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  • #61
    September 25th

    September 25, 1944: Tigers & Browns Head to Pennant Wire in Dead Heat. Going into the final Monday of the season, the Detroit Tigers hold a one-game lead over the St. Louis Browns, with the New York Yankees now out of the running. (Gee, that sentence felt funny when I wrote it down, I think I'd better type it in again, just to be sure that we're still not simply dreaming about something that happened sixty years ago.) Going into the final Monday of the season, the Tigers hold a one-game lead over the Browns with the New York Yankees now out of the running. (That's the part that reads wierd, even when you type it twice.) The Browns get big help today from the Men of Connie Mack. Russ Christopher of the Phildadelphia Athletics throttles the Tigers, 2-1, to produce a tie for the lead between the Browns and Detroit. :atthepc

    September 25, 1926: Yankees Clinch Against Browns in Record Time. The New York Yankees do what they usually do. They just do it faster today. New York takes two from the St. Louis Browns to nail down the American League flag, winning the opener 10–2 behind Herb Pennock. Ruth's grand slam is the big blow. In the nitecap, Lou Gehrig homers in the 3rd inning, off Milt Gaston, while Ruth matches him with a 2-run home run in the 6th off Win Ballou. Ruth adds a solo shot in the 9th, his 46th, off Joe Giard to seal the Waite Hoyt 10–4 victory. Despite the score, the game is played in a new American League record 55 minutes. The National League record is 51 minutes, set on September 28, 1919.

    ... a Milt Gaston link ...http://www.baseballlibrary.com/baseb...aston_Milt.stm

    ... a Win Ballou link ... http://www.baseballlibrary.com/baseb...Ballou_Win.stm

    ... a Joe Giard link ... http://www.baseballlibrary.com/baseb.../Giard_Joe.stm

    September 25, 1910: Johnson 1-Hits Browns. Walter Johnson of Washington tosses the first of his two career one-runner games, missing a perfect game when a grounder skips by shortstop George McBride for a single. Johnson's one-hitter is good for a 3–0 victory over the St. Louis Browns. Even though it is early in franchise history, the Browns demonstrate their availability today as the canvas for the masterpiece work of others.

    Have a nice Saturday, everybody!

    Today's General Reference Link ... http://www.baseballlibrary.com/baseb...EPTEMBER25.stm
    Last edited by Bill_McCurdy; 09-25-2004, 06:08 PM.
    "Our fans never booed us. - They wouldn't dare. - We outnumbered 'em." ... Browns Pitcher Ned Garver.

    Comment


    • #62
      September 26th

      September 26, 1953: The Last Brownie Homer. Here's one for your next game of baseball trivia down at the barber shop or hair styling salon, depending on your gender or level of hoi-paloi-ness. I'm a barber shop guy myself. In today's game, Billy Hunter becomes the last St. Louis Browns player to hit an official American League home run. In spite of Hunter's long reach into the final record books of our grieving Brownie Nation, St. Louis loses to the Chicago White Sox, 6-3.

      September 26, 1926: Browns Sweep Yanks in Record-Time for DH. The St. Louis Browns beat the New York Yankees twice today. The 6–1 and 6–2 wins were completed in a total time of only 2 hours, 7 minutes, a major league record for a twin bill. Unless there's a duplicative mistake in our source's reporting, the second game time ties the record established only yesterday for the fastest in American League history at 55 minutes. Man! These guys really want to get this season down and done, don't they?

      In spite of the record time finish, the Yankees total 19 hits on the day, while the Browns collect 26 in the two games. Boy! Do we ever need a time machine to go see this one? How on earth do two clubs collect 45 hits and still manage to finish a doubleheader in a little over two hours??

      Babe Ruth has one at bat in Game Two, then sits, and misses reliever George Sisler, who tosses two scoreless innings to finish for St. Louis. When the Browns score four in the 8th, Sisler picks up the victory.

      On the year, Ruth has 47 homers - over twice the number of runner-up Al Simmons of Philadelphia, who finishes with 19. Ruth also leads the American League in 1926 with 139 runs scored, 155 RBI, and 144 bases on balls. Ruth is batting .372, second to Detroit's Heinie Manush, who will go 6 for 9 on the last day of the '26 season to finish at .378.

