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  • #46
    September 13th

    September 13, 1922: Sisler Out; Pennant Drive & Hitting Streak in Jeopardy. The St. Louis Browns announce that George Sisler has severely strained ligaments and cannot lift his right arm over his head. He might be out for the remainder of the season, jeopardizing the Browns' pennant chances and Sisler's 39-game hitting streak. Ironically, the injury occurred when Sisler tried to catch a throw on a hit by Ty Cobb, whose streak he is trying to break. Without Sisler, the Browns rally to beat the Detroit Tigers, 8–6. Bay Doll Jacobson, playing 1st base, makes two errors.

    September 13, 1909: Browns "Help" Cobb Achieve Rare Record. Ty Cobb clinches the American League home run title with his 9th round-tripper. It is an inside-the-park drive against the St. Louis Browns. In fact, all of Cobb's nine home runs this '09 season are inside-the-park jobs, including two on July 15th. Ty Cobb is the only player in the 20th century to lead his league in home runs without hitting a single ball out of the park. Only Sam Crawford (12 in 1901) has hit more inside-the-park homers in a single year than Cobb attains this season. - Well, there's another record that we may safely assume is now safe forever. No way it can happen again in 2004. Eh, it's too late. Now, as for the prospects of either league's HR leader hitting only inside-the-parkers in 2005, don't bet the ranch. Don't even bet a washer from a faucet in one of the bathrooms in the ranch.

    September 13, 1908: Waddell Halts Tigers. St. Louis Browns pitcher Rube Waddell gives up a Detroit run in the first when Ty Cobb triples home Matty McIntyre, but Rube ties the game himself when he singles a run home in the 2nd. Waddell allows nothing after the 1st and the Browns win, 2-1, when Syd Smith singles in the winning run in the bottom of the 11th.

    ... a Rube Waddell link ... http://www.baseballlibrary.com/baseb...ddell_Rube.stm

    ... a Syd Smith link ... http://www.baseballlibrary.com/baseb.../Smith_Syd.stm

    Today's General Reference Link ... http://www.baseballlibrary.com/baseb...logy/today.stm
    "Our fans never booed us. - They wouldn't dare. - We outnumbered 'em." ... Browns Pitcher Ned Garver.

    Comment


    • #47
      September 14th

      September 14, 1950: Browns On A Roll. "Browns On A Roll" may read like a recipe for the club being served up as an appetizer for pennant hungry contenders per usual. True as that usually was most of the time, including the bulk of the '50 season, the Browns are on a different kind of roll this week. They are rolling like an armored tank. The St. Louis Browns stretch their win streak to eight games by beating the Boston Red Sox, 6–3, for only their second win over the Beantowners in twenty games this year to date. The Browns' eight game win streak is the longest for the club since their 1944 American League championship year. Their defeat today drops the Bosox two games behind the Yanks. Ted Williams is the bright spot for Boston. With his fractured elbow now healed, Williams pinch hits in the eighth inning. Teddy Ballgame responds by cracking out a double. In spite of this positive flurry, the Browns will go on to finish 7th in 1950 with a final season record of 58-96.

      September 14, 1934: "If At 1st You Don't Succeed, Try, Try Again!" Bobo Newsom of the St. Louis walks the first 4 batters he faces and promptly departs the first game of a doubleheader with the Philadelphia Athletics. The Browns will lose to the A's, 9-7, in the first game. Not to be long discouraged, Newsom starts the seond game too. This time he begins with 4 straight strikeouts as the Browns go on to win a sply by a 5-2 score.

      ... a Bobo Newsom link ... http://www.baseballlibrary.com/baseb...ewsom_Bobo.stm

      September 14, 1921: Big Train Hits Browns. Washington's Walter Johnson gives up three hits but still faces just 27 batters in edging the Browns 1–0. Following two singles in the 4th, George Sisler's line drive is turned into a triple play. Jack Tobin singles in the 7th, but Johnson picks him off. Tobin will set a American League record this year with 179 singles, a mark that Sam Rice will top in 1925.

