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  • #16
    Opening Day 1922

    Wednesday, April 12, 1922 Griffith Park Washington, DC
    President Warren G. Harding readies to throw out the
    first pitch of the season. Clyde Milan's Senators would
    defeat the New York Yankees (minus suspended Babe
    Ruth and Bob Meusel) 6-5 in route to a 69-85 sixth
    place finish.

    Brownie 31
    Attached Files

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    • #17
      Monday, April 18, 1938 Griffith Stadium Washington DC
      President Franklin D. Roosevelt throws out the first
      ball of the season as Senators' manager Bucky Harris
      and Connie Mack look on. Harris' Senators would
      defeat Mack's A 12-8 in route to a 75-76 5th place
      finish.

      Brownie31
      Attached Files

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      • #18
        Thanks...

        Originally posted by Brownie31
        Senators great Mickey Vernon is showing holding the
        baseball he belted for his 2000 hit.

        Brownie31
        Admittedly a bit late, but thanks for posting that photo of one of my sentimental favorites. Mickey played in the majors with the Washington Senators (twice), Cleveland Indians (twice), Boston Red Sox, Milwaukee Braves and ended his playing career with the 1960 Pittsburgh Pirates.

        Brought back to Washington in 1961 as a fan favorite to manage the expansion Senators, it was Mickey's misfortune to manage one of the most inept expansion teams ever. After finishing in a 9th place tie with the Kansas City Athletics in 1961, the Senators finished in 10th, all by them selves in 1962. Mickey was fired after 40 games in the 1963 season, probably much to his relief, as the '63 team ended up with a 56-106 record.
        "For the Washington Senators, the worst time of the year is the baseball season." Roger Kahn

        "People ask me what I do in winter when there's no baseball. I'll tell you what I do. I stare out the window and wait for spring." Rogers Hornsby.

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        • #19
          Another couple of links...

          Just found these yesterday...

          http://washingtonsenators.com

          http://washingtonsenators.net

          Make sure to check out the links on the pages themselves-don't miss the story about Sam Rice, who played for the Washington Senators from 1915-1933 and ended his career with 2,987 hits.
          "For the Washington Senators, the worst time of the year is the baseball season." Roger Kahn

          "People ask me what I do in winter when there's no baseball. I'll tell you what I do. I stare out the window and wait for spring." Rogers Hornsby.

          Comment


          • #20
            Be interesting to know how many of the Old washington Senators are still alive.

            Off the top of my head, I can think of Killebrew, Kaat, Ramos, Pascual . . not sure about Mickey Vernon or Roy Seivers

            Comment


            • #21
              Washington Baseball Historical Society

              Originally posted by Jason R. Maier
              Be interesting to know how many of the Old washington Senators are still alive.
              Jason-by "old" Washington Senators, I'm assuming you mean the original team that left for Minnesota after the 1960 season. I'm afraid that's a question I can't answer, however you may be interested in the Washington Baseball Historical Society. Membership is $ 20.00 a year for a quarterly newsletter. You can contact them at:

              Nats News

              9039 Sligo Creek Parkway #1116

              Silver Spring, MD 20901

              (Thanks to JohnGelnarFan for posting this information in another thread.)

              There's also a Washington Senators Yahoo group where you may want to pose your question. You can find it at:

              Washington Senators Yahoo Group
              Last edited by Aa3rt; 11-12-2006, 01:38 PM.
              "For the Washington Senators, the worst time of the year is the baseball season." Roger Kahn

              "People ask me what I do in winter when there's no baseball. I'll tell you what I do. I stare out the window and wait for spring." Rogers Hornsby.

              Comment


              • #22
                Originally posted by Aa3rt
                Admittedly a bit late, but thanks for posting that photo of one of my sentimental favorites. Mickey played in the majors with the Washington Senators (twice), Cleveland Indians (twice), Boston Red Sox, Milwaukee Braves and ended his playing career with the 1960 Pittsburgh Pirates.

                Brought back to Washington in 1961 as a fan favorite to manage the expansion Senators, it was Mickey's misfortune to manage one of the most inept expansion teams ever. After finishing in a 9th place tie with the Kansas City Athletics in 1961, the Senators finished in 10th, all by them selves in 1962. Mickey was fired after 40 games in the 1963 season, probably much to his relief, as the '63 team ended up with a 56-106 record.
                My pleasure! Mickey was succeed by former Dodger star Gil Hodges.

                Brownie31
                Attached Files

                Comment


                • #23
                  Joe Judge, long time Senator first baseman, poses for the Chicago
                  Daily News photographer at Comiskey Park in 1916. Judge's grandson,
                  Mark Gavreau Judge, was the author of "Damn Senators" a 2002 book
                  about his granddad and the 1924 World Series Champion Senators.

                  Brownie31
                  Attached Files

                  Comment


                  • #24
                    Sievers

                    Roy Sieevrs is still alive, living in St. Louis, playing a lot of golf and shows up at our annual Browns' old-timers dinner every once in a while.

                    Originally posted by Jason R. Maier
                    . . not sure about Mickey Vernon or Roy Seivers

                    Comment


                    • #25
                      Originally posted by Brownieand45sfan
                      Roy Sieevrs is still alive, living in St. Louis, playing a lot of golf and shows up at our annual Browns' old-timers dinner every once in a while.
                      Roy Sievers career spanned from 1949-1965 starting with the St. Louis Browns and ending with the expansion Washington Senators. In the interim he played with the original Senators, the Chicago White Sox and the Philadelphia Phillies. Roy has the distinction of being the only player to have played with the St. Louis Browns and both versions of the Washington Senators.

                      Roy Sievers Career Record, Courtesy Baseball-Almanac
                      Last edited by Aa3rt; 11-19-2006, 01:48 PM.
                      "For the Washington Senators, the worst time of the year is the baseball season." Roger Kahn

                      "People ask me what I do in winter when there's no baseball. I'll tell you what I do. I stare out the window and wait for spring." Rogers Hornsby.

                      Comment


                      • #26
                        Ossie!

                        Longtime Senators infielder (and wartime manager) Ossie Bluege stares
                        (and we do mean stares!) into the camera!

                        Brownie31
                        Attached Files

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                        • #27
                          Monday, April 26, 1915 The Polo Grounds New York: Washington Senators manager Clark Griffith is shown in the visitors dugout just prior to his team suffering a 9-2 loss to the New York Yankees. The 1915 Senators would finish in fourth place with an 85-68 record. (Corbis)
                          Attached Files

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                          • #28
                            Man, that coat is something else. And that bat looks exceptionally long, too.

                            I always wonder... are the "die-hard" Senators fans also fans of the new Washington Nationals?

                            Comment


                            • #29
                              Originally posted by bryanac625
                              Man, that coat is something else. And that bat looks exceptionally long, too.

                              I always wonder... are the "die-hard" Senators fans also fans of the new Washington Nationals?
                              The coat was probably made to order. After all, Griffith was manager and owner! Quite a bat too!

                              Brownie31

                              Comment


                              • #30
                                Saturday, April 21, 1917 National Park Washington, DC: A mere nineteen days after the U.S. entry into World War I, Assistant Secretary of the Navy Franklin D. Roosevelt smartly leads the Washington Senators on the field military style. Manager Clark Griffith's Senators would defeat Connie Mack's Philadelphia A's 11-6 en route to a 74-79 fifth place finish.

                                Brownie31
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