      Browns coach Jimmie Austin, 46 years old, participates in the nitecap and contributes to the win by knocking in a run with a double and then stealing home. He is not the oldest to steal a base (Arlie Latham stole one back in 1909 for the New York Giants at the age of 49!*), but he is the oldest to steal home. Latham and Austin, - they represent two more facts for your next trivia game, and here's one more. - The Yankees use Fred Merkle in his final game in the big leagues today. Merkle replaces Lou Gehrig at first base in the 6th inning of Game Two.

      * Baseball Library.Com gives Latham credit for being 50 at the time of his stolen base, but I checked it further and found them to be wrong. Latham was born on March 15, 1860. Therefore, he could only have been 49 during the 1909 season. If he were 50 at the time he stole that base, then he had to have done it during the 1910 season, but that's unlikely. The MacMillan Baseball Encyclopedia lists 1909 as Latham's last season. That's good enough settlement for me on this one.


      September 26, 1920: Thank You For Your Support! An overflowing Sunday crowd of 30,000 fans cram Sportsman's Park to see today's game. I'm not sure what they are giving away to attract such an end of the year crowd. I doubt that it was "George Sisler Bobble Head Day," don't you? At any rate, the fans turn out today for whatever reason, even though the third place Browns are deep on their way to finishing the 1920 season a hopeless 19.5 games behind the pennant winning Cleveland Indians, who also happen to be the Brownie opposition on this festive autumn afternoon.

      Unfortunately for the happy and dedicated fans of St. Louis, the Cleveland Indians spoil things by topping the Browns, 7–5, behind seven innings of strong relief from George Uhle. Joe Sewell knocks home four runs and Steve O'Neill contributes a drive that hits a mounted policeman's horse for a ground rule double. "... What??? ... Ground Rule Double??? ... Ground rule double, my horse's a**!!!" ... Officer Krupke.

      :grouchy

      Today's General Reference Link ... http://www.baseballlibrary.com/baseb...EPTEMBER26.stm
      Last edited by Bill_McCurdy; 09-26-2004, 07:46 AM.
      "Our fans never booed us. - They wouldn't dare. - We outnumbered 'em." ... Browns Pitcher Ned Garver.

      Comment


      • #63
        September 27th

        September 27, 1953: The Lost Hurrah. The St. Louis Browns play both their last game in Sportsman's Park and the last game in the franchise's 52-year history. Fitting their established lore, the Browns lose, 2-1, to Billy Pierce and the Chicago White Sox in 10 innings for their 100th defeat of the season. In the process, reserve first baseman Ed Mickelson drives in Johnny Groth in the 4th inning for the last run and RBI in Browns franchise history. - What follows is the modest parody I wrote about this flicker of life in active Browns play.

        The Lost Hurrah: September 27, 1953
        Chicago White Sox 2 - St. Louis Browns 1.


        (A respectful parody of "Casey At The Bat" by Ernest L. Thayer in application to the last game ever played by our beloved Browns.)

        by Bill McCurdy (1997)

        The outlook wasn't brilliant for the Brownie nine that day;
        They were moving from St. Louis - to a place quite far away,
        And all because Bill Veeck had said, "I can't afford to stay,"
        The team was playing their last game - in that fabled Brownie way.

        With hopes of winning buried deep - beneath all known dismay,
        The Brownies ate their cellar fate, but still charged out to play.
        In aim to halt a last hard loss - in a season dead since May,
        They sent Pillette out to the mound - to speak their final say.

        The White Sox were that last dance foe - at the former Sportsman's Park,
        And our pitcher pulsed the pallor of those few fans in the dark.
        To the dank and empty stands they came, - one final, futile time,
        To witness their dear Brownies reach - ignominy sublime.

        When Mickelson then knocked in Groth - for the first run of the game,
        It was to be the last Browns score, - from here to kingdom came.
        And all the hopes that fanned once more, - in that third inning spree,
        Were briefly blowing in the wind, - but lost eternally.

        For over seven innings then, - Dee bleached the White Sox out,
        And the Browns were up by one to oh, - when Rivera launched his clout.
        That homer tied the score at one, - and then the game ran on.
        Until eleven innings played, - the franchise was not gone.

        But Minnie's double won the game - for the lefty, Billy Pierce,
        And Dee picked up the last Browns loss; - one hundred times is fierce!
        And when Jim Dyck flew out to end - the Browns' last time at bat,
        The SL Browns were here no more, and that was that, - was that!