      ... a Jack Tobin link ... http://www.baseballlibrary.com/baseb...Tobin_Jack.stm
      Last edited by Bill_McCurdy; 09-14-2004, 04:36 AM.
      "Our fans never booed us. - They wouldn't dare. - We outnumbered 'em." ... Browns Pitcher Ned Garver.

      Comment


      • #48
        September 15th

        September 15, 1950: The Return of Ted Williams. Ted Williams returns to the Boston Red Sox starting lineup. He blasts a home run and three singles in a 12–9 Boston victory over the St. Louis Browns. The Red Sox will come within two games of the first place Yankees this week, but will end up in third place, behind both New York and Detroit.

        September 15, 1944: Stern Warning Denied. Radio announcer Bill Stern reports on a scandal involving the St. Louis Browns. A Chicago newspaper attributes the Browns' recent slump to the fact that the team wants a larger park for the World Series. (Go figure. We don't have all the details on this little tale-wagging whirlpool without further research, but think about the quality of this logic as it flows to us in summary form. Would losing enough games to miss the World Series altogether help a club get a larger ballpark built for a team that was trying to get to the big show for the first time in 43 years?) Four days after the Chicago story breaks, Bill Stern repudiates the notion that it was ever true.

        For those who don't remember him, Bill Stern in the 1940's was to sports what Dan Rather is to general news today. You had to take anything he said with a whole box of Morton's Salt to find a bias-free grain of truth.

        September 15, 1922: On The Way To Heartbreak Ridge. The St. Louis Browns pull to within a half game of the New York Yankees, who are losers to the Chicago White Sox, by rallying to beat the Boston Red Sox, 7–1. Elam Vangilder scatters five hits to get the win. St. Louis trailed, 1–0, after six and a half innings before coming back.

        September 15, 1907: Wrong Way To History. Enter Rod Serling for an introduction to this one: "The man we see walking down the street, the well-dressed, portly fellow with the big cigar, and even bigger smile, is Mr. Hugo Dusenberg, an ordinary St. Louis baseball fan. ... A kind and jolly type, by nature, Hugo is especially happy today because there's a hint of autumn in the air and he's on his way to a Browns baseball game. ... Little does Hugo suspect at this moment in time - that he's about to do something today that will guarantee his place forever in ... the twilight zone of baseball history."

        At the Browns-Tigers game in St. Louis, a soda bottle thrown by a fan, Hugo Dusenberg, fells umpire Billy Evans. The crowd beats up Hugo before the police come to his rescue. Dusenberg is fined $100. Evans is carried from the field and hospitalized, but he is not seriously injured.
        Last edited by Bill_McCurdy; 09-15-2004, 04:55 AM.
        "Our fans never booed us. - They wouldn't dare. - We outnumbered 'em." ... Browns Pitcher Ned Garver.

        Comment


        • #49
          Originally posted by Bill_McCurdy
          [B]
          September 15, 1944: Stern Warning Denied. Radio announcer Bill Stern reports on a scandal involving the St. Louis Browns. A Chicago newspaper attributes the Browns' recent slump to the fact that the team wants a larger park for the World Series. .
          Could it have been that it was the American League that wanted the Browns to not win (supposedly)? Because as you point out, the Browns were gonna play in their own stadium, if they won.

          As of the 15th, the Yanks were right in the race, and the Stadium would certainly hold bigger crowds than Sportsman's Park.

          Comment


          • #50
            "Could it have been that it was the American League that wanted the Browns to not win (supposedly)? Because as you point out, the Browns were gonna play in their own stadium, if they won." - Westsidegrounds
            I don't know, WSG. The brief report only referred to the team's wishes, not the league's. It would be interesting to know how much difference it made to the other 14 clubs about who played in the World Series. I'm not sure how much the other clubs shared in the WS gate back in 1944. Also, there was no TV money and I doubt seriously if radio rights spread much money, if any, to the 14 "losers."

