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  • October 7th - 2nd Time Around

    On This Date in History!



    October 7, 2005: Bill Veeck Finds the Soft Side of St. Louisan Hearts.

    In Fact, Reality Argued Louder Than Veeck.

    Recently, when it became totally obvious that Bill Veeck was serious about selling the Browns to Maryland buyers who would then move the franchise to Baltimore to start the 1954 season, St. Louis fans who had earlier bought stock in the club to help the club stay afloat, took action. They sued Veeck in attempt to block the departure. In a meeting with stockholders today, Veeck told them that he faces bankruptcy unless they drop their suit to block the move to Baltimore. (Wouldn't you love to read a transcript of that meeting? Based on its outcome, we may only conclude that Bill Veeck shined at his persuasive best.) After the meeting with Veeck, local stockholders will agree to fulfill Veeck's request and drop their suit against him. - The St. Louis Browns stockholders aren't really governed to their hard decision by sentiment for Veeck, or his convincing eloquence, but by the slow acceptance of the hard reality that nothing they do will stop what's now been put into motion. - The St. Louis Browns are lost to history.



    October 7, 1944: The Streetcar World Series; Browns vs. Cardinals, Game 4:

    Cardinals 5 - Browns 1.


    1944 is 1st Year that all World Series Games are played West of the Mississippi!

    The St. Louis City Series drew even at 2-2 today as the Cardinals took red wing and soared past the grounded Browns, 5-1. Paced at the plate by Stan Musial's 3 hits and 1 HR on the day, Browns starter Sig Jakucki is knocked from the game after giving up 4 runs in the first 3 innings. Harry Brecheen goes all the way for the Cardinals, effectively surviving 9 Browns hits by stranding 10 runners. The Browns get their only run in the bottom of the 8th, but a spectacular double play started by Marty Marion blocks them from a bigger rally. - Mort Cooper of the Cardinals is set to face Denny Galehouse tomorrow in Game 5 in a re-match of Game 1 starters.



    A Browns Record Booker

    Question: Which Browns club achieved the lowest slugging average for a single season?

    Answer: That would be the not-so-great 1910 Browns of the deadball era. Their .274 slugging average was the worst among a lot of bad hitting clubs in Browns history.



    Births on October 7



    Joe Giard
    Birth Name: Joseph Oscar Giard Bats : Left
    Born On: 10-07-1898 Throws : Left
    Born In: Ware, Massachusetts Height : 5-10½
    Died On: 07-10-1956 Weight : 170
    Died In: Worcester, Massachusetts First Game: 04-18-1925
    College: None Attended Last Game: 09-25-1927
    Nickname: Peco Draft: Not Applicable

    Pitcher Joe Giard was 13-15 for the 1925-1926 Browns before moving over to finish his big league career on the staff of the mighty 1927 Yankees. Giard had no record at New York and he mainly pitched mop up innings in 16 games for that great club. Giard finished with a career record of 13 wins, 15 losses, and an ERA of 5.96. - Joe Giard was 57 when he passed away in 1956.



    Deaths on October 7



    Stan Ferens
    Birth Name: Stanley Ferens Bats : Both
    Born On: 03-05-1915 Throws : Left
    Born In: Wendel, Pennsylvania Height : 5-11
    Died On: 10-07-1994 Weight : 170
    Died In: Hempfield Township, Pennsylvania First Game: 06-10-1942
    College: None Attended Last Game: 09-29-1946
    Nickname: Lefty Draft: Not Applicable

    Pitcher Stan Ferens went 5 and 13 with an ERA of 4.18 for the 1942 and 1946 Browns and then was gone for good from major league baseball. - Stan Ferens was 79 when he died in 1994. - BCT/GB, Lefty Stan Ferens!

    Today's Reference Links ... http://www.baseballlibrary.com/baseb...logy/today.stm

    MacMillan's Baseball Encyclopedia

    http://www.baseball-almanac.com/

    Have a Great Weekend, Everybody! :atthepc
    Last edited by Bill_McCurdy; 10-07-2005, 07:54 AM.
    "Our fans never booed us. - They wouldn't dare. - We outnumbered 'em." ... Browns Pitcher Ned Garver.

    Comment


    • October 8th - 2nd Time Around

      On This Date in History!



      October 8, 1944: The Streetcar World Series; Browns vs. Cardinals, Game 5:

      Cardinals 2 - Browns 0.


      1944 is 1st Year that all World Series Games are played West of the Mississippi!

      Mort Cooper of the Cardinals threw a complete game, 2-0, shutout at the Browns today, striking out 12, as the National Leaguers took a 3-2 lead in the Series. Denny Galehouse of the Browns also went the distance, striking out 10, but he got hurt by the long ball. Solo shot homers by Cardinal 1st baseman Ray Sanders in the top of the 6th - and another by Danny Litwhiler in 8th were enough to do the Browns in and give the Cardinals their first lead in the Series. - Max Lanier will take the mound in Game 6 - and he will be aiming to put an end to the Browns' hopes for their first World Series title. In a reprise of Game 2 starters, Nels Potter takes the mound for the Browns. Changing dugouts again, the Cardinals will be the home club in Game 6.



      A Browns Record Booker

      Question: How many members of the 1944 Browns are still alive on this date in 2005?

      Don Gutteridge turned 93 on June 19, 2005.

      Answer: There are 4 surviving members of the franchise's only American League pennant winner in St. Louis. They are infielder Don Gutteridge, catchers Red Hayworth and Frank Mancuso, and outfielder Boris "Babe" Martin. (Martin was a limited action rookie for the 1944 Browns and he did not appear in the World Series.)



      Births on October 8




      Doc Crandall
      Birth Name: James Otis Crandall Bats : Right
      Born On: 10-08-1887 Throws : Right
      Born In: Wadena, Indiana Height : 5-10½
      Died On: 08-17-1951 Weight : 180
      Died In: Bell, California First Game: 04-24-1908
      College: None Attended Last Game: 08-31-1918
      Nickname: Doc Draft: Not Applicable

      Pitcher Doc Crandall had a 10-year MLB career (1908-1916, 1918), winning 100, losing 62, and posting a nice 2.63 ERA. As a member of 1916 Browns for only 1.1 innings of work, Crandall posted no W/L record. - Doc Crandall was 63 when he died in 1951.



      Deaths on October 8



      Tony Giuliani
      Birth Name: Angelo John Giuliani
      Nickname: None
      Born On: 11-24-1912
      Born In: St. Paul, Minnesota
      Zodiac: Sagittarius
      Died On: 10-08-2004
      Died In: St. Paul, Minnesota
      Cemetery: Resurrection Cemetery, Mendota Heights, Minnesota
      College: None Attended
      Bats: Right
      Throws: Right
      Height: 5-11
      Weight: 175
      First Game: 04-18-1936 (Age 23)
      Last Game: 10-03-1943
      Draft: Not Applicable

      Catcher Tony Guiliani had a 7-season MLB career (1936-1941, 1943) in which he batted .233 with 0 homers in 674 times at bat. Guiliani was a Brown during his first two seasons (1926-1937). - Tony Guiliani was 71 when he died iin 1984.

      Today's Reference Links ... http://www.baseballlibrary.com/baseb...logy/today.stm

      http://www.sportingnews.com/archives...ries/1944.html

      MacMillan's Baseball Encyclopedia

      http://www.baseball-almanac.com/play...hp?p=guttedo01

      http://www.baseball-almanac.com/
      Last edited by Bill_McCurdy; 11-24-2005, 07:29 AM.
      "Our fans never booed us. - They wouldn't dare. - We outnumbered 'em." ... Browns Pitcher Ned Garver.

      Comment


      • October 9th - 2nd Time Around

        On This Date in History!



        October 9, 1951: Veeck Hires Hornsby to Manage Browns in 1952!

        Love isn't always lovelier - the 2nd time around.

        In New York today, St. Louis Browns owner Bill Veeck, Jr. signed Rogers Hornsby to a three-year contract as manager of the club. The Rajah, who last managed in the majors in 1937 as skipper of the Browns, was fired by Bill Veeck, Sr. in 1932 when Hornsby managed the Cubs. Inexplicably, or perhaps due to the persuasive talent of Veeck, Hornsby chose the Browns offer over a similar one from the Cardinals, who had just fired Marty Marion as manager.




        October 9, 1944: The Streetcar World Series; Browns vs. Cardinals, Game 5:

        Cardinals 3 - Browns 1.


        1944 is 1st Year that all World Series Games are played West of the Mississippi!


        Cardinals Take World Series, 4 Games to 2.

        It's over. The Browns posted their last lead in the World Series with 1-run in the top of the 2nd, but the Cardinals came back with a 3-run spot in the bottom of the 4th that would hang in there as the final 3-1 margin of victory that gave the St. Louis Nationals a 4-2 win in World Series games over the American League Browns.

        Max Lanier and Ted Wilks, pitchers who posted identical victory totals and earned-run averages (17 triumphs, 2.65 ERA) for the Cardinals in 1944, combined to bring the Browns' memorable season to a halt in Game 6. Lanier worked 5 1/3 innings of three-hit ball, while the 28-year-old rookie Wilks - who lost only 4 times during the regular season - retired all 11 Browns he faced - striking out 4 pinch hitters in the process of totally closing the door on the Browns. - Wilks didn't face any easy path to that streak either. He came into the game when the Browns had runners on 2nd and 4rd with no outs. - What an mpressive place to start a shutdown. - In the 4th, the Cardinals benefitted from a throwing error by Vern Stephens and run-scoring singles by Emil Verban and pitcher Lanier. - Unfortunately the error by Stephens was only one of 10 that the Browns committed in the 6-game Series. - The Browns picked a bad time to play bad defensem, but that's how it went - and it was hardly a formula for success and no excuse for failure.

        Browns pitching wasn't all that bad. It just failed at a critical time and it was too late for recovery beyond that bump in the road. Nels Potter was knocked out after 3.2 innings, but the damage had been done. Bob Muncrief (2.1 innings) and Kramer (2 innings) stop the Cards from scoring beyond the 4th.

        By 1944, the World Series had become old hat for the St. Louis Cardinals, who were appearing in the event for the 8th time in 19 seasons. For the St. Louis Browns, on the other hand, the fall classic of 1944 would be savored over time as a once-in-a-lifetime thing. - What never became before, never came again.

        On the wrap-up side, George McQuinn of the Browns hit .438 for the Series. The winning Cardinals each received $4,626 shares; the losing Browns each took $2,743 shares - the lowest player pay-outs since 1933.



        October 9, 1910: Cobb-Lajoie Batting Competition in Ethics Potboiler Finish.

        Nap Lajoie played the hero to Ty Cobb's villain.

