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  • 1961 Expansion Team comparison

    The "new" Washington Senators and the Los Angeles Angels entered the American League as expansion teams in 1961.

    I've always had an interest in the Angels and how they fared in competition with the Senators. Here's a comparison of finishes for both expansion teams from 1961-1971.

    1961:

    Los Angeles: W-70, L-91 PCT .435 GB 38.5 8th place
    Washington: W-61, L-100 PCT .379 GB 47.5 9th place*

    *Tied with the Kansas City Athletics

    1962:

    Los Angeles: W-86, L-76 PCT .531 GB 10 3rd place
    Washington: W-60, L-101 PCT .373 GB 35.5 10th place

    1963:

    Los Angeles: W-70, L-91, PCT .435 GB 34 9th place
    Washington: W-56, L-106, PCT .346 GB 48.5 10th place

    1964:

    Los Angeles: W-82, L-80, PCT .506 GB 17 5th place
    Washington: W-62, L-100, PCT .383 GB 37 9th place

    1965:

    California: W-75, L-87, PCT .463 GB 27 7th place
    Washington: W-70, L-92, PCT .432 GB 32 8th place

    1966:

    California: W-80, L-82, PCT .494 GB 18 6th place
    Washington: W-71, L-88 PCT .447 GB 25.5 8th place

    (Red Sox finish ninth 72-90, Yankees finish tenth 70-89)

    1967:

    California: W-84, L-77 PCT .522 GB 7.5 5th place
    Washington: W-76, L-85 PCT .472 GB 15.5 6th place

    1968:

    California: W-67, L-95 PCT .414 GB 36 8th place (tied with Chicago)
    Washington: W-65, L-96 PCT .404 GB 37.5 10th place

    1969:

    Washington: W-86, L-76 PCT .531 GB 23 4th place AL East
    California: W-71, L-91 PCT .438 GB 26 3rd place AL West

    1970:

    California: W-86, L-76 PCT .531 GB 12 3rd place AL West
    Washington: W-70, L-92 PCT .432 GB 38 6th place AL East

    1971:

    California: W-76, L-86 PCT .469 GB 25.5 4th place AL West
    Washington W-63, L-96 PCT .396 GB 38.5 5 place AL East

    Overall, with the exception of that memorable 1969 season, the Angels fared better than the Senators in 10 of 11 seasons. h

    Head-to-head:

    Washington vs. LA/California: (I'll simply list wins/losses for each season)

    1961: Wash: W-8, L-10
    1962: Wash: W-7, L-11
    1963: Wash: W-9, L-9
    1964: Wash: W-8, L-10
    1965: Wash: W-12, L-6
    1966: Wash: W-11, L-7
    1967: Wash: W-12, L-6
    1968: Wash: W-6, L-12
    1969: Wash: W-7, L-5
    1970: Wash: W-5, L-7
    1971: Wash: W-8, L-4

    I suppose if someone wanted to take this a little further a comparison against the 1969 expansion teams, the Kansas City Royals and the Seattle Pilots/Milwaukee Brewers may also be of interest.

    The one thing I remember is that the Seattle Pilots went 7-5 against the Senators in 1969, the Pilots only winning record against any opposing club! h

    Probably a topic more appropriate for the Los Angeles/California/Anaheim* forum-how did the Angels manage to fare so well in 1962 (86-76, 3rd place finish) in only their second season?

    *=whatever they're calling themselves this season.

    If I remember correctly, the Angels, being the only west coast American League team, had to share travel expenses with all teams travelling to California until 1968 when the Athletics abandoned Kansas City for Oakland.