            If anyone out there can shed some light for us here on this Stern issue, please do so. Sometimes short reports are all we need to know. In this instance, we got just enough information to be confounded.
            "Our fans never booed us. - They wouldn't dare. - We outnumbered 'em." ... Browns Pitcher Ned Garver.

            Comment


            • #51
              September 16th

              September 16, 1944: Browns Recapture Lead. Jack Kramer's one-hitter against the Chicago White Sox propels the St. Louis Browns back into first place in the American League.

              ... a Jack Kramer link ... http://www.baseballlibrary.com/baseb...ramer_Jack.stm

              September 16, 1940: "Lucky" Lucadello! Rookie Johnny Lucadello of the St. Louis Browns hits home runs from each side of the plate versus the New York Yankees in a 16-4 St. Louis Browns win. Only Wally Schang, in 1916, had accomplished the same in the American League. Mickey Mantle will become the next AL player to do it in 1995. Adding to the supposition of rookie luck is the fact these are the only HRs Lucadello will hit all year. :atthepc

              ... a Johnny Lucadello link ... http://www.baseballlibrary.com/baseb...llo_Johnny.stm

              September 16, 1922: Showdown in St. Louis. Pennant fever rages in St. Louis, as the New York Yankees come to town with a half-game lead. Bob Shawkey outpitches Urban Shocker 2–1, as George Sisler ties Ty Cobb's 1911 record by hitting in his 40th straight game. While chasing a fly ball in the 9th, New York OF Whitey Witt is hit in the head and knocked cold by a soda bottle thrown from the bleachers.* American League President Ban Johnson will initially offer a $1,000 reward for the name of the bottle-thrower. To calm the crowds, the American League offers the less plausible theory that Witt stepped on the bottle as he was running and that it flew up and hit him. The incident leads to a ban on the sale of bottled drinks in ballparks.

              * No reports on the location of aging Browns fan Hugo Dusenberg on this particular occasion. If you read yesterday's posts for this date in Browns history, you immediately will understand why Dusenberg's name comes to mind as one of "the usual suspects."

              ... Today's General Reference Link ... http://www.baseballlibrary.com/baseb...logy/today.stm
              "Our fans never booed us. - They wouldn't dare. - We outnumbered 'em." ... Browns Pitcher Ned Garver.

              Comment


              • #52
                September 17th

                September 17, 1931: A Bad News Browns Afternoon. In the first of two, the New York Yankees and Red Ruffing rough up the St. Louis Browns and George Blaeholder, 17–0. Bill Dickey's grand slam is the big blow. The Yanks also take the nitecap, 6–1, behind Lefty Gomez's three hitter and Babe Ruth's 41st and 42nd homers of the year. Makes you wonder. How do you suppose the Brownies spent the rest of that day, once they finally got away from the ballpark?

                ... a George Blaeholder link ... http://www.baseballlibrary.com/baseb...der_George.stm

                September 17, 1925: Dog Day Afternoon. This date in Browns history seems to be chocked full of redundancy and double failure. Unfortunately, September 17th is not an isolated case. Behind hurlers Ted Wingfield and Paul Zahniser, the Boston Red Sox shut out the St. Louis Browns twice, winning 2–0 and 4–0.

                September 17, 1922: Those Unruly St. Louis Fans Again. St. Louis Browns southpaw Hub Pruett, who has fanned Babe Ruth in 9 of 10 times of contest with each other this season, is finally touched for a home run by the Bambino. Pruett holds on to beat the Yankees, 5–1. Yankee outfielder Whitey Witt, who was hit in the head with a flying bottle yesterday, receives an ovation, but the partisan crowd in center field at Sportsman's Park is quick to wave white hankies in the 8th inning for Yanks pinch-hitter Norm McMillan. Police make them stop. .... What? ... What? ... :noidea ... At any rate, George Sisler has a single to extend his hitting streak to 41 games.