        The battle for the American League batting title is decided on the final day, when Detroit's Ty Cobb edges Cleveland's Napoleon Lajoie, .3850687 to .3840947. Neither man covers himself with Hall of Fame level glory. Lajoie goes 8 for 8 in a doubleheader with the St. Louis Browns, accepting six "gift" hits on bunt singles when Browns rookie 3rd baseman Red Corriden is apparently purposely stationed by manager Jack O'Connor at the edge of the outfield grass. The prejudiced St. Louis scorer also credits the popular Nap Lajoie with a "hit" on the Brownie shortstop Bobby Wallace's wild throw to first base. In Lajoie's last at bat, he is safe at first on an error call, but is credited with a sacrifice bunt since a man was on base at the time. The St. Louis Post is just one of the papers to be openly critical of the move against Cobb. "All St. Louis is up in arms over the deplorable spectacle, conceived in stupidity and executed in jealousy." The Browns win the opener, 5–4, and Cleveland takes the nitecap, 3–0, with both managers, Jack O'Connor and Deacon McGuire catching. O'Connor is behind the plate for just an inning, but Maguire goes all the way.

        Cobb, meanwhile, rather than risk his average, sits out the last two games, the Tigers beating the White Sox in the finale, 2–1. Ban Johnson investigates and clears everyone concerned, enabling Ty Cobb to win the 3rd of nine straight batting crowns. The embarrassed Chalmers Auto Company awards cars to both Ty and Nap. In 1981 The Sporting News uncovers an error -crediting a 2 for 3 game twice to Cobb—that, if corrected, would give the championship to Nap Lajoie. But the commissioner's committee votes unanimously to leave history unchanged.



        A Browns Record Booker

        Question: During their 1944 American League championship regular season, what was the ateendance of the the St. Louis Browns?

        Answer: The 1944 AL champion Browns drew 508,644 fans. - By contrast, the last place Washington Senators attracted a 525,235 gate - or 16,591 more than their pennant-winning competition in St. Louis.



        Births on October 9


        Bill Reidy
        Birth Name: William Joseph Reidy Bats : Right
        Born On: 10-09-1873 Throws : Right
        Born In: Cleveland, Ohio Height : 5-10
        Died On: 10-14-1915 Weight : 175
        Died In: Cleveland, Ohio First Game: 07-21-1896
        College: None Attended Last Game: 07-01-1904
        Nickname: None Draft: Not Applicable

        Pitcher Bill Reidy had a 6-year MLB record (1896, 1899, 1901-1904) of 27 wins and 41 losses with an ERA of 4.17. - Rediy was among the 1901 Brewers who became an original Brown when the franchise was shifted from Milwaukee to St. Louis in 1902. In 2 seasons with the Browns (1902-1903), Reidy had a record of 4 wins and 9 losses. - Bill Reidy 42 when he died in 1915.



        Ernie Manning
        Birth Name: Ernest Devon Manning Bats : Left
        Born On: 10-09-1890 Throws : Right
        Born In: Florala, Alabama Height : 6-00
        Died On: 04-28-1973 Weight : 175
        Died In: Pensacola, Florida First Game: 05-03-1914
        College: Auburn Polytechnic Institute Last Game: 06-14-1914
        Nickname: Ed Draft: Not Applicable

        Pitcher Ernie Manning worked 10 innings of relief for the 1914 Browns, posting no record to go with his 3.60 short-term ERA. After 1914, the gone-for-gooder joined the rest of us in the everyday woodwork of life. - Ernie Manning was 82 when he died iin 1973.



        Deaths on October 9



        Joe DeBerry
        Birth Name: Joseph Gaddy DeBerry Bats : Left
        Born On: 11-29-1896 Throws : Right
        Born In: Mount Gilead, North Carolina Height : 6-01
        Died On: 10-09-1944 Weight : 175
        Died In: Southern Pines, North Carolina First Game: 08-24-1920
        College: North Carolina College of Agricultural and Engineering Last Game: 09-03-1921
        Nickname: Joe Draft: Not Applicable

        Pitcher Joe DeBerry had a 2-5 record with a 5.24 ERA in his 2-year MLB career with the Browns (1920-1921). - Joe DeBerry was 47 when he died in 1944.



        Mark Christman
        Birth Name: Marquette Joseph Christman Bats : Right
        Born On: 10-21-1913 Throws : Right
        Born In: Maplewood, Missouri Height : 5-11
        Died On: 10-09-1976 Weight : 180
        Died In: St. Louis, Missouri First Game: 04-20-1938
        College: None Attended Last Game: 09-23-1949
        Nickname: None Draft: Not Applicable

        Infielder Mark Christman had a 9-year MLB career (1938-1939, 1943-1949) in which he batted .253 with 19 home runs. Christman wasa Brown for 4 seasons (1939, 1943-1946), batting .271 with 6 HR's for the 1944 American League champions. - Mark Christman was 12 days shy of age 63 when he died in 1976.


        Today's Reference Links ... http://www.baseballlibrary.com/baseb...logy/today.stm

        http://www.sportingnews.com/archives...ries/1944.html

        MacMillan's Baseball Encyclopedia

        http://www.baseball-almanac.com/
        Last edited by Bill_McCurdy; 10-23-2005, 03:47 AM.
        "Our fans never booed us. - They wouldn't dare. - We outnumbered 'em." ... Browns Pitcher Ned Garver.

        Comment


        • October 10th - 2nd Time Around

          On This Date in History!



          October 10, 1953: Wake Era of the St. Louis Browns.

          ... not exactly, but close.

          Without time and opportunity for deeper research, there isn't anything to report for October 10th in the history of the St. Louis Browns. In light of that vacuum, let's reflect briefly on what life in America was like in October 1953 with the Browns now gone. Wish I had time to do the subject justice. It was an era I recall from the perspective of a 15 year old high school sophomore.


          October 1953. Dwight David Eisenhower was President. - America was locked into the Cold War with the Soviet Union. - The Korean War cease-fire agreement had been signed on July 27, 1953, but the Domino Theory of Secretary of State John Foster Dulles was still the cornerstone of our foreign policy. - Most of us still lived in families that had two parents, with the father working and the mother staying home. - Overt racism and segregation were still the cancer that belied our 4th of July rhetoric about "liberty and justice for all." - Reading and radio both were still popular, but not as they had been in the 1940's. We were becoming a nation of television sets - and one that was getting used to taking in our news with pictures. - TV allowed us to watch everything from atomic bombs being exploded in New Mexico to the World Series. - The major leagues were now in reach to all of us via TV. - For those of us growing up in the hinterlands, it was to become a condition that hurt attendance at minor league games. - NBC was getting ready to launch "Victory at Sea," their prize-winning tv series on the naval war during World War II. - Rock 'n Roll was a year away from beginning its early assault upon the musical tastes of my generation. In October 1953, we still preferred Frank Sinatra, Nat "King" Cole, Doris Day, and Tony Bennett. - Over the next two years, performers like Elvis Presley, Chuck Berry, Little Richard, and Fats Domino would be taking us in a new musical direction. - Getting a "good education" so that we could support our families was the working proposition in our lives. - We didn't think much about issues of social injustice in middle and working working class white America - nor did we ever consider protesting the draft, issues of civil rights, the integrity of politicians, or the values of corporate America. - Many of us simply assumed that, if we did all the right things, that corporate America would return our loyalty in kind over our lifetime of service. - Personally, I grew up in a blue collar neighborhood in Houston. I was able to attend the only Catholic boys' high school in town by passing an entrance exam. My educational exposure ran me through the toughest subjects that one of the best private schools in Houston had to offer, but the premise of this journey was always "what's the right answer?" - and never "what do you think?" - I didn't mind at the time because I wasn't that interested in thinking anyway. - All I cared about was playing baseball, reading my Sporting News bible, and doing the right thing in my parents' eyes so that I'd have enough time left over for other fun. - I still went to Mass every Sunday and I learned to copy what I saw. - When Mass ended every week, all the men of my father's generation couldn't wait to get outside to fire up a cigarette. - Sadly, I soon joined them, but no one seemed to mind. - It was the thing to do. - Heck, even Whitey Ford smoked - and he was one of the greatest pitchers in baseball. - I felt sad about the loss of the Browns, but I assumed that something good would come of it in the long run. - I had no idea what I was talking about. It was just something I was trained to think. - Other lessons awaited me about the truth and fallacy of that assumption, but that's how I saw it in October 1953. - The St. Louis Browns were gone - and I still had a lot to learn. - Still do.

          I'll be back to do the Browns Record Booker and milestone information later. Hope you will cut me some slack on the personal dissertation. Maybe I'm still hungover from watching every pitch of that 18-inning game between the Astros and Braves yesterday. - Maybe it's the fact that it's a rainy morning in Houston. - Reverie always falls like rain in my tired old mind - and the only drops that fall as purely now as then for me - are those that fall in the sandlot of my still ageless love of baseball.



          A Browns Record Booker

          Question: Who made the last out in the history of the the St. Louis Browns?

          Jim Dyck is the man who turned out the lights.

          Answer: Third baseman Jim Dyck holds that place in history. With the Browns trailing the White Sox, 2-1, in the bottom of the 11th inning and 2 outs on September 27, 1953, Dyck flew out to end the game and the last season of the St. Louis Browns.



          Births on October 10



          Bill Killefer
          Birth Name: William Killefer Bats : Right
          Born On: 10-10-1887 Throws : Right
          Born In: Bloomingdale, Michigan Height : 5-10½
          Died On: 07-03-1960 Weight : 170
          Died In: Elsmere, Delaware First Game: 09-13-1909
          College: St. Edward's College Last Game: 10-01-1921
          Nickname: Reindeer Bill Draft: Not Applicable

          Catcher Bill Killifer had a 13-year career in MLB (1909-1921) and he batted .238 with 4 HR's. Killifer played 85 games for the Browns during his first 2 year (1909-1910), but didn't hit a buck-forty either season. We assume that the "Reindeer" descriptor assigned to his first name identity has something to do with his ability to run or throw quickly and not due to the fact that his nose lit up every night. The latter guess is improbable. After all, "Reindeer Bill" came along years sooner than "Rudolph" the red-nosed you-know-what. - Bill Killifer was 72 when he died in 1960.



          Fay Thomas
          Birth Name: Fay Wesley Thomas Bats : Right
          Born On: 10-10-1903 Throws : Right
          Born In: Holyrood, Kansas Height : 6-02
          Died On: 08-12-1990 Weight : 195
          Died In: Chatsworth, California First Game: 06-27-1927
          College: University of Southern California Last Game: 09-29-1935
          Nickname: Scow Draft: Not Applicable

          Pitcher Fay Thomas had 4-season MLB career (1927, 1931-1932, 1935), finishing with a record of 9-20 and an ERA of 4.95. In his only season with the 1935 Browns, Thomas was 7-15 with a 4.78 ERA. - Fay Thomas was 86 when he passed away in 1990.