    Players who spent time with both the original Senators and the Angels:

    Ken Aspromonte
    Julio Becquer*
    Rocky Bridges
    Tex Clevenger*
    Billy Consolo
    Lenny Green
    Don Lee*
    Tom Morgan*
    Albie Pearson
    Jack Spring*
    Faye Throneberry
    Eddie Yost

    Players with the expansion Senators and the Angels:

    George Brunet*
    Ryne Duren*
    Ken Hamlin
    Ken Hunt
    Ron Kline*
    Ron Moeller*
    Jimmy Piersall
    Rick Reichardt

    *=pitchers
    Last edited by Aa3rt; 07-15-2006, 09:13 AM.
    "For the Washington Senators, the worst time of the year is the baseball season." Roger Kahn

    "People ask me what I do in winter when there's no baseball. I'll tell you what I do. I stare out the window and wait for spring." Rogers Hornsby.

  • #2
    I find it interesting that the Senators won the head to head series 93-87.

    Welcome back ARod. Hope you are a Yankee forever.
    Phil Rizzuto-a Yankee forever.

    Holy Cow

    Comment


    • #3
      Senators-Angels in 1962

      Nice work Art. It is an interesting comparison and you can see that the front office had different approaches to building a team. There wasn't necessarily a great difference in the average age of players on each team but the Angels had more success in 1962 with their set lineup and promising pitching staff.

      The homerun production was almost equal and the team average for both was .250 but the Angels outscored the Senators,718 to 499. Obviously,clutch hitting favored the Angels. Washington only had Chuck Hinton(75) and 32 year old first baseman,Harry Bright with as many as 67 RBI's while the Angels had 5 players with at least 60. Leon Wagner(107) and Lee Thomas(104) paced the team while Billy Moran and Felix Torres each drove in 74. Catcher Bob Rodgers pitched in 61 run scoring hits. Hinton scored 73 times for Washington and Bob Johnson followed him with 58. Los Angeles had 5 players that scored at least 65 times,led by Albie Pearson's league leading 115. The Senators led the league with 99 stolen bases but they were left stranded all to often.

      The Angels had a much better pitching staff. Their 3.70 ERA tied for second in the league. Only Baltimore(3.69) and New York(3.70) were their equal. The Angels were led by talented 21 year old,Dean Chance. He pitched in 50 games,won 14,had 8 saves and a 2.98 ERA. Ken McBride won 11 games and Bo Belinsky had his best year with 10 wins and a no-hitter. Ted Bowsfield,Eli Grba and Don Lee pitched in with 9,8 and 8 wins. The Angels starters led the league with 15 shutouts and the bullpen led the major leagues with 47 saves. The solid bullpen received strong seasons from Dan Osinski(2.83),Tom Morgan(2.90),39 year old Art Fowler(2.81) and 1962 Mets castoff,Bob "Butterball" Botz(3.43)

      The Senators team ERA of 4.04 was 7th in the league and led by Dave Stenhouse(11-12,3.65),Don Rudolph(8-10,3.63),22 year old Claude Osteen(8-13,3.66) and Tom Cheney(7-9,3.17). Bennie Daniels who was 12-11 with a 3.44 ERA in 1961 slumped to 7-16 and 4.86. The starters pitched respectably and were tied for 4th in the league with 11 shutouts.
      The bullpen was one of the main reasons that the Senators ended with a 60-101 record. Jim Hannan was 2-4 with a 3.31 and led the team with 4 saves. Only Ed Hobaugh(3.78) and Steve Hamilton(3.79) had ERA's below Marty Kutyna's 4.04.The relief staff was last in the league with only 13 saves. Second place Minnesota was 9th and they had 27 saves.

      The Senators overhauled their offensive lineup for 1963 and only Chuck Hinton,Jim King,Chuck Cottier and Ken Retzer were in the starting lineup. It didn't help as the team batting average fell to .227
      The pitching staff had many of the same faces. Osteen and Cheney had respectable seasons but no one won as many 10 games. The bullpen was led by new ace Ron Kline who pitched in 62 games,saved 17 and had an ERA of 2.78. Unfortunately,only Ed Roebuck(3.32),who joined the team in July and pitched in only 20 games,had an ERA under 4.29.That belonged to Art Quick who pitched in 7 games but just 4 in relief. The entire staff ERA rose to 4.42 and the team record fell to 56-106. The Senators lost 100 games again in 1964 but it would be for the last time.
      Last edited by JohnGelnarFan; 07-15-2006, 11:06 AM.

