league career extended to 1961. The righthander's lifetime record for some bad teams was 129 wins and 157 losses, with an E.R.A. of 3.73. At Christmas time 2004, Ned Garver is 79 and very much alive and kicking.


                    Ned Garver, A Browns Icon.

                    Happy Birthday, Ned!



                    Michael John "Mike" Blyzka is born on December 25, 1928 in Hamtramck, Michigan. Mike only played two years in the big leagues, but they were both landmark years. He was a 2-6 righthanded pitcher for the last Browns ball club in 1953 - and a 1-5 hurler for the first Baltimore Orioles club of 1954. Until his recent death in Cheyenne, Wyoming on October 13, 2004 at the age of 75, Mike was a regular attendee of our annual Brownie Round Ups in St. Louis and one of the nicest guys you could ever hope to meet.

                    We already miss you, Mike. God Bless.

                    Deaths on Christmas Day

                    Unless someone finds one that I failed to unearth, it appears that former Browns, so far, have drawn a bye on dying Christmas Day, Let's hope our good fortune continues.

                    Merry Christmas again, everyone. Now I've got to peel out of here and take care of some last minute Christmas preparations that have to do with things we need from the grocery store.

                    Today's reference link ... http://www.todayinbaseballhistory.com/
                    Last edited by Bill_McCurdy; 07-08-2005, 05:49 AM.
                    "Our fans never booed us. - They wouldn't dare. - We outnumbered 'em." ... Browns Pitcher Ned Garver.

                    Comment


                    • December 26th


                      December 26th is NOT exactly a Hall of Famer Day
                      In St. Louis Browns history, but we still remember.


                      Birthdates on December 26

                      Albert Joseph "Al" Milnar is born on December 26, 1913. The lefty pitcher will compile a Browns record of 2 wins and 2 losses for the 1943 and 1946 clubs. Milnar's overall big league record, mostly with the Indians, is 57 wins and 58 losses. His big league service span begins in 1936 and finishes with the Browns and Phillies in 1946. Milnar is celebrating his 91st birthday this morning.

                      Happy Birthday, Al Milnar!

                      Deaths on December 26

                      Philip "Phil" Stremmel dies on December 26, 1947 in Chicago at the age of 67. Born on April 16, 1880 in Zanesville, Ohio, Stremmel was a righthanded pitcher for the 1909-1910 Browns, compiling a 0 wins and 4 losses record as his totally ignominious baseball legacy. Regardless of his stats, the one condition that will not change is our often repeated fact. - He got there. For two seasons, Phil Stremmel did what millions of other ballplayers only dream of doing.

                      James Melvin "Jim" Bilbrey dies on December 26, 1985 at the age of 61 in Toledo, Ohio. Born on April 20, 1924 in Rickman, Tennessee, Bilbrey's entire MLB record is limited to one inning he pitched for the Browns on May 17, 1949. Bilbrey was not involved in the decision that day, but his 18.00 E.R.A. for that one inning of work probably led to the decision that kept him from further opportunity. Still, he had his shot.

                      BCT/GB, Jim Bilbrey!

                      Today's Reference Link ... http://www.todayinbaseballhistory.com/
                      Last edited by Bill_McCurdy; 04-20-2005, 03:13 PM.
                      "Our fans never booed us. - They wouldn't dare. - We outnumbered 'em." ... Browns Pitcher Ned Garver.

                      Comment


                      • December 27th

                        Births on December 27th

                        None to be found. Brownie mothers apparently were too busy checking out the after-Christmas sales during the late 19th and early 20th centuries.

                        Deaths on December 27th

                        Frederick William Alexander "Frtiz" Buelow dies at age 56 on December 27, 1933 in Detroit. Fritz's full name was longer than his 26-game career with the 1907 Browns and much more powerful than the $1.46 batting average he racked up that year as a part-time catcher. Over the course of his total big league career, Buelow failed to reach Mendoza before there even was such a name for the .200 mark by achieving a mark of .192 from 1899 to 1907. Fritz came by his teutonic name quite naturally. He was born in Berlin, Germany on February 13, 1876.