                ... a Hub Pruett link ... http://www.baseballlibrary.com/baseb...Pruett_Hub.stm

                September 17, 1916: Sisler's Last Mound Victory. St. Louis Browns pitcher George Sisler wins out, 1–0, over Walter Johnson of the Washington Senators. It is the last win of Sisler's pitching careeer, as his batting prowess soon dictates him a place in the starting everyday lineup as a first baseman. Sisler also will play two games as a left-handed third baseman before his days of moving around are done. Over the course of his career, George Sisler compiled a pitching record of 5 wins, 6 losses, and an E.R.A. of 2.35. He appeared in 24 games as a pitcher, completing 9 of the 12 starts that he had.
                Last edited by Bill_McCurdy; 09-17-2004, 04:57 AM.
                "Our fans never booed us. - They wouldn't dare. - We outnumbered 'em." ... Browns Pitcher Ned Garver.

                Comment


                • #53
                  September 18th

                  September 18, 1951: Byrne Slams Sens. In the first of two games today, St. Louis Browns pitcher Tommy Byrne hits a grand slam off the Washington Senators Sid Hudson in the 9th inning to ice the game, 8-0. It's the first grand slam for the Browns this year. In the nitecap, Byrne cracks a 10th-inning pinch single to give the Browns a 3–2 victory.

                  ... a Tommy Byrne link ... http://www.baseballlibrary.com/baseb...yrne_Tommy.stm

                  September 18, 1938: Details Would've Been Helpful! Although they drop a doubleheader today to the St. Louis Browns, the New York Yankees clinch the pennant. (Assume that the NY magic number over Boston or Cleveland was down to 1 or 2 - and that the chaser club also lost their game or even a DH. The Yankees end up winning the 1938 American League pennant by 9.5 games over Boston. So, it was pretty much downhill for the contenders from this date that the Yankees clinched. Again, it would've been helpful to have found some details on how the Browns double-dosed New York today. :grouchy

                  September 18, 1934: More Bad Luck for Bobo & The Browns. Bobo Newsom of the St. Louis Browns continues a run of unusual bad luck, losing a no-hitter after getting two outs in the 10th inning. Two walks and a single produce the game's only run as Wes Ferrell of the Boston Red Sox hurls a 10-hit shutout, 1-0.

                  ... a Bobo Newsom link ... http://www.baseballlibrary.com/baseb...ewsom_Bobo.stm

                  September 18, 1922: That Pennant-Fatal Day. New York's Whitey Witt, his head bandaged from being hit by a bottle, drives in two in the 9th for a 3–2 Yankee win over the St. Louis Browns at Sportsman's Park. The win allows New York to leave St. Louis with a 1.5 game lead over the Browns. The Yankees will finish one game on top, clinching the pennant on the 30th of September with a 3–1 win in Boston. More bad news today: George Sisler's 41-game hitting streak is stopped by New York's Joe Bush, the same pitcher he had started the streak against on July 27th.

                  ... Today's General Reference Link ... http://www.baseballlibrary.com/baseb...EPTEMBER18.stm
                  Last edited by Bill_McCurdy; 09-18-2004, 11:26 AM.
                  "Our fans never booed us. - They wouldn't dare. - We outnumbered 'em." ... Browns Pitcher Ned Garver.

                  Comment


                  • #54
                    September 19th

                    September 19, 1922: Ken Williams Gets HR #39. Against the Washington Senators and Walter Johnson, Ken Williams crushes his 39th and final home run of the year in the 4th inning. Pat Collins, subbing for the still hurting George Sisler at 1B, adds another solo home run in the 7th to give the St. Louis Browns a 2–1 lead. Unfortunately, the Senators rally to win, 4-3, with Walter Johnson earning the win over Elam Vangilder. Sisler pinch hits, but strikes out. If it seems as though the Browns are contstantly facing Walter Johnson, that's only because they are, but so is everyone else. With each club having only 7 opponents in the "old days," you see your foes much more often and you play them more games per season. Throw in the fact that clubs go with 4-man rotations, sometimes even use their great starters more often, while also using their great ones in relief and - what do you get? If you're the Browns, you get to see guys like Walter Johnson more often than you do your unemployed and not-really-looking-all-that-hard-for-new-work brother-in-law. :atthepc