        Oh, somewhere in this favored land, the sun is shining bright;
        The band is playing somewhere, and somewhere hearts are light;
        And somewhere men are laughing, - and little children shout,
        But there's no joy in Sislerville, - the Brownies have pulled out.

        Other things happened on this day in Browns history, but I will have to cover them later when I have more time. My first attempt to post this date in Browns history resulted in an electronic abortion that cost me about 45-60 minutes of work. Pretty appropriate outcome for an old Brownie fan (and there's that oxymoron again) eh? - Work hard and have it all result in nothing!?!

        Nothing like starting off Monday as an oxymoron! :grouchy

        ... Much later, we shall try to add what got bleeped yesterday by the electronic gremlins ... :grouchy

        September 27, 1944: Browns Argue Selves Into Hole. The St. Louis Browns give the American League lead back to the Detroit Tigers by insisting on playing the Boston Red Sox in the rain under the arcs - and then losing, 4-1. The Red Sox are hapy for the relief. The Sox ended a 10-game losing streak with their victory.

        September 27, 1928: "There's No Place Like Home!" - Dorothy Manush. At St. Louis, Bump Hadley pitches the Washington Senators to a 6–5 win over the St. Louis Browns. Goslin, leading the American League in hitting, is 2 for 4, while his rival, Heinie Manush of the Browns, has one hit, a 3-run home run in the Browns 5-run 9th. Manush has 13 homers this year, all at home. Goslin will go on to edge Manush for the batting average title by the slim margin of .379 to .378.

        ... a Heinie Manush Link ... http://www.baseballlibrary.com/baseb...ush_Heinie.stm

        September 27, 1921: Shocker Shocks Yankees. The St. Louis Browns' Urban Shocker stops the Yankees, 2–0, racking up his 5th win in nine decisions against New York this year. It is Shocker's 27th win of the year and the kind of success that isn't lost upon his vanquished foes. As Shocker continues to thrive over the years, the Yankees stop him in a way that works well often for them over the years. During the 1924-25 off-season, New York will unload a bunch of lesser lights on the Browns in a trade for Shocker.

        September 27, 1915: Sisler in No-Decision Mound Start. St. Louis Browns first baseman George Sisler makes his second pitching start this month. He gets no decision, despite giving up four runs in seven innings. The Boston Red Sox beat St. Louis, 8–4.

        September 27, 1904: Much Adieu About Nothing. In a home start, Willie Sudhoff of the St. Louis Browns squares off against Chief Bender of the Philadelphia Athletics. The two men carry their teams through ten full innings without either club drawing blood. The game ends in a 0-0 tie due to darkness,

        ... a Willie Sudhoff link ... http://www.baseballlibrary.com/baseb...off_Willie.stm

        Today's General Reference Link ... http://www.baseballlibrary.com/baseb...EPTEMBER27.stm
        Last edited by Bill_McCurdy; 09-28-2004, 05:02 AM.
        "Our fans never booed us. - They wouldn't dare. - We outnumbered 'em." ... Browns Pitcher Ned Garver.

        Comment


        • #64
          September 28th

          September 28, 1947: Dizzy Dean Pitches for Browns. On the season's last day, the St. Louis Browns, desperate for a ticket seller, bring announcer Dizzy Dean in to pitch against the Chicago White Sox. Diz gives up only 3 hits in 4 innings and laces a clean single in his only at bat. Unfortunately, a pulled leg muscle forces his early retirement. The White Sox score all their runs in the 9th to win 5-2. Even with Diz pitching, the game draws less than 16,000, and the Browns finish the year with only 320,000 attendance, less than half that of 1946. Three days before the finale, a Browns' game drew only 350. (I refer you to the quote from Ned Garver that I use as my posting tag line on this forum. Things didn't get better at the turnstiles when Garver came along. Any sudden bump up in Brownie attendance during the early '50s proved to be little more than what the stock market calls a dead cat bounce.)

          September 28, 1935: Browns Swept Into Off-Season. The Cleveland Indians sweep the St. Louis Browns with Joe Vosmik (.350) going 1 for 7 at the day's end. He still leads Buddy Myers by two points.