          Tommy Fine
          Birth Name: Thomas Morgan Fine Bats : Both
          Born On: 10-10-1914 Throws : Right
          Born In: Cleburne, Texas Height : 6-00
          Died On: 01-10-2005 Weight : 180
          Died In: Little Elm, Texas First Game: 04-26-1947
          College: Baylor University Last Game: 06-28-1950
          Nickname: Tommy Draft: Not Applicable

          Pitcher Tommy Fine was 1-2 with a 5.50 ERA for the 1947 Red Sox and 0-1 with an 8.10 ERA for the 1950 Browns before departing for The Land of Gone for Good. Tommy Fine was 90 when he died in 2005. - BCT/GB, Tommy Fine!



          Floyd Baker
          Birth Name: Floyd Wilson Baker Bats : Left
          Born On: 10-10-1916 Throws : Right
          Born In: Luray, Virginia Height : 5-09
          Died On: 11-16-2004 Weight : 160
          Died In: Youngstown, Ohio First Game: 05-04-1943
          College: None Attended Last Game: 05-04-1955
          Nickname: The Glove Man Draft: Not Applicable

          Infielder Floyd Baker had a 13-year MLB career (1943-1955), batting ,151 with only 1 HR in 2,280 official times at bat. Floyd started with the 1943-1944 Browns, but he played in only 66 games those two seasons and hit less than Mendoza each year. - Floyd Baker was 88 when he passed away in 2004.



          Deaths on October 10



          Harry Vahrenhorst
          Birth Name: Harry Henry Vahrenhorst Bats : Right
          Born On: 02-13-1885 Throws : Right
          Born In: St. Louis, Missouri Height : 6-01
          Died On: 10-10-1943 Weight : 175
          Died In: St. Louis, Missouri First Game: 09-21-1904
          College: None Attended Last Game: 09-21-1904
          Nickname: Van Draft: Not Applicable

          Big league aseball aspirant Harry Vahrenhorst never got to use the "TR" second part of his basic descriptor. Van's big league experience was limited to one failed late season time at bat for the Browns on September 21, 1904. After going 0 for 1, the rest of Vahrenhorst's life was written quietly away from the pages of baseball history. He came and went so fast that we shall be left with no easy information about his intended position in the field. All we know for sure is - he never get to catch or throw a ball - or even to stand idly between the lines - during an official game. All we know easily from his bare stats is that he did not strike out in his 0 for 1 career. In terms of getting another chance, it never happened in the big leagues. - Harry Vahrenhorst was 58 when he died in 1943. - BCT/GB, Fritz Vahrenhorst!



          Lefty Leifield



          Birth Name: Albert Peter Leifield Bats : Left
          Born On: 09-05-1883 Throws : Left
          Born In: Trenton, Illinois Height : 6-01
          Died On: 10-10-1970 Weight : 165
          Died In: Alexandria, Virginia First Game: 09-03-1905
          College: None Attended Last Game: 09-24-1920
          Nickname: Lefty Draft: Not Applicable

          Pitcher Lefty Leifield is best remembered as a stellar hurler for the Pirates during the first decade of the 20th century, but he finished as a Brown during the 1918-1920 seasons, winning 8 and losing 10. - Over his career, Leifield won 124, lost 97, and recorded an ERA of 2.47. - Lefty Leifield was 87 when he dies in 1970.



          Russ Van Atta
          Birth Name: Russell Van Atta Bats : Left
          Born On: 06-21-1906 Throws : Left
          Born In: Augusta, New Jersey Height : 6-00
          Died On: 10-10-1986 Weight : 184
          Died In: Andover, New Jersey First Game: 04-25-1933
          College: Pennsylvania State College Last Game: 05-11-1939
          Nickname: Sheriff Draft: Not Applicable

          Pitcher Russ Van Atta posted a 7-year MLB career (1933-1939) and finished with a record of 33 wins, 41 losses, and an ERA of 5.60. Van Atta went 18-32 during his 5 years as a Brown (1935-1939). - Russ Van Atta was 80 when he died in 1986.

          Today's Reference Link ... http://www.baseball-almanac.com/
          Last edited by Bill_McCurdy; 10-10-2005, 08:31 PM.
          "Our fans never booed us. - They wouldn't dare. - We outnumbered 'em." ... Browns Pitcher Ned Garver.

          Comment


          • October 11th - 2nd Time Around

            On This Date in History!



            October 11, 1926: Sisler Steps Down as Browns Manager; Stays as Player.

            Even the great ones don't always get what they want.

            The St. Louis Browns announced today that George Sisler will be back as a player in 1927, but not as manager. Dan Howley will take over the field helm for the Browns next season as Sisler returns full-time to the job he does best. - In a note of irony, Sisler's relief from the worries of managing the Browns in 1927 does not show up in his stats. He will hit .290 in over 600 AB's for the lowest full season average in his Hall of Fame career.



            A Browns Record Booker

            Question: What was George Sisler's 3-season record as manager of the Browns from 1924 to 1926?

            Answer: George Sisler's 1924 Browns club finished 4th in the American League with a record of 74-78. His 1925 Browns climbed to 3rd with an 82-71 final mark. The wheels came off in 1926 and the Browns dropped to 7th place and a 62-92 record. Even Sisler could not carry the Browns to new heights for long.



            Births on October 11



            Frank Roth
            Birth Name: Francis Charles Roth Bats : Right
            Born On: 10-11-1878 Throws : Right
            Born In: Chicago, Illinois Height : 5-10
            Died On: 03-27-1955 Weight : 160
            Died In: Burlington, Wisconsin First Game: 04-18-1903
            College: None Attended Last Game: 10-09-1910
            Nickname: None Draft: Not Applicable

            Utility player Frank Roth played 6 years (1903-1906, 1909-1910), including 29 games for for the 1905 Browns. His career BA in 233 games was .250 with 1 HR. - Frank Roth was 76 when he passed away in 1955.



            Tom Carey
            Birth Name: Thomas Francis Aloysius Carey Bats : Right
            Born On: 10-11-1906 Throws : Right
            Born In: Hoboken, New Jersey Height : 5-08½
            Died On: 02-21-1970 Weight : 170
            Died In: Rochester, New York First Game: 07-19-1935
            College: None Attended Last Game: 07-07-1946
            Nickname: Scoops Draft: Not Applicable

            Middle infielder Tom Carey hit .291, .273, and .275 in heavy use by the 1935-1937 Browns. For his total career (1935-1942, 1946), With time out for service in WWII, Scoops Carey hit a very respectable .275 in 1,521 times at bat. - Carey was 63 when he died in 1970.



            Deaths on October 11



            Stan Gray *
            Birth Name: Stanley Oscar Gray Bats : Right
            Born On: 12-10-1888 Throws : Right
            Born In: Ladonia, Texas Height : 6-00½
            Died On: 10-11-1964 Weight : 184
            Died In: Snyder, Texas First Game: 09-17-1912
            College: None Attended Last Game: 09-18-1933
            Nickname: None Draft: Not Applicable

            * Stan Gray is a minor mystery in need of further research and probably does not even belong here. Check out the way his data is displayed in Baseball Almanac and come to your own conclusions. After showing up as a 1st baseman who only played in 6 games for the 1912 Pirates, his fielding stats show him as a pitcher who played for 10 seasons (1924-1933). My first guess is that some convolution of stats has occurred in the player data bank. If you know the answer - or if you have any thoughts about what appears to be a pure data error, please send me an IM - or e-mail me at [email protected] - Here's the specific link to the alleged career stats of Stan Gray ...

            http://www.baseball-almanac.com/play...php?p=graydo02

            I will also pursue the matter with Baseball Almanac. Gray's alleged 6 seasons with the Browns (1928-1933) as a fielding pitcher who never batted is a dead giveaway to data error. I'd just like to clear this up before deleting him from mention here.

            Once we get past Stan Gray, it appears, so far, that no real Browns ever died on October 11.

            Today's Reference Links ... http://www.baseballlibrary.com/baseb...logy/today.stm

            http://www.baseball-almanac.com/
            Last edited by Bill_McCurdy; 10-11-2005, 06:44 AM.
            "Our fans never booed us. - They wouldn't dare. - We outnumbered 'em." ... Browns Pitcher Ned Garver.

            Comment


            • October 12th - 2nd Time Around

              On This Date in History!



              October 12, 2005: Happy Columbus Day!

              The Browns and Serendipity.

              This real Columbus Day offers little room for discovery about Browns history. Nothing big ever happened on this date and, if it did, it wasn't written about in hard copy form - nor was it published on the Internet. As a result, this morning leaves me open to reflect anew upon my own connection to the Browns family.

              The first contact point for me is the fact that two former players from my birthplace of Beeville, Texas spent time as St. Louis Browns. Righthander Bert Gallia won 20 and lost 21 in three seasons for the 1918-1920 Browns. Lefty Lloyd Brown won 1 and lost 6 for the 1933 Browns. - Neither of these players had any conscious impact upon my early conversion to the family of Browns fans as I was growing up in Houston. - I was aware of Gallia and Brown through my dad's stories, but they played way before my time - and I never met either.

              As I've written about earlier, often, and elsewhere - I was always an underdog-driven kid. The Browns became my club in the summer of 1951 when, at age 13, I found myself absolutely fascinated by the amazing 20-12 season of Ned Garver for the last place Browns. I carried Ned's baseball card in my pocket when I pitched for my sandlot club, the Pecan Park Eagles. The card was pretty faded and wrinkled by summer's end, but my fan conversion to the Browns from the Cardinals had been indelibly fixed. - The trouble was timing. - Two years later, the Browns were gone forever.

              Jerry Witte was my local childhood hero as a member of the Houston Buffs from 1950 to 1952. Jerry was a Brownie phenom who didn't make it with the club in brief cups of coffee in 1946 and 1947. - In 2003, we posthumously published the biography of Jerry's life that he and I wrote together in the 9th inning of his time on earth. It's called "A Kid From St. Louis" and it was published by my company, Pecan Park Eagle Press. - It's really a very hands on, personal trip back in time to how things were for ballplayers during the reserve clause era. - Net proceeds on the sale of the book are dedicated to the museum fund of our Texas Baseball Hall of Fame and copies are still available. - Just contact me, if you're interested.

              I grew up down the street in Houston from the mother of Frank Mancuso, one of the catchers on the 1944 American League championship Browns. My mom and Mrs. Mancuso used to go grocery shopping together. What a sweet lady she was! - If you had to lose a baseball in the yard of any house on Japonica Street, Mrs. Mancuso's place was the safest place to do it. She just seemed to understand better than most moms how important it was for us to find that missing baseball.