                    ... a Ken Williams link ... http://www.baseballlibrary.com/baseb...ams_Ken233.stm

                    ... a Pat Collins link ... http://www.baseballlibrary.com/baseb...ollins_Pat.stm

                    September 19, 1920: Browns Not Intimidated By Movie Star Ruth. In New York, Babe Ruth's movie opens at Madison Square Garden. It has been retitled Heading Home. In St. Louis, the Browns show no respect for the Bambino's debut as a movie star. They beat the New York Yankees, 6–1.

                    Today's General Reference Link ... http://www.baseballlibrary.com/baseb...EPTEMBER19.stm
                    Last edited by Bill_McCurdy; 09-19-2004, 07:50 AM.
                    "Our fans never booed us. - They wouldn't dare. - We outnumbered 'em." ... Browns Pitcher Ned Garver.

                    Comment


                    • #55
                      September 20th

                      September 20, 1924: Browns Derail Old Train. Pitching on two days rest in St. Louis, the great veteran Walter Johnson is pounded out of the box by the Browns and pinch hit for in the 2nd. Each team collects 18 hits as the St. Louis Browns outslug and under-wobble the Washington Senators, 15–14. Goose Goslin gives Washington a 14–13 lead in the 10th with his 2nd home run of the game, but a wild throw to 2nd in the bottom of the 10th by reliever Firpo Marberry gives the win to the Browns.

                      September 20, 1923: NY Clinches 3rd AL Pennant Against Browns. It is only a baby of a dynasty, but make no mistake. It is a baby dynasty that is starting to make all the other clubs cry. The New York Yankees clinch their 3rd straight pennant today, beating the St. Louis Browns, 4–3, to pad their big lead to 18 games. Their final margin this year will be 16.

                      September 20, 1908: Browns Derail New Train. Little do they know on this day, but they only have about 1,000 more years ahead of them to deal with this routine menace. Today things go well. Behind the 17 strikeouts bagged by starter Rube Waddell, the St. Louis Browns defeat young Walter Johnson and the Washington Nationals (aka Senators) in 10 innings by a score of 2-1. :atthepc

                      Today's General Reference Link ... http://www.baseballlibrary.com/baseb...EPTEMBER20.stm
                      Last edited by Bill_McCurdy; 09-20-2004, 08:34 AM.
                      "Our fans never booed us. - They wouldn't dare. - We outnumbered 'em." ... Browns Pitcher Ned Garver.

                      Comment


                      • #56
                        September 21st

                        September 21, 1935: Tigers Clinch Pennant on Brown Carpet Ride. The Detroit Tigers clinch the American League pennant with a double win over the St. Louis Browns today, winning 6–2 and 2–0. Eldon Auker wins the nitecap with a complete game shutout, while Tommy Bridges takes the opener. The Tigers will coast the rest of the way, going 1–6, while the Yankees will go 6–1. No report is provided on the Browns' last week, but it doesn't matter. They aren't going anywhere, anyway. :o

                        September 21, 1933: Senators Clinch Pennant Against Browns. With lefty Walter Stewart pitching, the Washington Senators eliminate the New York Yankees and clinch the American League pennant in a 2–1 home win over the St. Louis Browns. Any claims the Senators embrace for their years of hardship are too often exploded by their sporadic escapes from mediocrity. Their 1933 AL crown is their 3rd league championship. The Sens will go on to lose the '33 World Series to the New York Giants in 5 games. Ten years earlier, however, Washington had defeated the Giants to take the '24 Series in 7. The following year, the Senators turned a back-to-back AL pennant run, but lost the '25 Series in 7 games to the Pittsburgh Pirates.