          September 28, 1928: Crowder Crows. At St. Louis, Browns pitcher Alvin Crowder beats his former teammates, the Washington Senators, by a 4–3 count. Crowder finishes the season with the American League's best record, 21 wins against only 5 losses. Crowder will later return to Washington and win 50 games in two years for the "Nats."

          ... an Alvin Crowder link ... http://www.baseballlibrary.com/baseb...er_General.stm

          September 28, 1912: Foul Play. A scant few hundred fans see what some contemporaries called the worst game in American League history as the New York Highlanders trounce the St. Louis Browns, 18–12. The teams accumulate 29 hits, 20 walks, and 12 errors. New York scores in each of seven innings, stealing a record 15 bases - 7 pilfers off catcher Jim Stephens in two innings, followed by eight thefts off Nig Clarke. Hal Chase and Birdie Cree lead the thieves with four steals each. Five Highlanders runners are thrown out.

          September 28, 1903: Red Sox Blank Browns. The Boston Red Sox blank the St. Louis Browns, 6-0, for their 20th shutout of the year.

          Today's General Reference Link ... http://www.baseballlibrary.com/baseb...EPTEMBER28.stm
          Last edited by Bill_McCurdy; 09-28-2004, 09:55 AM.
          "Our fans never booed us. - They wouldn't dare. - We outnumbered 'em." ... Browns Pitcher Ned Garver.

          Comment


          • #65
            [QUOTE=Bill_McCurdy][B][B
            September 28, 1912: Foul Play. A scant few hundred fans see what some contemporaries called the worst game in American League history as the New York Highlanders trounce the St. Louis Browns, 18–12. The teams accumulate 29 hits, 20 walks, and 12 errors. New York scores in each of seven innings, stealing a record 15 bases - 7 pilfers off catcher Jim Stephens in two innings, followed by eight thefts off Nig Clarke. Hal Chase and Birdie Cree lead the thieves with four steals each. Five Highlanders runners are thrown out.
            /QUOTE]


            This was a battle (?) between two teams who finished the season with records of 53-101 (the Brownies, yay!) and 50-102 (John McGraw probably enjoyed reading the AL final standings that year).

            It was not unknown in those days for two teams, playing for nothing at the end of a season, to "have some fun" with the Grand Old Game ... kinda suspect this may have been what was going on here.

            Different times!

            Comment


            • #66
              September 29th

              September 29, 1953: Last Season Ends; Veeck Sells Out. A Baltimore syndicate headed by Baltimore Mayor Tom D'Alesandro buys Bill Veeck's interest in the St. Louis Browns for $ 2,475,000. (Yes, that's 2.475 million only. This was 1953. Today you couldn't buy a lousy middle relief pitcher for that kind of money.) Eager to see him gone, the American League quickly approves the shift of the St. Louis Browns franchise to Baltimore - without Bill Veeck.

              September 29, 1902: First Season Ends; Hope Checks In. The American Season ends with the Philadelphia Athletics winning the pennant, but by only five games over the future-hopeful St. Louis Browns. Philadelphia's Socks Seybold hits 16 home runs in 1902 for the highest season total to lead the American League until a fellow named Babe Ruth comes along and slams an incredible 29 homers in 1919. :atthepc
              Last edited by Bill_McCurdy; 09-29-2004, 04:47 AM.
              "Our fans never booed us. - They wouldn't dare. - We outnumbered 'em." ... Browns Pitcher Ned Garver.

              Comment


              • #67
                September 30th

                September 30, 1951: Garver Wins 20th for Last Place Browns. Preceding the St. Louis Browns' season closer, the Harlem Globetrotters defeat a team led by baseball clown Max Patkin. The basketball game is played on a wooden court set up behind third base. Then St. Louis ace Ned Garver cops his 20th game of the season, defeating the Chicago White Sox, 9–5. Garver (20-12) becomes the only player ever to win 20 for a last place team that loses 100 games, as the Browns win just 32 other times. The '51 Browns finish the American League season in the 8th and last place slot with a record of 52-102 and a full 46 games behind the champion New York Yankees. Garver's achievement gives rise to the story of what happens to him when he later asks Browns owner Bill Veeck for a raise prior to the '52 season because of his 20-win season. Veeck will turn Garver down with this explanation: "We could've finished last without you."