              Earlier this week, I got a call from Shaun Bijani, the grandson of Frank Mancuso. - Sean is now a radio and television major at the University of Houston. He called to get my input on a local baseball history project he is doing on old Buff Stadium - and also to invite me to be his interview subject on a TV spot he wants to do about the Texas Baseball Hall of Fame. Of course, I told him that I'd be happy to help in any way possible. "Anything for family." - That's how it felt.

              The beat goes on.



              A Browns Record Booker

              Question: Who was the first Brown to lead the American League in hits?

              George Stone was an early big bat for Browns.

              Answer: Left fielder George Stone of the 1905 Browns was the first of our guys to lead the American League in hits. Stone's 187 safeties for the last place '05 club (that won 54 and lost 99) netted him only a .296 batting average.



              Births on October 12



              Ivan Howard
              Birth Name: Ivan Chester Howard Bats : Both
              Born On: 10-12-1882 Throws : Right
              Born In: Kenney, Illinois Height : 5-10
              Died On: 03-30-1967 Weight : 170
              Died In: Medford, Oregon First Game: 04-25-1914
              College: None Attended Last Game: 09-29-1917
              Nickname: None Draft: Not Applicable

              Utility player Ivan Howard played 2 seasons with the 1914-15 Browns and 2 seasons with the 1916-1917 Indians. In 302 MLB games, Howard hit .233 with 2 homers. His best year came in 1915 when he hit both of his career homers as a Brown while batting .278 in 113 games and also played all infield positions, but catcher, plus some outfield on defense. - Ivan Howard was 84 when he died in 1967.



              Joe Jenkins
              Birth Name: Joseph Daniel Jenkins Bats : Right
              Born On: 10-12-1890 Throws : Right
              Born In: Shelbyville, Tennessee Height : 5-11
              Died On: 06-21-1974 Weight : 170
              Died In: Fresno, California First Game: 04-30-1914
              College: None Attended Last Game: 09-27-1919
              Nickname: None Draft: Not Applicable

              Catcher Joe Jenkins played 40 games in the big leagues over 3 seasons (1914, 1917, 1919), hitting only .133 with 0 homers in 60 official times at bat. In his only year as a Brown in 1914, Jenkins batted .125 (4 for 32). - Joe Jenkins was 83 when he died in 1974.



              Dixie Davis
              Birth Name: Frank Talmadge Davis Bats : Right
              Born On: 10-12-1890 Throws : Right
              Born In: Wilsons Mills, North Carolina Height : 5-11
              Died On: 02-04-1944 Weight : 155
              Died In: Raleigh, North Carolina First Game: 07-12-1912
              College: None Attended Last Game: 09-20-1926
              Nickname: Dixie Draft: Not Applicable

              Pitcher Dixie Davis was an important member of the great early 1920's Browns clubs. In 7 seasons as a Brown (1920-1926), Dixie won 75 games and lost 68. His best year was 1920, when he won 18, lost 12, and registered a 3.17 ERA. Including 3 prior short and ineffective stays with the 1912 Reds, the 1915 White Sox, and the 1918 Phillies, Davis finished his career as a Brown with an overall record of 75 wins, 71 losses, and an ERA of 3.97. - Davis was an example of what may happen for those with enough talent and heart to not give up. He had three chances to cash it in with other clubs pror to reaching the Browns, but he stayed with it - and is now remembered for his accomplishments as a result. - Dixie Davis was 53 when he died in 1944.



              Stew Bolen
              Birth Name: Stewart O'Neal Bolen Bats : Left
              Born On: 10-12-1902 Throws : Left
              Born In: Jackson, Alabama Height : 5-11
              Died On: 08-30-1969 Weight : 180
              Died In: Mobile, Alabama First Game: 04-15-1926
              College: None Attended Last Game: 05-16-1932
              Nickname: None Draft: Not Applicable

              Pitcher Stew Bolen had 4-year MLB career with the 1926-1927 Browns and the 1931-1932 Phillies. - Stew's record with the Browns was 0 and 1 in limited service. His career record (mostly with the Phillies) included 3 wins, 13 losses, and an ERA of 6.09. - Stew Bolen was 66 when he passed away in 1969.



              Jack Crouch
              Birth Name: Jack Albert Crouch Bats : Right
              Born On: 10-12-1903 Throws : Right
              Born In: Salisbury, North Carolina Height : 5-09
              Died On: 08-25-1972 Weight : 165
              Died In: Leesburg, Florida First Game: 09-18-1930
              College: None Attended Last Game: 10-01-1933
              Nickname: Roxy Draft: Not Applicable

              Catcher Jack Crouch (what a great name for a catcher) played 3 seasons in the big leagues (1930-1931, 1933), mostly with the Browns. He played the last 10 games of his 43-game career with the Reds, finishing with a total BA of .125 and 1 HR. - Of course, we was on the road to that well known land of forgotten major leaguers, The Land of Gone for Good. - Jack Crouch was 68 when he died in 1903.



              Rick Ferrell

              Rick Ferrell Broke In with The Browns.

              Birth Name: Richard Benjamin Ferrell Bats : Right
              Born On: 10-12-1905 Throws : Right
              Born In: Durham, North Carolina Height : 5-10
              Died On: 07-27-1995 Weight : 160
              Died In: Bloomfield Hills, Michigan First Game: 04-19-1929
              College: Guilford College Last Game: 09-14-1947
              Nickname: Rick Draft: Not Applicable

              Catcher Rick Ferrell plays 18 years in the big leagues (1929-1945, 1947) and hits .281 with 21 homers. Ferrell is twice a Brown (1929-1933 and 1941-1943) over one of the most productive long term careers by any major league catcher. Ferrell died at age 89 in 1995.



              Deaths on October 12



              So far, no Browns have landed in the Field of Dreams on October 12

              Today's Reference Link ... http://www.baseball-almanac.com/
              Last edited by Bill_McCurdy; 10-14-2005, 02:07 PM.
              "Our fans never booed us. - They wouldn't dare. - We outnumbered 'em." ... Browns Pitcher Ned Garver.

              Comment


              • October 13th - 2nd Time Around

                On This Date in History!



                October 13, 1913: Browns & Cardinals Duke It Out In City Series!

                Sometimes baseball turns into a contact sport (as if it weren't already).

                In St. Louis today, the City Series between the Browns and the Cardinals ends in a fight. In today's doubleheader, the Cardinals had taken the first game 5–2, and the 2nd game, and the 2nd game is tied 1–1 after four innings when a brawl broke out. Since there had been several other fights in the series, and because the series was played outside the auspices of the National Commission, the umps announce they have had it, and retire to the clubhouse. The series ends abruptly at three wins apiece, with one tie. Each Brownie player received $77.22.



                A Browns Record Booker

                Question: Who was the first Brown to lead the American League with the highest batting average?

                George Stone Rides Again!

                Answer: Itwas left fielder George Stone again. In 1906, the year after he led the league in total hits, Stone's .358 batting average for the 5th place place '06 club (that won 79 and lost 73) allowed the slugging Brownie to capture the team's 1st individual batting championship.



                Births on October 13



                Rube Waddell
                Birth Name: George Edward Waddell Bats : Right
                Born On: 10-13-1876 Throws : Left
                Born In: Bradford, Pennsylvania Height : 6-01½
                Died On: 04-01-1914 Weight : 196
                Died In: San Antonio, Texas First Game: 09-08-1897
                College: Volant College Last Game: 08-01-1910
                Nickname: Rube Draft: Not Applicable



                HOF pitcher Rube Wddell was one of the greatest, biggest oddball lefties of all time. Over the course of his career (1897, 1899-1910), Rube won 193 games, lost 143, and achieved an ERA of only 2.16. Although his best years were registered with the Athletics, Waddell did mark a record of 33 wins and 29 losses to wrap up his big league career with the 1908-1910 Browns. Rube Waddell is a member of the Baseball Hall of Fame. Rube Waddell died at age 37 in 1914.



                Ham Patterson
                Birth Name: Hamilton Patterson Bats : Right
                Born On: 10-13-1877 Throws : Right
                Born In: Belleville, Illinois Height : 6-02
                Died On: 11-25-1945 Weight : 185
                Died In: East St. Louis, Illinois First Game: 05-18-1909
                College: None Attended Last Game: 08-30-1909
                Nickname: None Draft: Not Applicable

                1st baseman/outfielder Ham Patterson hit .204 (10/49) with 0 HR's for the 1909 Browns. An 0 for 3 added tab for the 1909 White Sox settled Ham's brief career BA at .192 and launched him into the the Land of Gone for Good. - Ham Patterson was 68 when he died in 1945. - BCT/GB, Ham Patterson!



                Chris Burkam
                Birth Name: Chauncey De Pew Burkam Bats : Left
                Born On: 10-13-1892 Throws : Right
                Born In: Benton Harbor, Michigan Height : 5-11
                Died On: 05-09-1964 Weight : 175
                Died In: Kalamazoo, Michigan First Game: 06-24-1915
                College: None Attended Last Game: 06-24-1915
                Nickname: None Draft: Not Applicable

                Chris Burkham's whole MLB career consisted of one pinch hitting appearance for the Browns on June 24, 1915. Chris struck out and then rode of into the Land of Gone for Good. - Chris Burkam, a real Moonlight Graham Society guy, died at age 71 in 1964. - BCT/GB, Chris Burkham!



                Deaths on October 13



                Scrappy Moore
                Birth Name: William Allen Moore Bats : Right
                Born On: 12-16-1892 Throws : Right
                Born In: St. Louis, Missouri Height : 5-08
                Died On: 10-13-1964 Weight : 153
                Died In: Little Rock, Arkansas First Game: 06-21-1917
                College: Vanderbilt & Georgia Tech Last Game: 07-05-1917
                Nickname: Scrappy Draft: Not Applicable

                3rd baseman Scrappy Moore was 1 for 8 (.125) in 4 games for the 1917 Browns before hokking it out to the Land of Gone for Good. - Scrappy Moore was 71 when he died in 1964. - BCT/GB, Scrappy Moore!



                Jack Knott
                Birth Name: John Henry Knott Bats : Right
                Born On: 03-02-1907 Throws : Right
                Born In: Dallas, Texas Height : 6-02½
                Died On: 10-13-1981 Weight : 200
                Died In: Brownwood, Texas First Game: 04-13-1933
                College: Southern Methodist University Last Game: 05-15-1946
                Nickname: None Draft: Not Applicable

                Pitcher Jack Knott won 40 and lost 56 in 6 seasons for the 1933-1958 Browns. Over his total MLB career (1933-1942, 1946), Knott finished with a record of 82-103 and an ERA of 4.97. - Jack Knott was 74 when he died in 1981.

                Today's Reference Links ... http://www.baseballlibrary.com/baseb...logy/today.stm

                http://www.baseball-almanac.com/
                Last edited by Bill_McCurdy; 10-13-2005, 06:18 PM.
                "Our fans never booed us. - They wouldn't dare. - We outnumbered 'em." ... Browns Pitcher Ned Garver.