                        September 21, 1928: Ruffing Roughs Up Browns. At St. Louis, Boston's Red Ruffing smashes a 3-run homer in the 7th and pitches the Red Sox to a 5–3 win over the Browns. ..... Ouch!

                        September 21, 1922: Sisler Named AL MVP. The American League reinstates the MVP award, last given in 1914, appointing a committee of one writer from each city, headed by I.E. Sanborn of the Chicago Tribune. As a player-manager, Ty Cobb is not eligible, and the trophy is awarded to George Sisler of the St. Louis Browns. The National League will pick up the idea two years later.

                        September 21, 1908: Baked Brownies Are Footnotes in Baseball History: The Cleveland Naps take the American League lead, beating the New York Highlanders, while the Detroit Tigers take two from the Browns at St. Louis. With two weeks to go, 3.5 games separate four teams. The Tigers will go on from here to win the 1908 AL crown by a mere half game over Cleveland. Had the Browns split their DH with Detroit today, Cleveland would've won the AL pennant and been the team to face the Chicago Cubs in the 1908 World Series. - Who knows? Maybe Cleveland would've beaten the Cubs. Then we wouldn't have to be constantly reminded that 1908 was the last time the Cubs ever won a World Series. Instead, we'd be reminded that 1907 was the last time the Cubs ever won it all. - Apply these same rules of "what might have been" to your own life sometime and see what you come up with.

                        :atthepc

                        Today's General Reference Link ... http://www.baseballlibrary.com/baseb...EPTEMBER21.stm
                        Last edited by Bill_McCurdy; 09-21-2004, 05:16 AM.
                        "Our fans never booed us. - They wouldn't dare. - We outnumbered 'em." ... Browns Pitcher Ned Garver.

                        Comment


                        • #57
                          Originally posted by Bill_McCurdy
                          [B]September 21, 1908: Baked Brownies Are Footnotes in Baseball History: The Cleveland Naps take the American League lead, beating the New York Highlanders, while the Detroit Tigers take two from the Browns at St. Louis. With two weeks to go, 3.5 games separate four teams. The Tigers will go on from here to win the 1908 AL crown by a mere half game over Cleveland...
                          The '08 National League race was also one that should be remembered-Giants, Cubs, and Pirates fighting it out all summer. "Merkles's Boner" forced a one game playoff, Cubs v. Giants. The Series was rather an anti-climax after the regular season. The 1908 regular season may have the most exciting on record for big league baseball.

                          Comment


                          • #58
                            September 22nd

                            September 22, 1935: Earl Dukes Detroit. The St. Louis Browns use fresh face Earl Caldwell, recently called up from San Antonio of the Texas League, to defeat the league-leading Detroit Tigers, 1–0, on three hits. Schoolboy Rowe is the loser. Rowe's error in the 6th allows the only run. Caldwell isn't a rookie. He pitched briefly with Philadelphia in the National League back in 1928 and he will hang around the major leagues for about the equivalent of eight full seasons before finally hanging it up after 1948.

                            ... an Earl Caldwell link ... http://www.baseballlibrary.com/baseb...dwell_Earl.stm

                            September 22, 1911: Browns Go: 000 000 000 000 000 000. It's another double dip downer day as starters Jim Scott and Frank Lange of the Chicago White Sox both apply whitewashes to the St. Louis Browns. The White Sox win the double bill by scores of 5–0 and 1–0.

                            September 22, 1909: Original Browns Manager Steps Down. Jimmy McAleer of the St. Louis Browns, one of the American League's original managers, resigns today after eight years at the helm. McAleer will take over as the new deep thinker of the Washington Nationals.

                            ... a Jimmy McAleer link ... http://www.baseballlibrary.com/baseb...leer_Jimmy.stm

                            ... Today's General Reference Link ... http://www.baseballlibrary.com/baseb...EPTEMBER22.stm
                            Last edited by Bill_McCurdy; 09-22-2004, 11:00 AM.
                            "Our fans never booed us. - They wouldn't dare. - We outnumbered 'em." ... Browns Pitcher Ned Garver.