                        Paul Lehner (In His 1950 Philadelphia A's Bowman Card.)

                        Paul Eugene "Paul" Lehner dies at age 47 on December 27, 1967 in Brimingham, Alabama. The all-lefty outfielder enjoyed two tours with the Browns (1946-1949 and 1951) and batted .257 over the course of his total big league career. Lehner was born on July 1, 1920 in Dolomite, Alabama.

                        Today's reference link ... http://www.todayinbaseballhistory.com/
                        Last edited by Bill_McCurdy; 12-27-2004, 04:10 AM.
                        "Our fans never booed us. - They wouldn't dare. - We outnumbered 'em." ... Browns Pitcher Ned Garver.

                        Comment


                        • December 28th

                          On this date in Brownie history, December 28th ... nothing happened!


                          Just three days past Christmas,
                          As best we can bridge it,
                          Not a creature was stirring,
                          Not even a midget.


                          Nobody made the news today. Nobody was born. And nobody died. We may choose to surmise that this kind of day was the Browns family way of trying to live out the season's wish for peace on earth. Of course, that assumption drops us right into the philosophical trough of "is a state of nothingness really synonymous with the condition of peace?" - and that one, my friends, was a question the Browns found little comfort in embracing for the better part of fifty-two years.

                          Oh well. Tomorrow is another day. :atthepc
                          Last edited by Bill_McCurdy; 12-28-2004, 04:37 AM.
                          "Our fans never booed us. - They wouldn't dare. - We outnumbered 'em." ... Browns Pitcher Ned Garver.

                          Comment


                          • December 29th

                            December 29, 1919: Red Sox Acquire Eddie Foster.


                            Steady Eddie Foster.

                            In a move that stirs the embers of the New England Hot Stove League, the Boston Red Sox send outfielder Braggo Roth and 2nd baseman Red Shannon to Washington for pitcher Harry Harper, outfielder Mike Menoskey and 3rd baseman Eddie Foster. On August 15, 1922, the Browns will acquire Foster on waivers from the Red Sox. Foster will hit .306 in 37 games for the '22 Browns and become one of the reasons they almost win their first pennant that year. Foster stood only 5'6", but he was considered by many as the best hit-and-run guy of his era. Foster's clutch hitting once knocked out Eddie Plank's last shot at a non-hitter. In 1917, the 42-year old Plank had gone 8 2/3 innings against the Senators and was a closing in on the big fish. Unfortunately for Plank, he then walked a batter and had to face Eddie Foster. Foster promptly doubled home the runner to end Plank's hope for the no-no. On this date in history, December 29, 1919, Foster was on his way to the Red Sox, but he would have a later more important role in the history of the Browns.

                            Births on December 29

                            William Lusk "Bill" McAllester is born on December 29, 1889 in Chattanooga, Tennessee. McAllester will play baseball at the University of Tennessee and then see one year of action as a catcher in 39 games for the 1913 Browns. He will hit go 13 for 85 - good enough for a .153 BA and a one-way ticket back to Palookaville. McAllester will die in his birth city at the age of 80 on March 3, 1970.

                            George Wilson "George" Aiton is born on December 29, 1890 in Kingman, Kansas. Wilson will go 4 for 17 (.235) as an outfielder for the 1912 Browns and then disappear forever from the big leagues. Wilson will die on August 16, 1976 in Van Nuys, California at the age of 85.

                            William Hart "Bill" Knickerbocker is born on December 29, 1911 in Los Angeles, California. Knickerbocker will enjoy a nine-year career in the big leagues (1833-1942) as a middle infielder for five different clubs. He will play one season for the 1937 Browns and hit .261 in 121 games. His career BA will end up at a pretty fair .276 over 897 games. Knickerbocker will die at the age of 51 in Sebastopol, California. The date of his death was September 8, 1963.