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by Aa3rt
        The "new" Washington Senators and the Los Angeles Angels entered the American League as expansion teams in 1961.

        I've always had an interest in the Angels and how they fared in competition with the Senators. Here's a comparison of finishes for both expansion teams from 1961-1971.

        1961:

        Los Angeles: W-70, L-91 PCT .435 GB 38.5 8th place
        Washington: W-61, L-100 PCT .379 GB 47.5 9th place*

        *Tied with the Kansas City Athletics

        1962:

        Los Angeles: W-86, L-76 PCT .531 GB 10 3rd place
        Washington: W-60, L-101 PCT .373 GB 35.5 10th place

        1963:

        Los Angeles: W-70, L-91, PCT .435 GB 34 9th place
        Washington: W-56, L-106, PCT .346 GB 48.5 10th place

        1964:

        Los Angeles: W-82, L-80, PCT .506 GB 17 5th place
        Washington: W-62, L-100, PCT .383 GB 37 9th place

        1965:

        California: W-75, L-87, PCT .463 GB 27 7th place
        Washington: W-70, L-92, PCT .432 GB 32 8th place

        1966:

        California: W-80, L-82, PCT .494 GB 18 6th place
        Washington: W-71, L-88 PCT .447 GB 25.5 8th place

        (Red Sox finish ninth 72-90, Yankees finish tenth 70-89)

        1967:

        California: W-84, L-77 PCT .522 GB 7.5 5th place
        Washington: W-76, L-85 PCT .472 GB 15.5 6th place

        1968:

        California: W-67, L-95 PCT .414 GB 36 8th place (tied with Chicago)
        Washington: W-65, L-96 PCT .404 GB 37.5 10th place

        1969:

        Washington: W-86, L-76 PCT .531 GB 23 4th place AL East
        California: W-71, L-91 PCT .438 GB 26 3rd place AL West

        1970:

        California: W-86, L-76 PCT .531 GB 12 3rd place AL West
        Washington: W-70, L-92 PCT .432 GB 38 6th place AL East

        1971:

        California: W-76, L-86 PCT .469 GB 25.5 4th place AL West
        Washington W-63, L-96 PCT .396 GB 38.5 5 place AL East

        Overall, with the exception of that memorable 1969 season, the Angels fared better than the Senators in 10 of 11 seasons. h

        Head-to-head:

        Washington vs. LA/California: (I'll simply list wins/losses for each season)

        1961: Wash: W-8, L-10
        1962: Wash: W-7, L-11
        1963: Wash: W-9, L-9
        1964: Wash: W-8, L-10
        1965: Wash: W-12, L-6
        1966: Wash: W-11, L-7
        1967: Wash: W-12, L-6
        1968: Wash: W-6, L-12
        1969: Wash: W-7, L-5
        1970: Wash: W-5, L-7
        1971: Wash: W-8, L-4

        I suppose if someone wanted to take this a little further a comparison against the 1969 expansion teams, the Kansas City Royals and the Seattle Pilots/Milwaukee Brewers may also be of interest.

        The one thing I remember is that the Seattle Pilots went 7-5 against the Senators in 1969, the Pilots only winning record against any opposing club! h

        Probably a topic more appropriate for the Los Angeles/California/Anaheim* forum-how did the Angels manage to fare so well in 1962 (86-76, 3rd place finish) in only their second season?

        *=whatever they're calling themselves this season.

        If I remember correctly, the Angels, being the only west coast American League team, had to share travel expenses with all teams travelling to California until 1968 when the Athletics abandoned Kansas City for Oakland.