                            Comment


                            • #59
                              September 23rd

                              September 23, 1933: Browns Lose to Tigers; Tigers Lose Manager. Despite the 5th-place Detroit Tigers' 5–3 win over the St. Louis Browns, manager Bucky Harris submits his resignation. Del Baker takes over as interim manager of the Tigers at the every end and goes 2-0. Although Babe Ruth's name will be prominent in the newspapers as a possible replacement, the '34 Tiger job will go to Mickey Cochrane. The Browns are merely wallpaper to this story and, for the most part, to this date in baseball history, at least, as it's currently being reported by our main source. We need to get our hands on the archival files of the St. Louis Post-Dispatch.

                              September 23, 1915: Sisler Relieves. In the first of two games, the New York Yankees shut out the St. Louis Browns, 7–0. George Sisler pitches one perfect inning of relief for St. Louis. Unfortunately, our source apparently felt that we didn't really care about the results of Game Two. As a result, no score is given for the nitecap. Heck! They don't even tell us who won! Baseball history writers should never assume that Browns fans don't want to know. We do want to know. We can handle the truth.

                              In the meanwhile, have a great Browns fan day. - While you're at it, watch out for the goose eggs. Some days are full of them.

                              Today's General(ly Poor) Reference Link ... http://www.baseballlibrary.com/baseb...EPTEMBER23.stm
                              Last edited by Bill_McCurdy; 09-24-2004, 04:20 AM.
                              "Our fans never booed us. - They wouldn't dare. - We outnumbered 'em." ... Browns Pitcher Ned Garver.

                              Comment


                              • #60
                                September 24th

                                September 24, 1933: Anonymous Browns Avoid No No. Detroit's Tommy Bridges reaches the 9th inning with a no-hitter for the 3rd time this season and the 4th time in two years. He yields a pair of hits, as the Detroit Tigers beat the St. Louis Browns, 7–0. Unfortunately, our source fails to reveal the names of the Browns players who ruin Bridges' no-hit bid.

                                September 24, 1921: "Nuthin' To It, You 2004 Wimps!" - Double Duty Davis. St. Louis Browns pitcher Dixie Davis pitches both ends of the doubleheader against the Boston Red Sox, scattering nine hits and losing the opener, 2–1, then coasting to an 11–0 win in the nitecap.

                                What do you suppose Browns manager Lee Fohl was thinking when he made the decision to start Davis in the second game? Maybe something like: "Well, Davis did just pitch nine innings, but he scattered those nine hits he gave up pretty good, even though he lost. Yeah, I may as well start him again in the second game."

                                ... a Dixie Davis link ... http://www.baseballlibrary.com/baseb...avis_Dixie.stm

                                September 24, 1919: White Sox Clinch Against Browns. The Chicago White Sox ride a 6-5 win over the St. Louis Browns to clinch the 1919 American League pennant. The final margin will be 3.5 games over the Cleveland Indians. Does any American League pennant winner ever wrap it up against any club other than the Browns? :noidea

                                The Browns will head from here to the usual shade of off-season anonymity. On the other hand, eight of the White Sox players will head from here to a 1920 lifetime ban from baseball for allegedly doing some very bad things in the 1919 World Series.



                                September 24, 1916: Sisler Loses. In the first game of a doubleheader, St. Louis Browns first baseman George Sisler pitches his second game in eight days, tossing a complete game, but losing, 2–0, to Harry Seibold of the Philadelphia Athletics.

                                Today's General Reference Link ... http://www.baseballlibrary.com/baseb...EPTEMBER24.stm
                                Last edited by Bill_McCurdy; 09-24-2004, 03:34 PM.
                                "Our fans never booed us. - They wouldn't dare. - We outnumbered 'em." ... Browns Pitcher Ned Garver.

                                Comment

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