                ... a Max Patkin link ... http://www.baseballlibrary.com/baseb...Patkin_Max.stm

                ... a Ned Garver link ... http://www.baseballlibrary.com/baseb...Patkin_Max.stm

                September 30, 1944: Browns & Tigers in Dead Heat. The St. Louis Browns remain tied with the Detroit Tigers for first place in the American League as Dennis Galehouse goes all the way, winning, 2-0, for his 9th victory of the year. In spite of the down-to-the-wire pennant race, paid attendance at Sportsman's Park today is 12,982.

                September 30, 1928: Goslin Edges Browns' Manush for AL Batting Title. In the Washington Senators' 9–1 win over the St. Louis Browns on this last day of the season, Washington outfielder Goose Goslin, for the 3rd day in a row, gets two hits, one a 9th inning looping single, to edge the Browns outfielder Heinie Manush, .379 to .378. It is Goose's only batting title in his 18-year career. Senator ace Sam Jones volunteers to pitch to stop Manush, while Blaeholder tries the same for St. Louis. Blaeholder gets Goslin in his first two at bats, but Goose then hits a 5th inning home run.

                September 30, 1922: Gloom & Doom in Sislerville. The New York Yankees clinch their 2nd pennant by beating the Boston Red Sox, 3–1, behind Waite Hoyt and Joe Bush. The New York victory over Boston ends the hopes of the Browns hope for a 1st pennant. The '22 Browns will finish 1 game behind the champion Yankees. (Oh well, if the Browns can take the American League in '23 & '24, they will be tied with the Yankees with 2 pennants each.)

                September 30, 1915: Browns Help Red Sox. The Boston Red Sox clinch the American League pennant as St. Louis beats Detroit, giving Boston a 2.5 game margin. The World Series is now set for another Boston-Philadelphia matchup, but with the leagues reversed. In the 1914 World Series, the Boston Braves played the Philadelphia Athletics. This year it will be the Boston Red Sox versus the Philadelphia Phillies.

                Today's General Reference Link ... http://www.baseballlibrary.com/baseb...logy/today.stm
                "Our fans never booed us. - They wouldn't dare. - We outnumbered 'em." ... Browns Pitcher Ned Garver.

                Comment


                • #68
                  October 1st

                  October 1, 1953: Too Late Now To Matter. Bill Veeck resigns today as President of the St. Louis Browns. With the sale of his interests in the club to Baltimore interests and the approved moove of te franchise to that Maryland city, Veeck's actions today are heavily anti-climactic.

                  October 1, 1950: Zernial Bangs 4 HRs on Last Day Against Browns. Gus Zernial of the Chicago White Sox hit one homer in a 4-3 first game win over the visiting St. Louis Browns. He adds three more long balls in the nightcap, a 10-6 loss, to tie an American League record for a twin bill and set a club record with 29 homers, 10 of which came against St. Louis. Zeke Bonura held the Sox homer record with 27, set in 1934, and tied by Joe Kuhel in 1940.

                  October 1, 1944: Browns Win Only Pennant On Final Day! It finally has happened. The Browns win the pennant! What day! The St. Louis Browns celebrate their first sellout crowd in 20 years by bringing home the American League bacon. In full view of the 37,815 fans who pack Sportsman's Park on this day of rare beauty, St. Louis clinches the long-coveted AL flag on the final day of the season by sweeping the New York Yankees and winning today's game by a count of 5-2. The Browns are paced by a pair of 2-run homers by outfielder Chet Laabs. The little used and hard-drinking character known as Sig Jakucki is the winning pitcher on a day when steady results were needed. When it counted in 1944, Jakucki came through with the goods. Sadly, Sig's drinking will win the long game, forcing him out of baseball in 1945.

                  ... a Sig Jakucki link ... http://www.baseballlibrary.com/baseb...akucki_Sig.stm

                  October 1, 1921: Browns Finishing Strong. On the road, the St. Louis Browns beat the Detroit Tigers, 11–6, in 11 innings of their next to final game of the season. Detroit is without Ty Cobb, who was suspended for an over-the-top argument with an umpire a week ago in Washington (though Detroit has not played since the 26th). Detroit's Harry Heilmann is 0 for 5 and down to .396. He'll go 1 for 4 tomorrow, but will lead the American League in hitting with a .394 average.

                  October 1, 1920: Indicted Black Sox Fall To Browns. In their first game following the indictment of eight players for fixing the 1919 World Series, the Chicago White Sox lose to St. Louis, 8-6, while the Cleveland Indians split a pair with the Detroit Tigers. Chicago trails Cleveland by 2 games with 2 games left to play.