        Players who spent time with both the original Senators and the Angels:

        Ken Aspromonte
        Julio Becquer*
        Rocky Bridges
        Tex Clevenger*
        Billy Consolo
        Lenny Green
        Don Lee*
        Tom Morgan*
        Albie Pearson
        Jack Spring*
        Faye Throneberry
        Eddie Yost

        Players with the expansion Senators and the Angels:

        George Brunet*
        Ryne Duren*
        Ken Hamlin
        Ken Hunt
        Ron Kline*
        Ron Moeller*
        Jimmy Piersall
        Rick Reichardt

        *=pitchers
        Very interesting. What came to my attention is that 3 out of the four expansion clubs that started in 1969 made the World Series before the Angels did (the Expos might have won it all in 1994). What boggles my mind is that fact that the Marlins have already won two. The expansion Senators/Rangers have had a similar history to the Angels. The World Series changed the Angels, otherwise the two clubs would be the same. If the Rangers go to the World Series, their historical problems will probably go away as well. The Angels still haven't had more than two seasons in a row over .500 (a winning record this year will change that) and last year was the first time they won the division two times in a row. I don't know what kind of owner Bob Short was in Washington but Gene Autry, although beloved, was not a good owner in my estimation. :atthepc

        Comment


        • #5
          Great research and writeup, JGF!

          Originally posted by CaliforniaCajun
          I don't know what kind of owner Bob Short was in Washington but Gene Autry, although beloved, was not a good owner in my estimation. :atthepc
          IIRC, Bob :grouchy Short was actually the third owner of the expansion Senators during their stay in Washington. The first group was headed by a retired general named Pete Quesada. (Don't know why I still remember that after all these years.) After two or three years the ownership group changed. It's all kind of fuzzy now. Bob Short took over between 1968 & 1969. He had his eyes on Texas from the beginning, having the team playing exhibition games there in 1969 and 1970 before coming north to DC.
          Last edited by Aa3rt; 07-20-2006, 09:05 PM.
          "For the Washington Senators, the worst time of the year is the baseball season." Roger Kahn

          "People ask me what I do in winter when there's no baseball. I'll tell you what I do. I stare out the window and wait for spring." Rogers Hornsby.

          Comment


          • #6
            The majority owner of the Senators was James Johnston (sp?) who had founded a Johnston, Lemon & Company -- the largest investment bank in DC at the time (which I think stilll exists). He later gave a lot of money to UNC Chapel Hill.

            What Robert Short did would be called a leverage buy out (LBO) these days. He put very little of his own money and instead either 1) borrowed the funds or 2) sold televsion and other rights to generate cash.

            I've had a discussion with some lawyers back in the early 80s who told me that both Johnston and WTOP (which had the broadcast rights) could have sued Short to block the move to Texas as Short was late in payments to Johnston and WTOP actually owned the broadccast rights Short was trying to sell in Texas. However, neither chose to pursue this action.

            Comment


            • #7
              That's shocking TI. I had no idea and I wish they had. I guess they thought the losses would continue to grow. Maybe that would have made Short sell the team to someone that wanted to keep the Senators in the nation's capitol. What a thing to find out after 35 years! h

              Comment


              • #8
                A little background...

                From Washington's Expansion Senators (1961-1971 by James R. Hartley, copyright 1997, 1998, published by Corduroy Press:

                (This is that boring transaction stuff that I've never really paid attention to before.)

                1960

                October 26-American League awarded 2 new franchises to Los Angeles and Minneapolis. Calvin Griffith moved the Washington Senators to Minneapolis. American League awarded a new franchise to Washington.

                (Personal aside-This is the move that broke my maternal grandfather's heart-he was a Senators fan and admired Walter Johnson. He lost his interest in baseball after the 1960 season. Being a 7 year old at the time, I didn't understand the difference and became a fan of the expansion Senators.)

                November 17-American League expansion franchise in Washington awarded to "The Senators, Inc." headed by General Elwood R. "Pete" Quesada (Administrator with the Federal Aviation Administration.) Other investors: Katherine Graham (Washington Post), Floyd Akers (Chairman of the D. C. Armory Board), George Bunker (Chairman of Martin Aircraft), George A. Garrett (former ambassador to Ireland), James M. Johnston, James H. Lemon, Robert Levi, George Sweeterman and George Y. Wheeler.