                Comment


                • October 14th - 2nd Time Around

                  On This Date in History!



                  October 14, 1902-1953: Nothing Apparently Happened.

                  If a tree falls in the forest, and there's no one there to hear it, does it make a sound?



                  A Browns Record Booker

                  Question: Who was the first Brown to lead the American League in runs batted in?

                  Hint: He shared this famous actor's original surname.

                  Answer: The correct answer is 2nd baseman Del Pratt, who led the American League with 103 RBI during the 1916 season while playing for the 5th place Browns (79-75). Pratt was no relation to movie actor Boris Karloff, who changed his name for the screen from William Henry Pratt. In 1916, when Del Pratt had his big season, Karloff's first monster year was several years in the future.



                  Births on October 14



                  Bert Gallia
                  Birth Name: Melvin Allys Gallia Bats : Right
                  Born On: 10-14-1891 Throws : Right
                  Born In: Beeville, Texas Height : 6-00
                  Died On: 03-19-1976 Weight : 165
                  Died In: Devine, Texas First Game: 09-04-1912
                  College: St. Mary's University Last Game: 07-31-1920
                  Nickname: None Draft: Not Applicable

                  Pitcher Bert Gallia was one of the two Browns born and raised in my birthplace hamlet of Beeville, Texas. The other was Lefty Lloyd Brown. - Bert Gallia had a 20-21 record over 3 seasons with the 1918-1920 Browns. For his 9 season career with the Senators, Browns, and Phillies (1912-1920), Gallia's record was 66 wins, 68 losses, and an ERA of 3.14. Bert's best years were with the 1915-1916 Senators when he went 17-11 and 17-12. - Bert Gallia was 84 when he passed away in 1976.



                  Harry Brecheen

                  "Harry The Hat"

                  Birth Name: Harry David Brecheen Bats : Left
                  Born On: 10-14-1914 Throws : Left
                  Born In: Broken Bow, Oklahoma Height : 5-10
                  Died On: 01-17-2004 Weight : 160
                  Died In: Bethany, Oklahoma First Game: 04-22-1940
                  College: East Central University Last Game: 09-13-1953
                  Nickname: Harry The Cat Draft: Not Applicable

                  11 season Cardinal great pitcher Harry "The Hat" Brecheen (1940, 1943-1952) finished his MLB career with a 12th season played as a member of the 1953 Browns. Brecheen's record for the '53 Browns was 5-13, 3.07. His career big league stats include 133 wins, 92 losses, and an ERA of 2.92.



                  Deaths on October 14



                  Bill Reidy
                  Birth Name: William Joseph Reidy Bats : Right
                  Born On: 10-09-1873 Throws : Right
                  Born In: Cleveland, Ohio Height : 5-10
                  Died On: 10-14-1915 Weight : 175
                  Died In: Cleveland, Ohio First Game: 07-21-1896
                  College: None Attended Last Game: 07-01-1904
                  Nickname: None Draft: Not Applicable

                  Pitcher Bill Reidy had a 6-year MLB record (1896, 1899, 1901-1904) of 27 wins and 41 losses with an ERA of 4.17. - Rediy was among the 1901 Brewers who became an original Brown when the franchise was shifted from Milwaukee to St. Louis in 1902. In 2 seasons with the Browns (1902-1903), Reidy had a record of 4 wins and 9 losses. - Bill Reidy 42 when he died in 1915.



                  Clyde Southwick
                  Birth Name: Clyde Aubra Southwick Bats : Left
                  Born On: 11-03-1886 Throws : Right
                  Born In: Maxwell, Iowa Height : 6-00
                  Died On: 10-14-1961 Weight : 180
                  Died In: Freeport, Illinois First Game: 08-22-1911
                  College: Iowa State College of Agricultural & Mechanical Arts Last Game: 09-09-1911
                  Nickname: None Draft: Not Applicable

                  Catcher Clyde Southwick went 3 for 12 (.250) with no homers in 4 games for the 1911 Browns and then hit the trail for the Land of Gone for Good. - Clyde Southwick was 75 when he died in 1961. - BCT/GB, Clyde Southwick!



                  Denny Galehouse



                  Birth Name: Dennis Ward Galehouse
                  Nickname: Denny
                  Born On: 12-07-1911
                  Born In: Marshallville, Ohio
                  Zodiac: Sagittarius
                  Died On: 10-14-1998
                  Died In: Doylestown, Ohio
                  Cemetery: Chestnut Hills Cemetery, Doylestown, Ohio
                  College: None Attended
                  Bats: Right
                  Throws: Right
                  Height: 6-01
                  Weight: 195
                  First Game: 04-30-1934 (Age 22)
                  Last Game: 05-03-1949
                  Draft: Not Applicable

                  Pitcher Denny Galehouse had a 15-season MLB career (1934-1944, 1946-1949), winning 109, losing 118, and registering an ERA of 3.97. In 5 plus seasons with the Browns (1941-1944, 1946-1947), Galehouse won 50 and lost 58. - Denny Galehouse was 86 when he died in 1998.


                  Today's Reference Links ... http://www.baseballlibrary.com/baseb...logy/today.stm

                  http://www.baseball-almanac.com/

                  Have a Great Weekend of NLCS/ALCS Baseball, Everybody!
                  Last edited by Bill_McCurdy; 12-07-2005, 06:12 AM.
                  "Our fans never booed us. - They wouldn't dare. - We outnumbered 'em." ... Browns Pitcher Ned Garver.

                  Comment


                  • October 15th - 2nd Time Around

                    On This Date in History!



                    October 15, 1910: Justice for Jack! Browns Fire O'Connor for Lajoie Sham!

                    "I get by with a little help from my friends." - Nap Lajoie.

                    The St. Louis Browns today fired manager Jack O'Connor for his role in the Lajoie batting title travesty. The club also terminated coach Harry Howell for allegedly trying to bribe E.V. Parrish, the official scorer, into changing his error call on a bunt attempt by Lajoie into a hit. - On the last day of the season, Nap Lajoie of Cleveland and Ty Cobb of Detroit had been involved in a heated battle for a Chalmers automobile that the company planned to award to the winner of the American League batting title. Browns manager O'Connor decided to help Lajoie in his struggle with the generally hated Cobb by playing his 3rd baseman deep so that the Ohio city batter could bunt safely each time he batted. Word got around fast about the obvious chicanery and today the embarrassed Browns did exactly what they had to do. - By the way, Cobb won the batting title over Lajoie, .385 to .384, but Nap came out OK on the auto competition. Noting the controversy, Chalmers ended up giving cars to both men.



                    A Browns Record Booker

                    Question: Who was the second Brown to win the American League batting average title?

                    "... Let's not always see the same hands!"

                    Answer: George Sisler, of course, is the right answer on this one. Sisler's .407 BA in 1920 won him the second American League batting title in Browns history. - (Remember? George Stone was the first Brownie batting champion when he hit .358 back in 1906.)



                    Births on October 15



                    Emil Frisk
                    Birth Name: John Emil Frisk Bats : Left
                    Born On: 10-15-1874 Throws : Right
                    Born In: Kalkaska, Michigan Height : 6-01
                    Died On: 01-27-1922 Weight : 190
                    Died In: Seattle, Washington First Game: 09-02-1899
                    College: None Attended Last Game: 04-23-1907
                    Nickname: The Silent Norseman Draft: Not Applicable

                    Emil Frisk was 8-10 with an ERA of 4.15 as a pitcher for the 1899 Reds and 1901 Tigers. Frisk then switched to oufield, returning to play 2 seasons for 1905 and 1907 Browns. - Frisk batted .267 with no homers over his 4=season, try-anything career. - Emil Frisk was 47 when he died in 1922.



                    Charley O'Leary
                    Birth Name: Charles Timothy O'Leary Bats : Right
                    Born On: 10-15-1882 Throws : Right
                    Born In: Chicago, Illinois Height : 5-07
                    Died On: 01-06-1941 Weight : 165
                    Died In: Chicago, Illinois First Game: 04-14-1904
                    College: None Attended Last Game: 09-30-1934
                    Nickname: None Draft: Not Applicable

                    Utility player Charlie O'Leary was one of our technical Browns, After a 10 year career with other clubs (1904-1913), O'Leary appeared in one game as a gimmicky pinch hitter at age 51 years, 11 months, and 15 days for the Browns on September 30, 1934 - a full 30 years after his rookie season. - Hey! The old man singled and later came around to score as the oldest MLB to that time who'd ever done so. - Charlie O'Leary died in 1941 at age 58.



                    Dolly Gray
                    Birth Name: Samuel David Gray Bats : Right
                    Born On: 10-15-1897 Throws : Right
                    Born In: Van Alstyne, Texas Height : 5-11
                    Died On: 04-16-1953 Weight : 175
                    Died In: McKinney, Texas First Game: 04-19-1924
                    College: None Attended Last Game: 09-18-1933
                    Nickname: Sad Sam Draft: Not Applicable

                    Pitcher Dolly Gray enjoyed a 10-year MLB career with the Athletics (1924-1927) and Browns (1928-1933), posting a career mark of 111 wins, 115 losses, and an ERA of 4.18. Gray had a Browns record alone of 67 wins and 82 losses. His best record year came as a member of the 1928 Browns when "Not-So-Sad-Sam" Gray won 20, lost 12, while recording an ERA for the season of 3.19. - Dolly Gray was 55 when he died in 1953.



                    Deaths on October 15



                    Tom Ferrick

                    Tom Ferrick's '51 Yankees Bowman Card

                    Birth Name: Thomas Jerome Ferrick Bats : Right
                    Born On: 01-06-1915 Throws : Right
                    Born In: New York, New York Height : 6-02½
                    Died On: 10-15-1996 Weight : 220
                    Died In: Lima, Pennsylvania First Game: 04-19-1941
                    College: None Attended Last Game: 09-28-1952
                    Nickname: None Draft: Not Applicable

                    Pitcher Tom Ferrick's MLB career (1941-1952) included two stints with the Browns (1946, 1949-1950). He finished his big league time with a record of 40 wins, 40 losses, and an E.R.A. of 3.47. - Tom Ferrick passed away in 1996 at the age of 81.

                    Today's Reference Links ... http://www.baseballlibrary.com/baseb...logy/today.stm

                    http://www.baseball-almanac.com/
                    Last edited by Bill_McCurdy; 10-15-2005, 06:41 AM.
                    "Our fans never booed us. - They wouldn't dare. - We outnumbered 'em." ... Browns Pitcher Ned Garver.

                    Comment


                    • October 16th - 2nd Time Around

                      On This Date in History!



                      October 16, 1951: Browns' Ned Garver Proposes Salary Scale & Player Options.

                      "We could've finished last without you!" - Bill Veeck.