                  October 1, 1916: Sandlot Time For Two Unserious Teams. In a 6–3 win over the Detroit Tigers, the St. Louis Browns steal eight bases for a total of 234 steals, an American League season record until the 1976 Oakland Athletics swipe 341. Detroit adds seven steals of its own for a combined team total of 15 steals, tying the American League record for two clubs that the New York Highlanders set by themselves on September 28, 1911.

                  Today's General Reference Link ...http://www.baseballlibrary.com/baseb...logy/today.stm
                  Last edited by Bill_McCurdy; 10-01-2004, 10:12 AM.
                  "Our fans never booed us. - They wouldn't dare. - We outnumbered 'em." ... Browns Pitcher Ned Garver.

                  Comment


                  • #69
                    October 2nd

                    October 2, 1949: "It's A Travestmockery!" In a promotional stunt that (ahem!) seems to place pumping the gate ahead of the integrity of the game, the St. Louis Browns use a different pitcher in each of their 9 innings of play against the Detroit Tigers. Detroit wins 4-3.

                    October 2, 1943: Browns Drop Pair to NY. The New York Yankees take two from the St. Louis Browns, 5-1 and 7-6, for their 14th sweep of a doubleheader, an American League mark. Bud Metheny hits a home run in the opener for only the Yankees' 100th roundtripper of the season.

                    October 2, 1938: Bobo Newsom Wins 20th. Bobo Newsom wins his 20th game for the 7th place St. Louis Browns. Sadly, our source saw no value in reporting the score of the game or which team was the opposition. h

                    ... a Bobo Newsom link ... http://www.baseballlibrary.com/baseb...ewsom_Bobo.stm

                    October 2, 1920: Kerr Beats Browns, But White Sox Lose Pennant Chase. Little Dickie Kerr of the Chicago White Sox beats the St. Louis Browns, 10-7, but the Cleveland Indians also win, 10-1, to clinch the American League pennant.

                    Today's General Link ... http://www.baseballlibrary.com/baseb...logy/today.stm
                    "Our fans never booed us. - They wouldn't dare. - We outnumbered 'em." ... Browns Pitcher Ned Garver.

                    Comment


                    • #70
                      Originally posted by Bill_McCurdy
                      [B]
                      October 2, 1938: Bobo Newsom Wins 20th. Bobo Newsom wins his 20th game for the 7th place St. Louis Browns. ]
                      4-3 over the Sox at Comiskey.

                      Comment


                      • #71
                        October 3rd

                        October 3, 1944: Street Car Series Starts Tomorrow! The Mound City is a abuzz over the start of the All-St. Louis World Series tomorrow afternoon at Sportsman's Park. The National League Cardinals will be the home team in Games 1 and 2. The American League Browns will be the home club in Games 3, 4, & 5 (if there is one). Should the series go the distance, the Cards will take the home team advantage in Games 6 & 7.

                        Mort Cooper (22-7, 2.46) gets the call tomorrow as the Cardinals' opening game starter. In an apparent undermatch, Denny Galehouse (9-10, 3.12) will go for the Browns. Yes, those who cannot get tickets will be able to hear all games on the radio.
                        :radio

                        October 3, 1929: His "Cousin" Is a General. At St. Louis, the Browns General Crowder tops the Indians, 3–2, in 10 innings. Accounting for the Indians scoring is Earl Averill's 2-run home run, his 18th of the year and his 5th off "The General." Only George Kelly's six homers off Vic Aldridge in 1923 (and later on, Ted Williams in 1941, off Johnny Rigney, and Ted Kluszewski in 1954, off Max Surkont) will top Earl's 5, according to homer historian Dave Vincent.

                        October 3, 1920: Sisler's # 257 Sets Season Hit Record. In the St. Louis Browns' 16-7 win over the Chicago White Sox, George Sisler gets his 257th hit of the season to set a major league record. He also hurls a scoreless 9th inning in relief, becoming the only player in baseball history to set a new season hit total and also to pitch in the record-setting game. - Sisler's new record will last a very long time, and way beyond the days of the 154-game season schedule. It will fall in 2004, only two days short of lasting for a full 84 years. Ichiro Suzuki of the Seattle Mariners will break Sisler's record in Game 160 of a 162 game schedule in 2004.