                            Thomas Herbert "Tom" Upton is born on December 29, 1926 in Esther, Missouri. Upton will play three years in the majors (1950-1952) as a middle infielder and all but 5 of at bats for the '52 Senators will be taken as a Brown. Upton finishes with a .225 BA for 525 total AB's.

                            Happy 78th Birthday, Tom Upton!

                            Deaths on December 29

                            George Franklin "George" Blaeholder


                            George Blaeholder

                            George Blaeholder dies at nearly age 45 on December 29, 1947 in Garden Grove, California. The 5' 11" righthander racked up 90 wins and 111 losses for the Browns from 1925 to 1935. He was moved to the Athletics early in the 1935 season and he finished his career in 1936 with the Indians. His career record was 104 wins, 125 losses, and an E.R.A. of 4.54. Blaeholder was born on January 26, 1904 in Orange, California.

                            Walter Ernest "Walt" Alexander dies at age 87 on December 29, 1978 in Fort Worth, Texas. Alexander was a catcher for the 1912-1913 and 1915 Browns and he hit .188 for his total 162-game career (1912-1917). Alexander was born on March 3, 1891 in Atlanta, Georgia.

                            Edward Arthur "Ed" Albrecht dies at age 70 in Cahokia, Illinois. Albrecht was 1-1 as a righthanded pitcher for the 1949-1950 Browns in his total career as a big leaguer. He was born on February 28, 1929 in Affton, Missouri.

                            Today the Browns started making up for all the birthdays and funerals they missed on December 28th.

                            Today's reference links ... http://www.baseballlibrary.com/baseb...DECEMBER29.stm

                            http://www.baseballlibrary.com/baseb...ster_Eddie.stm

                            http://www.todayinbaseballhistory.com/
                            Last edited by Bill_McCurdy; 12-29-2005, 03:18 AM.
                            "Our fans never booed us. - They wouldn't dare. - We outnumbered 'em." ... Browns Pitcher Ned Garver.

                            Comment


                            • [QUOTE=Bill_McCurdy][SIZE=2][B]December 29

                              George Franklin "George" Blaeholder


                              George Blaeholder

                              George Blaeholder dies at nearly age 45 on December 29, 1947 in Garden Grove, California. The 5' 11" righthander racked up 90 wins and 111 losses for the Browns from 1925 to 1935. He was moved to the Athletics early in the 1935 season and he finished his career in 1936 with the Indians. His career record was 104 wins, 125 losses, and an E.R.A. of 4.54. Blaeholder was born on January 26, 1904 in Orange, California.

                              QUOTE]


                              Very probably the inventor (discoveror?) of the slider, and since Candy Cummings is in the HOF for possibly inventing the curve, our guy should be enshrined too.

                              Plus if you mentioned George Blaeholder's name on the street nobody would assume you were talking about a porn star, unlike ...

                              Comment




                              • George Blaeholder

                                Westsidegrounds: "Very probably the inventor (discoveror?) of the slider, and since Candy Cummings is in the HOF for possibly inventing the curve, our guy should be enshrined too.

                                "Plus if you mentioned George Blaeholder's name on the street nobody would assume you were talking about a porn star, unlike ..."
                                :atthepc

                                Very good points, WSG, although the inventor of the slider may be debated forever. A lot of people think that Christy Mathewson's fadeaway ball was the first slider and that even the great Giant star was simply the first big leaguer to use what he had personally learned from the great Rube Foster of Negro League baseball fame.

                                As for the name Candy Cummings sounding like a porn star, our Browns are not off the hook on that score. Remember? We once had a center fielder named Baby Doll.
                                "Our fans never booed us. - They wouldn't dare. - We outnumbered 'em." ... Browns Pitcher Ned Garver.

                                Comment

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