                      In written proposal to MLB officials, St. Louis Browns pitcher Ned Garver offers a pay plan which he says will help offset the ill effects of the reserve clause system. Garver suggests that the salaries of players on consistently bad teams (Wonder which teams Ned had in mind?) be determined by a rating system established by the owners. A club holding the contract on such a player would retain the option of keeping him by matching the "average" salary established for the position he plays. If the club does not match the "average" salary, then that player will have a right to request a trade to some other club that can afford his services. Garver adds that he "doesn't care where I play, as long as I get a ‘fair' salary."

                      Ned Garver was 26 years old when he drafted these ideas in 1951. He was coming off a year in which he had won 20 games for a last place Browns club that had lost 102. He was well on his way to a tough negotiation with Browns owner Bill Veeck over his expected salary for 1952. Remember the famous story that arises from his request for a raise from Veeck? Veeck refuses to give Garver a raise for 1952, supposedly telling Garver that he cannot justify giving him more money because of where the team finished in 1951. In other Veeck words (parapahrased): "So what if you won 20 games! We still ended the season in the American League cellar! - We could've finished last without you!"

                      Ned Garver's proposal contained some fair suggestions, but, of course, it was ignored by the ownership-dominated power structure of MLB in 1951 . Then as now, it isn't building a case for equity that causes change in the way MLB does business, but the players' power to leverage ownership income potential that turns the wheels of new policy. In 1951, players had no more power than the wagging tale of the big ownership dog. In 2005, players are now very powerful because of free agency and the Players Union. Today, many baseball observers will argue that - the tail now wags the dog.



                      October 16, 1911: Browns Take City Series from Cardinals.



                      At Sportsman's Park in St. Louis today, the Browns whipped the Cardinals, 5–1, to sweep the City series with five wins. The first game ended in a scoreless tie. - Heading into the autumn of 1911, the final outcome of the Browns-Cardinals rivalry for the hearts and wallets of St. Louisans is still 42 years way.



                      A Browns Record Booker

                      Question: Who was the second Brown to lead the American League in total hits for one season?

                      "... same ole same ole!"


                      Answer: George Sisler was the man. His257 hits in 1920 established a big league record that would stand for 84 years. It was broken in 2004 by Ichiro Suzuki of the Seattle Mariners. Ichiro collected 262 hits last year. - (Remember again - George Stone was the first Brownie AL season hit total leader when he banged out 187 safeties back in 1905.)



                      Births on October 16



                      Goose Goslin

                      The Goose.

                      Birth Name: Leon Allen Goslin Bats : Left
                      Born On: 10-16-1900 Throws : Right
                      Born In: Salem, New Jersey Height : 5-11½
                      Died On: 05-15-1971 Weight : 185
                      Died In: Bridgeton, New Jersey First Game: 09-16-1921
                      College: None Attended Last Game: 09-25-1938
                      Nickname: Goose Draft: Not Applicable

                      Hall of Fame outfielder Goose Goslin had an MLB career (1921-1938) BA of .316 with 248 HR's. Goose was a productive member of the Browns for 3 seasons (1930-1932), hitting .326, .328, and .329 as a full time player. - Goose Goslin was 70 when he passed away in 1971.



                      Boom-Boom Beck
                      Birth Name: Walter William Beck Bats : Right
                      Born On: 10-16-1904 Throws : Right
                      Born In: Decatur, Illinois Height : 6-02
                      Died On: 05-07-1987 Weight : 200
                      Died In: Champaign, Illinois First Game: 09-22-1924
                      College: None Attended Last Game: 09-26-1945
                      Nickname: Elmer The Great Draft: Not Applicable

                      Pitcher Boom Boom Beck (1924, 1927-1928, 1933-1934, 1939-1945) posted a career record of 38 wins, 69 losses, and an ERA of 4.30. Beck was 3-3 during his 3 break-in seasons with the Browns (1924, 1927-1928). - Boom-Boom Beck most likely picked up that "Elmer The Great" nickname from a popular 1930s baseball movie of that title, starring comedian Joe E. Brown. - Boom Boom Beck 82 when he died in 1987.



                      Matt Batts

                      ... "I'm Batts, Man!"

                      Birth Name: Matthew Daniel Batts Bats : Right
                      Born On: 10-16-1921 Throws : Right
                      Born In: San Antonio, Texas Height : 5-11
                      Died On: Still Living Weight : 200
                      Died In: Still Living First Game: 09-10-1947
                      College: Baylor University Last Game: 05-08-1956
                      Nickname: None Draft: Not Applicable

                      Catcher Matt Batts hit .302 with 5 homers in 248 times at bat for the 1951 Browns. For his 10-year MLB career (1947-1956), Batts hit .269 with 26 HR's. Today, in 2005, Matt is celebrating his natality. - Happy 84th Birthday, Matt Batts!



                      Bob Cain
                      Birth Name: Robert Max Cain Bats : Left
                      Born On: 10-16-1924 Throws : Left
                      Born In: Longford, Kansas Height : 6-00
                      Died On: 04-08-1997 Weight : 165
                      Died In: Cleveland, Ohio First Game: 09-18-1949
                      College: None Attended Last Game: 09-11-1954
                      Nickname: Sugar or Bob Draft: Not Applicable

                      Pitcher Bob Cain was the second "Sugar Cain" in Browns history. The other ambi-dextrose Cain was an earlier hurler named Merritt Cain (See "Births on April 5.") - Bob Cain's most memorable moment came as a Detroit Tiger pitching against the Browns on August 19, 1951. By pitching to Eddie Gaedel of the Browns, Bob Cain became the only pitcher in MLB history to face a midget batter in an official game. In the process, he also became the only MLB pitcher to ever walk a midget batter. - Bob Cain's 5-year MLB record (1949-1953) included 37 wins, 44 losses, and an ERA of 4.50. As a member of the 1952-1953 Browns, Cain won 16 and lost 20. - Bob Cain was 72 when he died in 1997.



                      Deaths on October 16



                      Dave Davenport
                      Birth Name: David W. Davenport Bats : Right
                      Born On: 02-20-1890 Throws : Right
                      Born In: DeRidder, Louisiana Height : 6-06
                      Died On: 10-16-1954 Weight : 220
                      Died In: El Dorado, Arkansas First Game: 04-17-1914
                      College: None Attended Last Game: 09-01-1919
                      Nickname: None Draft: Not Applicable

                      Pitcher Dave Davenport joined the Browns in 1916 from the St. Louis Terriers following the collapse of the Federal League. Over the course of his 4 seasons as a Brown (1916-1919), Davenport won 41 and lost 50. For his whole MLB career (1914-1919), Davenport won 73, lost 83, and marked a 2.93 ERA. In his best season, the Louisiana native was 22-18, with a 2.20 ERA for the 1915 Terriers. - Dave Davenport was 64 when he died in 1954.



                      Sled Allen
                      Birth Name: Fletcher Manson Allen Bats : Right
                      Born On: 08-23-1886 Throws : Right
                      Born In: West Plains, Missouri Height : 6-01
                      Died On: 10-16-1959 Weight : 180
                      Died In: Lubbock, Texas First Game: 05-04-1910
                      College: None Attended Last Game: 08-05-1910
                      Nickname: None Draft: Not Applicable

                      Sled Allen was one of those Brownie short-timers with a directional nickname. After going 3 for 23 (.130 BA) with no homers for the 1910 Browns, catcher Allen's MLB career slid straight down the hill to The Land of Gone for Good. - Sled Allen was 73 when he passed away in 1959. - BCT/GB, Sled Allen!



                      Ellis Kinder

                      Ellis Kinder had his best year when he went 23-6 for the 1949 Red Sox.

                      Birth Name: Ellis Raymond Kinder Bats : Right
                      Born On: 07-26-1914 Throws : Right
                      Born In: Atkins, Arkansas Height : 6-00
                      Died On: 10-16-1968 Weight : 195
                      Died In: Jackson, Tennessee First Game: 04-30-1946
                      College: None Attended Last Game: 05-08-1957
                      Nickname: Old Folks Draft: Not Applicable

                      Pitcher Ellis Kinder posted a career MLB record of 102 wins, 71 losses, and an ERA of 3.43 over a career that spanned from 1946 to 1957. Kinder broke into the majors with the 1946-1947 Browns and went 11-18 in those two seasons. - Kinder was only 64 at the time of his 1968 death.

                      Today's Reference Links ... http://www.baseballlibrary.com/baseb...logy/today.stm

                      http://www.baseball-almanac.com/
                      Last edited by Bill_McCurdy; 10-17-2005, 05:43 AM.
                      "Our fans never booed us. - They wouldn't dare. - We outnumbered 'em." ... Browns Pitcher Ned Garver.

                      Comment


                      • October 17th - 2nd Time Around

                        On This Date in History!



                        October 17, 1953: Veeck Takes Job with Cubs.

                        "How would you feel about an exploding scoreboard, Mr. Wrigley?"

                        Bill Veeck, Jr. wasted no time filing for unemployment. Today he accepted a job as "special adviser" to owner Phil Wrigley of the Chicago Cubs. By taking the position, Veeck returns to the club that his father, Bill Veeck Sr., served as president back in the 1930's. - The Cubs could use some "special advisory" help. They haven't been to a World Series in 8 years - and they haven't won one since 1908. Wow! That's 45 big seasons of futility. Maybe Veeck will help the Cubbies end the drought.



                        A Browns Record Booker

                        Question: Who was the first Browns pitcher to lead the American League in season wins?

                        Urban Shocker.

                        Answer: The great righthander Urban Shocker was the man. Shocker won 27 games in 1921 to tie Carl Mays of the New York Yankees for most wins during the season.



                        Births On October 17



                        Ernie Wingard
                        Birth Name: Ernest James Wingard Bats : Left
                        Born On: 10-17-1900 Throws : Left
                        Born In: Prattville, Alabama Height : 6-02
                        Died On: 01-17-1977 Weight : 176
                        Died In: Prattville, Alabama First Game: 05-01-1924
                        College: University of Alabama Last Game: 09-25-1927
                        Nickname: None Draft: Not Applicable

                        Ernie Wingard was a 4-season pitcher for the Browns (1924-1927), registering a career mark in that time of 29 wins, 43 losses, and an ERA of 4.64. - Ernie Wingard was 76 when hed died in 1977. - BCT/GB, Ernie!:atthepc



                        Deaths on October 17



                        Jack Powell
                        Birth Name: John Joseph Powell Bats : Right
                        Born On: 07-09-1874 Throws : Right
                        Born In: Bloomington, Illinois Height : 5-11
                        Died On: 10-17-1944 Weight : 195
                        Died In: Chicago, Illinois First Game: 06-23-1897
                        College: None Attended Last Game: 09-24-1912
                        Nickname: Red Draft: Not Applicable

                        Pitcher Jack Powell was the most prolific hurler in Browns history, setting and holding many club pitching records, including most franchise starts (264), most franchise complete games (210), most franchise career shutouts (27), and most franchise career strikeouts (884). Powell was a Brown for two tours of duty (1902-1903 and 1905-1912). For his total career (1897-1912), Jack Powell won 245 games, lost 245 games, and he recorded an ERA of 2.97. - The great Jack Powell was 70 when he died in 1944.