                        October 3, 1908: Browns Blanked. The Detroit Tigers roll to their 10th straight win when Wild Bill Donovan shuts out the St. Louis Browns, 6–0, while the Cleveland Naps lose, 3–2, to the Chicago White Sox. Detroit leads the American League by 1.5 games.

                        Today's General Reference Link ... http://www.baseballlibrary.com/baseb...y/OCTOBER3.stm
                        Last edited by Bill_McCurdy; 10-03-2004, 06:23 AM.
                        "Our fans never booed us. - They wouldn't dare. - We outnumbered 'em." ... Browns Pitcher Ned Garver.

                        Comment


                        • #72
                          October 4th

                          October 4, 1944: McQuinn's HR Paces Browns By Cards In Game 1 of WS! The first all St. Louis World Seris opens with the Browns beating the Cardinals, 2-1, on George McQuinn's 2-run home run. Denny Galehouse is the winning pitcher. Mort Cooper is the loser for the Cardinals in spite of a stellar pitching performance. McQuinn's homer was only one of two hits the Browns managed all day. Galehouse scatters 7 Cardinal hits and goes the distance for the victorious American Leaguers. It is the first World Series in which all the games are played west of the Mississippi River. The Series is dubbed the Streetcar Series and is played with no days off.

                          October 4, 1925: More Fun On Last Day For "Also-Rans": Harry Heilmann of the Tigers bangs out six hits in Detroit's doubleheader sweep of the St. Louis Browns, 10–4 and 11–6, to edge out teammate Ty Cobb for the batting crown, .393 to .389. Cobb bats over .300 for the 20th time. In the second game, the final game of the season, managers George Sisler of the Browns and Ty Cobb of the Tigers both pitch in relief in for the two clubs, won by Detroit 11–6. Cobb is perfect in his one inning, while Sisler holds the Tigers scoreless in two.

                          October 4, 1923: The King of Doubles. Cleveland's Tris Speaker connects against St. Louis the Browns for his 57th double of the season as the visiting Tribe win, 5–1. Speaker's final total of 59 is a record that will be beaten in 1931 by Earl Webb (67), but his career-high 793 (later revised down to 792) is still tops in big league history.

                          October 4, 1912: Tribe in Train Wreck on Way To Play Browns. After playing an exhibition game in Ray Chapman's hometown of Herrin, Illinois, the Cleveland Naps board a train for the season finale in St. Louis against the Browns. The train is involved in an accident near Southwick, Missouri, and, while no players are injured, the engineer is killed. No report is available on how the train wreck effected the playing of the season's last game. My guess is that the clubs went ahead and played the scheduled game, but I don't know that for a fact. Anyone with any information on this incident is encouraged to post forth on this thread.

                          October 4, 1908: Ump's Call Results in Tie Game. In a next-to-last-day game at St. Louis, the Cleveland Naps are forced to settle with a frustrating 3–3 tie with the St. Louis Browns. The outcome is sealed when umpire Jack Egan makes a controversial out call against the Naps at first base. Most observers thought that Bill Hinchman of the Naps beat the 9th inning throw, but umpire Egan's call results in a tie game.

                          (Where are you when we really need you, Post-Dispatch?)

                          Today's General Reference Link ... http://www.baseballlibrary.com/baseb...y/OCTOBER4.stm
                          Last edited by Bill_McCurdy; 10-05-2004, 05:17 AM.
                          "Our fans never booed us. - They wouldn't dare. - We outnumbered 'em." ... Browns Pitcher Ned Garver.

                          Comment


                          • #73
                            Originally posted by Bill_McCurdy
                            [B]
                            [B]
                            [B]
                            October 4, 1908: Ump's Call Results in Tie Game. In a closing game at St. Louis, the Cleveland Naps are forced to settle with a frustrating 3–3 tie with the St. Louis Browns. The outcome is sealed when umpire Jack Egan makes a controversial out call against the Naps at first base. Most observers thought that Bill Hinchman of the Naps beat the 9th inning throw, but umpire Egan's call results in a tie game.

                            OK, now this one smells bad.

                            The Browns finished the 1908 season in 4th place, a not-at-all-terrible 6 1/2 games out, that's all right, BUT

                            Detroit won the pennant with a record of 90-63.