                        Al Clancy
                        Birth Name: Albert Harrison Clancy Bats : Right
                        Born On: 08-14-1888 Throws : Right
                        Born In: Santa Fe, New Mexico Height : 5-10½
                        Died On: 10-17-1951 Weight : 175
                        Died In: Las Cruces, New Mexico First Game: 06-20-1911
                        College: None Attended Last Game: 06-25-1911
                        Nickname: None Draft: Not Applicable

                        3rd baseman Al Clancy had a 5-day MLB career. He played 2 games in the field and had one pinch hit at bat in a third and final game for the Browns in 1911. He went 0 for 5 and only reached base once on an HBP that ultimately left him stranded on the bases and headed down that well-marked path to The Land of Gone For Good. - Al Clancy was 63 when he died in 1951. - BCT/GB, Al Clancy! - There's no crying in baseball - and no tears in Heaven because all the Starbuck's there come free!



                        Jim Delahanty
                        Birth Name: James Christopher Delahanty Bats : Right
                        Born On: 06-20-1879 Throws : Right
                        Born In: Cleveland, Ohio Height : 5-10½
                        Died On: 10-17-1953 Weight : 170
                        Died In: Cleveland, Ohio First Game: 04-19-1901
                        College: None Attended Last Game: 05-08-1915
                        Nickname: None Draft: Not Applicable

                        Jim Delahanty played several positions in a 13 season big league career (1901-1902, 1904-1912, 1924-1915), hitting for a final average of .283 with 19 homers. In 33 games for the 1907 Browns, Delahanty hit only .221 with 0 homers. - Jim Delahanty was 74 when he died in 1953.



                        Bob Swift


                        Bob Swift: Long-Time
                        Tiger Started Out As
                        A St. Louis Brown.


                        Birth Name: Robert Virgil Swift Bats : Right
                        Born On: 03-06-1915 Throws : Right
                        Born In: Salina, Kansas Height : 5-11½
                        Died On: 10-17-1966 Weight : 180
                        Died In: Detroit, Michigan First Game: 04-16-1940
                        College: None Attended Last Game: 09-27-1953
                        Nickname: None Draft: Not Applicable

                        Catcher Bob Swift had a 14 year career as a major league catcher (1940-1953), starting out with 2.5 years with the Browns. Then, after 1.5 seasons with the Athletics, Swift moved on from 1944 to 1953 and his 10-year run with the Tigers. For the most part, Swift played in a back up role. His 130 games as a rookie for the 1940 Browns and his 113 games for the 1948 Tigers were the only 2 seasons of 14 in which Swift played 100 games or more. - Swift finished his career with a BA of .231 and only 14 homers in 2,750 times at bat. - Bob Swift will die young, passing away at the age of 51 in 1966.



                        Hank McDonald
                        Birth Name: Henry Monroe McDonald Bats : Right
                        Born On: 01-16-1911 Throws : Right
                        Born In: Santa Monica, California Height : 6-03
                        Died On: 10-17-1982 Weight : 200
                        Died In: Hemet, California First Game: 04-16-1931
                        College: None Attended Last Game: 09-30-1933
                        Nickname: None Draft: Not Applicable

                        Old McDonald had no form,
                        And he didn't last long.


                        The BR/TR pitcher was 0 and 4 for the 1933 Browns after coming over from the A's early in the season, where he had attained a 1-1 record with Philly. McDonald went 2 and 4 in his only previous season for the '31 A's, leaving the majors with a career mark of 3-9 and ERA of 5.87. After 1932 he was gone. McDonald went "E-Eye-E-Eye-Oh" at the age of 81 in Hemet, California on October 17, 1982. - BCT/GB, Mr. McDonald.

                        Today's Reference Links ... http://www.baseballlibrary.com/baseb...logy/today.stm

                        http://www.baseball-almanac.com/
                        Last edited by Bill_McCurdy; 10-17-2005, 06:21 PM.
                        "Our fans never booed us. - They wouldn't dare. - We outnumbered 'em." ... Browns Pitcher Ned Garver.

                        Comment


                        • October 18th - 2nd Time Around

                          On This Date in History!



                          October 18, 2005: The Spirit of a St. Louis Browns Warrior Never Dies!





                          Yesterday I had a nice phone visit with Frank Mancuso, one of the catchers on the 1944 Browns American League championship club. Frank's an old friend who would be in my life had he never played an inning for the Browns. Our moms used to grocery shop together when I was growing up in the Houston east end neighborhood known as Pecan Park. Frank is 20 years older than me and I can hardly remember the time when I didn't know his name. At 87, Frank is as passionate as ever about baseball.

                          Frank still believes that the '44 Browns should have taken the Cardinals in that Series, but he gives the National Leaguers credit for winning it fair and square. - Frank's playing time was limited in the '44 World Series because of a back injury, but he still managed to go 2 for 3 as a pinch hitter - and that's a fact that still makes him beam with pride. Who can blame him? How many players are there who can look back and say that they hit .667 in the World Series?

                          I asked Frank about the poor fan turnout for the Friday, October 29, 1944 doubleheader at Sportsman's Park against the Yankees on the last weekend of the season. Only 13,000 people showed up on Friday, but the place was packed by Sunday for the final game. The Browns had to win four games against the Yankees that weekend while hoping that the Tigers would slip at home in four games against the Senators. The Browns started the weekend a game back of the Tigers, but they did manage to go 4-0 in the series with the Yankees while the Tigers were splitting 2-2 with the Senators. The math on this one is simple. The results of that weekend gave the Browns the AL pennant by one game over the Tigers and launched them on their first and only trip to the World Series - a 4-2 losing effort against the Cardinals.

                          Frank recalled the poor attendance at the start of the Yankees series. "We knew we had to win all four games against the Yankees to have a chance and not many people thought we could do it. After we won the first three games against the Yankees, people started to believe and came to see us."

                          The bandwagon effect is not a new thing in baseball.

                          Mancuso offered that the '44 Browns had another motivation going for them. He says that they were inspired by their outrage over some comments that national radio broadcasting commentator Bill Stern made about the Browns late in the pennant race. I don't have the details, but Frank says that Stern accused the Browns of laying down on the field for money fed to them by gamblers. "That really made us mad and fired us up," Mancuso says. "When we finally won the thing," he added, "Stern apologized." That apology apparently put the matter to rest and everybody moved on. Wow! If Bill Stern had done that sort of thing in 2005, it's doubtful he would've ended the problem with an on-the-air apology, but the world was a little different place back in 1944.

                          Mancuso also recalls the '44 World Series as one of many strikeouts on both sides. "There was some great pitching in that Series," he adds, "but those pitchers were aided by all those white shirts on the fans in the outfield bleachers. It was very hard to pick up the ball in that kind of background."

                          The Browns haven't played in a World Series in 61 years now, but the spirit of one Browns warrior lives on. - May God bless and keep you safe, Frank Mancuso. You are one of our St. Louis Browns treasures.



                          A Browns Record Booker

                          Question: Who was the second Brown to lead the American League in runs batted in?

                          Ken Williams

                          Answer: Ken Williams is the man. Ken's 155 RBI in 1922 marked the 2nd time that a Browns player led the AL in runs batted in. Del Pratt did it the first time in 1916 when his 103 RBI topped all AL batters.



                          Births on October 18



                          Burt Shotton

                          As a manager, Burt Shotton favored the Connie Mack style dugout attire!

                          Birth Name: Burton Edwin Shotton Bats : Left
                          Born On: 10-18-1884 Throws : Right
                          Born In: Brownhelm, Ohio Height : 5-11
                          Died On: 07-29-1962 Weight : 175
                          Died In: Lake Wales, Florida First Game: 09-13-1909
                          College: None Attended Last Game: 04-21-1923
                          Nickname: Barney Draft: Not Applicable

                          Outfielder Burt Shotton is best remembered as the man who took over as manager of the Brooklyn Dodgers upon the suspension of Leo Durocher in 1947, but he also had a Browns-connected playing career. Over the course of his 14 years as an MLB player (1909, 1911-1923), Shotton batted .271 with 9 homers. Shotton was a Brown for 8 seasons (1909, 1911-1917). He was 77 when he passed away in 1962.



                          Jack Gilligan
                          Birth Name: John Peter Gilgen Bats : Both
                          Born On: 10-18-1885 Throws : Right
                          Born In: Chicago, Illinois Height : 6-00
                          Died On: 11-19-1980 Weight : 190
                          Died In: Modesto, California First Game: 09-16-1909
                          College: None Attended Last Game: 07-04-1910
                          Nickname: None Draft: Not Applicable

                          Pitcher Jack Gilligan was 1-5 with a 4.33 ERA in two seasons for the 1909-1910 Browns and was then gone for good from the big leagues. - Jack Gilligan was 95 when he passed away in 1980. - BCT/GB, Jack Gilligan!



                          Roy Cullenbine
                          Birth Name: Roy Joseph Cullenbine Bats : Both
                          Born On: 10-18-1913 Throws : Right
                          Born In: Nashville, Tennessee Height : 6-01
                          Died On: 05-28-1991 Weight : 190
                          Died In: Mt. Clemens, Michigan First Game: 04-19-1938
                          College: None Attended Last Game: 09-28-1947
                          Nickname: None Draft: Not Applicable

                          Outfielder Roy Cullenbine had a 10-year (1938-1947) MLB career in which he batted .276 with 110 HR's. As a 3-year Brown (1940-1942), Cullenbine batted .317 with 9 homers in 1941, his only season as a full-time player for St. Louis. - Roy Cullenbine was 77 when he died in 1991.



                          Loy Hanning
                          Birth Name: Loy Vernon Hanning Bats : Right
                          Born On: 10-18-1917 Throws : Right
                          Born In: Bunker, Missouri Height : 6-02
                          Died On: 06-24-1986 Weight : 175
                          Died In: Anaconda, Missouri First Game: 09-20-1939
                          College: None Attended Last Game: 07-25-1942
                          Nickname: None Draft: Not Applicable

                          Pitcher Loy Hanning had a career mark of 1 win, 0 losses, and an ERA of 6.26 for the 1939 and 1942 Browns during his only 2 seasons in the big leagues. - Loy Hanning was 68 when he died in 1986.



                          Deaths on October 18



                          Charlie Starr
                          Birth Name: Charles Watkin Starr Bats : Unknown
                          Born On: 08-30-1878 Throws : Right
                          Born In: Pike County, Ohio Height : 5-10½
                          Died On: 10-18-1937 Weight : 165
                          Died In: Pasadena, California First Game: 04-29-1905
                          College: None Attended Last Game: 08-19-1909
                          Nickname: None Draft: Not Applicable

                          Infielder Charlie Starr enjoyed a 110-game MLB career (1905, 1908-1909), batting .211 with 0 HR's. - As a member of the 1905 Browns, Starr batted .206 (20 for 97). - Charlie Starr was 59 when he died in 1937.



                          Al Widmar

                          God Rest His Soul! Al Widmar Died Today - October 18, 2005!

                          Birth Name: Albert Joseph Widmar Bats : Right
                          Born On: 03-20-1925 Throws : Right
                          Born In: Cleveland, Ohio Height : 6-03
                          Died On:10-18-2005 Weight : 185
                          Died In: Tulsa, Oklahoma Game: 04-25-1947
                          College: None Attended Last Game: 04-17-1952
                          Nickname: None Draft: Not Applicable


                          Al Widmar died today, October 18, 2005 at the age of 80. Pitcher Widmar had a 5-year big league career (1947-1948, 1950-1952), finishing with 13 wins, 30 losses, and an ERA of 5.21. Even though Widmar started out with the 1947 Red Sox and ended up with the 1952 White Sox, all of his decisions were registered with the Browns (1948, 1950-1951). Here's a link to a story on his death that was published on October 19, 2005 by the Boston Globe. ...

                          http://www.boston.com/news/globe/obi...+--+Obituaries

                          Thank you, forum member "runningshoes53" for informing us of Al's passing on October 30, 2005.

                          Today's Reference Link ... http://www.baseball-almanac.com/
                          Last edited by Bill_McCurdy; 10-30-2005, 03:15 PM.
                          "Our fans never booed us. - They wouldn't dare. - We outnumbered 'em." ... Browns Pitcher Ned Garver.

                          Comment


                          • October 19th - 2nd Time Around

                            On This Date in History!



                            October 19, 1964: Rickey Nears End of Line With Cardinal Dismissal.

                            "Luck is the residue of design." - Branch Rickey.

                            82 year old Branch Rickey moves ever closer to the end of the line. His formal baseball career effectively ended today when we was fired from his $65,000 per year consulting job with the St. Louis Cardinals. The former brain child manager of the St. Louis Browns who was lost originally to the Cardinals in 1917 because of ego issues with American League club owner Phil Ball doesn't have much fiber left on his string. A Hall of Fame member because of his baseball genius and leadership courage on the the breaking of the color line, Branch Rickey will pass away on December 9, 1965.



                            A Browns Record Booker

                            Question: In what season did the Browns lead the American League in six (6) major individual statistical categories?

                            Reproduction of 1922 Browns Cap.

                            Answer: You guessed it right. It was 1922 - the year of the Browns' close miss on the American League pennant. - George Sisler led the American League in 1922 with a .420 Batting Average, 134 Runs Scored, and 246 Hits. - Ken Williams was the leader with 155 Runs Batted In and 39 Home Runs. - Pitcher Urban Shocker paced all others with 149 Strikeouts. - No wonder the Browns' failure to win it all was such a vast disappointment. Those guys had the horses to get it done. - It just wasn't meant to be.



                            Births on October 19



                            Tim McCabe
                            Birth Name: Timothy J. McCabe Bats : Right
                            Born On: 10-19-1894 Throws : Right
                            Born In: Ironton, Missouri Height : 6-00
                            Died On: 04-12-1977 Weight : 190
                            Died In: Ironton, Missouri First Game: 08-16-1915
                            College: None Attended Last Game: 07-27-1918
                            Nickname: None Draft: Not Applicable

                            Pitcher Tim McCabe won 5, lost 1, and posted a career ERA of 2.92 in 4 seasons for the 1915-1918 Browns. - Tim McCabe was 82 when he died in 1977.



                            Mike Meola
                            Birth Name: Emile Michael Meola Bats : Right
                            Born On: 10-19-1905 Throws : Right
                            Born In: New York, New York Height : 5-11
                            Died On: 09-01-1976 Weight : 175
                            Died In: Fair Lawn, New Jersey First Game: 04-24-1933
                            College: None Attended Last Game: 09-16-1936
                            Nickname: None Draft: Not Applicable

                            Pitcher Mike Meola had a 42 innings, 2-year MLB career (1933-1936) with the Red Sox and Browns. Meola's record for the 1936 Browns was 0-1, 9.36 and his career mark was 0-3, 8.16. - Mike Meola 70 when he died in 1976.



                            Deaths on October 19



                            Grover Hartley
                            Birth Name: Grover Allen Hartley Bats : Right
                            Born On: 07-02-1888 Throws : Right
                            Born In: Osgood, Indiana Height : 5-11
                            Died On: 10-19-1964 Weight : 175
                            Died In: Daytona Beach, Florida First Game: 05-13-1911
                            College: None Attended Last Game: 09-30-1934
                            Nickname: Slick Draft: Not Applicable

                            Catcher/Infielder Grover had a 14 year MLB career (1911-1917, 1924-1927, 1929-1930, 1934) that became protracted over time because of some brief appearances as an older player. He hit .268 with 3 HR's in a career that included two stops as a Brown (1916-1917 and 1934 for 3 AB's). - Grover Harley was 76 when he died in 1964.



                            George Bradley
                            Birth Name: George Washington Bradley Bats : Right
                            Born On: 04-01-1914 Throws : Right
                            Born In: Greenwood, Arkansas Height : 6-01½
                            Died On: 10-19-1982 Weight : 185
                            Died In: Lawrenceburg, Tennessee First Game: 04-28-1946
                            College: None Attended Last Game: 05-13-1946
                            Nickname: None Draft: Not Applicable

                            Center fielder George Washington Bradley went 2 for 12 (.167) with 3 RBIs in 3 games for the 1946 Browns and then became a gone-for-gooder from the big league scene. Unlike his famous namesake, our April Fool's Day "GW" was first in nothing when it came to big league baseball record setting. - George Washington Bradley was 67 when he died in 1982.

                            Today's Reference Links ... http://www.baseballlibrary.com/baseb...logy/today.stm

                            http://www.baseball-almanac.com/
                            Last edited by Bill_McCurdy; 10-30-2005, 02:07 PM.
                            "Our fans never booed us. - They wouldn't dare. - We outnumbered 'em." ... Browns Pitcher Ned Garver.

                            Comment


                            • October 20th - 2nd Time Around

                              On This Date in History!



                              October 20, 1901: Browns Begin Life in St. Louis with Raid on Cardinals Roster!

                              "Human Crab" Walks Sideways to Browns in 1902!

                              Seven members of the St. Louis Cardinals, including their three top hitters - Jesse "The Human Crab" Burkett, Emmet Heidrick, Bobby Wallace - and half the redbird pitching staff, all are jumping to the new St. Louis American League team. - Moving to the Mound City from Milwaukee in time for rebirth in 1902 as the St. Louis Browns, the former Brewers are coming to town to battle the National League Cardinals for the hearts and wallets of local cranks. - The Cardinals had better be careful they don't get run out of town by their new competition. - These new Browns look and act as though they mean to take over the city. - By grabbing away the Cardinals' best players, the pressure for the National League to recognize the new American League and come to some mutual agreement against roster raids is now ratcheted full bore. - Neither circuit can afford a long-term war that destroys the hearts of their rosters and ultimately drives up player salaries. Plus, many owners reason, the longer the players are allowed to behave as though they have choices about where they work, the harder it will be for owners to restore a reserve clause system that protects and perpetuates the plantation mentality of big league baseball.



                              A Browns Record Booker

                              Question: What Browns outfielder led the American League in total hits over the course of the 1928 season?

                              Heinie Manush.

                              Answer: The answer is Heinie Manush. Future Hall of Famer Manush collected 241 hits in 1928 to pace all American League batters.



                              Births on October 20



                              No Runs. No Hits. No Browns.



                              Deaths on October 20



                              Ed Kusel
                              Birth Name: Edward Daniel Kusel Bats : Unknown
                              Born On: 02-15-1886 Throws : Right
                              Born In: Cleveland, Ohio Height : 6-00
                              Died On: 10-20-1948 Weight : 165
                              Died In: Cleveland, Ohio First Game: 09-18-1909
                              College: None Attended Last Game: 10-01-1909
                              Nickname: None Draft: Not Applicable

                              Ed Kusel wasn't around long enough for history to record his batting preference on the left or right sides of the plate. Too bad too. Ed went 3 for 10 (.300) in his only big league year with the 1909 Browns. - As a righthanded pitcher for the 1909 Browns, unfortunately, Kusel had 0 wins, 3 losses, and an ERA of 7.13 - a performance that launched him quickly down the road to the Land of Gone for Good. - Ed Kussel passed away in 1948 at the age of 62. - Eddie, we hardly knew ye. - BCT/GB, Ed Kusel!



                              John Whitehead
                              Birth Name: John Henderson Whitehead Bats : Right
                              Born On: 04-27-1909 Throws : Right
                              Born In: Coleman, Texas Height : 6-02
                              Died On: 10-20-1964 Weight : 195
                              Died In: Bonham, Texas First Game: 04-19-1935
                              College: None Attended Last Game: 05-13-1942
                              Nickname: Silent John Draft: Not Applicable

                              Pitcher John Whitehead had an MLB career (1935-1940, 1942) record of 49 wins, 54 losses, and an ERA of 4.60 that was achieved mostly with the Chicago White Sox. As a Brown (1939-1940, 1942), Whitehead won only 2 against 6 losses. - Silent John Whitehead was silent forever in 1964 at the age of 55.

                              Today's Reference Links ... http://www.baseballlibrary.com/baseb...logy/today.stm

                              http://www.baseball-almanac.com/
                              Last edited by Bill_McCurdy; 10-20-2005, 04:55 PM.
                              "Our fans never booed us. - They wouldn't dare. - We outnumbered 'em." ... Browns Pitcher Ned Garver.

                              Comment


                              • Death on October 21

                                Former Brown catcher Harry Chapman

                                Born:10/26/1887 Severance, Kansas
                                Died:10/21/1918 Nevada, Missouri
                                Batted: Right Threw: Right
                                Height: 5'11 Weight: 160
                                Major League Debut: 10/6/1912
                                Last game: 7/19/1916

                                Harry Chapman was a former catcher with the Cubs, Cardinals, and Browns. Chapman played the 1914 and 1915 seasons with the Federal League's St. Louis Terriers, where he compiled his best years statistically.

                                Chapman was a lifetime .198 hitter with 1 HR and 44 RBI. In 18 games with the Browns in 1916, Chapman batted .097 with 0 HR and 0 RBI.

                                Comment

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