                            Cleveland finished second. 90-64. 1/2 game back.

                            Ya gotta wonder.

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                            • #74
                              That 1908 Season

                              OK, now this one smells bad.

                              The Browns finished the 1908 season in 4th place, a not-at-all-terrible 6 1/2 games out, that's all right, BUT

                              Detroit won the pennant with a record of 90-63.

                              Cleveland finished second. 90-64. 1/2 game back.

                              Ya gotta wonder.

                              ... Westsidegrounds
                              Couldn't agree more, WSG, but I made an error in yesterday's report that I have since corrected in the October 4th post for the sake of those who may read this later. This game was not the last game of the season, as I originally reported. I assumed wrongly that it was the last game because of the October date. My apologies for the error. As you will find from reading the Oct. 5th entries, the Browns and Naps made up for this no-decision on Oct. 4th by playing a doubleheader on Oct. 5th, the real last day of the scheduled season. We still can't tell from the limited data provided by Baseball Library.Com if the second game of this Oct. 5th DH is actually a totally new game - or simply a resumption of the Oct. 4th tie. No matter, as you shall also see on the Oct. 5th post, the Oct. 4th controversy probably did cost Cleveland the 1908 pennant. Instead of getting a win on Oct. 4th, the Indians had to play a DH with the Browns the following day.
                              Last edited by Bill_McCurdy; 10-05-2004, 05:55 AM.
                              "Our fans never booed us. - They wouldn't dare. - We outnumbered 'em." ... Browns Pitcher Ned Garver.

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                              • #75
                                October 5th

                                October 5, 1944: Cards Win, 3-2, in 11; Series Tied with Browns, 1-1. The Streetcar Series is heating up. Nels Potter (19-7, 2.83) started for the Browns against Max Lanier (17-12, 2.65) for the Cards, but neither figured in the final decision. Blix Donnelly (2-1, 2.12) took over for the Cards in the 8th with the scored tied, 2-2. In four innings of pitching, Donnelly struck out 7 Browns and allowed only 3 balls to be hit out of the infield. The Cardinals won in the 11th on a pinch hit single by Ken O'Dea with two runners on. Ray Sanders scores the winning run for the Cards. The Browns hurt themselves early today. Two errors by Potter and one by Mark Christman gave the Cards 2, early-inning, unearned runs. Donnelly picked up the deserved win. Bob Muncrief (13-8. 3.08), who hurled the last 4.1 innings for the Browns, took the loss. With the Series now even at a game each, action continues tomorrow with the Browns now assuming the role of home team at the same old Sportsman's Park against the "visiting" Cardinals.

                                October 5, 1911: When The Pendulum of Power Was "All Owners." Players from the St. Louis Browns and all other big league clubs got another reminder today of who runs things in their labor-management relationship with the owners. Baseball's National Commission first sells the motion picture rights to the World Series for $3,500. When the players demand a share of it, the Commission simply cancels the deal. I guess the owners figured that it was another "all or nothing deal" opportunity to show the players that their rights to demand anything were non-existent. - "Ain't" greed grand!

                                October 5, 1908: Fallout From Yesterday's Tie: Browns Hurt Cleveland Pennant Hopes. With a game to make up after yesterday's controversial 3-3 tie, the St. Louis Browns host the Cleveland Naps in a doubleheader. The Browns end the Naps' pennant hopes with a 3–1 win in the opener. Cleveland takes the 2nd game, 5–3, to end the season with a 90–64 record. If the Tigers win tomorrow, their 90–63 will top Cleveland, whereas if the White Sox win, their 89-63 record will be four points ahead of the Naps. Based on these newly discovered facts (as of this morning), it looks as though that game the Naps "lost" to a controversial tie yesterday may have cost them the pennant.

                                Note: I'm stung by the danger of assumption-error here. Our source does not tell us if the second game that Cleveland won today by a 5-3 score was the result of a new full game - or merely a resumption of that 3-3 tie that ended in controversy yesterday.

                                Today's General Reference Link ... http://www.baseballlibrary.com/baseb...y/OCTOBER5.stm
                                Last edited by Bill_McCurdy; 10-05-2004, 05:35 AM.
                                "Our fans never booed us. - They wouldn't dare. - We outnumbered 'em." ... Browns Pitcher Ned Garver.

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