                1963

                January 29-Accepted the resignation of team president Elwood R. "Pete" Quesada. Shares of "The Senators, Inc" owned by General Elwood Quesada, Katherine Graham, George Garrett, Robert Levi and George Wheeler were purchased by James Johnston, Jim H. Lemon and George Bunker. Johnston was elected Chairman of the Board of Directors.

                1965

                January 5-James M. Johnston and James H. Lemon purchased the shares of the other stockholders of "The Senators, Inc."

                1968

                January 3-Appointed James H. Lemon as Chairman of the Board of Directors to the Senators, Inc.

                December 3-Robert E. Short purchased The Senators for $9.4 million from James H. Lemon and the estate of James Johnston. Lemon retained 10% of the team.

                December 5-The American League approved the sale of the Senators to Robert Short.

                1971

                September 21-The American League owners voted 10-2 to allow Bob Short to move the Senators to Arlington, Texas for the 1972 season.

                From a writeup on the 1969 season, same reference: "The Senators wound up their exhibition season with two games against the Pittsburgh Pirates in Arlington, Texas. The games were originally scheduled for Louisville, Kentucky, but the field was deemed unsuitable for play. Bob Short recommended Arlington, and the Pirates agreed to the change in venue."

                The Senators would again play two exhibition games in Texas in 1970 against the Montreal Expos before heading to Washington for the home opener.

                Interestingly, in 1971, they played two exhibition games against the Oakland Athletics in Birmingham, Alabama.

                However, I find it most interesting that only four months after taking over the team, Short had already scheduled exhibition games in Texas. Regardless of the conditions of the field in Louisville, I STILL maintain that Short started counting that Texas oil money the day he took over the team.
                "For the Washington Senators, the worst time of the year is the baseball season." Roger Kahn

                "People ask me what I do in winter when there's no baseball. I'll tell you what I do. I stare out the window and wait for spring." Rogers Hornsby.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Thanks for the info Aa3rt!

                  A quick calcullation shows that $9.4MM in 1968 is about $55MM in today's dolllars. And according to Forbes, the Rangers are worth about $353MM (but that includes the stadium which is about $100MM).

                  I wonder what Short got for selling the team?

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    That's a good question TI. I wonder if that information is available? Aa3rt,you and I won't stump each other too often.We both have Jim Hartley's book!

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      First Hispanic owner?

                      Originally posted by Aa3rt
                      From Washington's Expansion Senators (1961-1971 by James R. Hartley, copyright 1997, 1998, published by Corduroy Press:

                      (This is that boring transaction stuff that I've never really paid attention to before.)

                      1960

                      October 26-American League awarded 2 new franchises to Los Angeles and Minneapolis. Calvin Griffith moved the Washington Senators to Minneapolis. American League awarded a new franchise to Washington.

                      (Personal aside-This is the move that broke my maternal grandfather's heart-he was a Senators fan and admired Walter Johnson. He lost his interest in baseball after the 1960 season. Being a 7 year old at the time, I didn't understand the difference and became a fan of the expansion Senators.)

                      November 17-American League expansion franchise in Washington awarded to "The Senators, Inc." headed by General Elwood R. "Pete" Quesada (Administrator with the Federal Aviation Administration.) Other investors: Katherine Graham (Washington Post), Floyd Akers (Chairman of the D. C. Armory Board), George Bunker (Chairman of Martin Aircraft), George A. Garrett (former ambassador to Ireland), James M. Johnston, James H. Lemon, Robert Levi, George Sweeterman and George Y. Wheeler.

                      1963

                      January 29-Accepted the resignation of team president Elwood R. "Pete" Quesada. Shares of "The Senators, Inc" owned by General Elwood Quesada, Katherine Graham, George Garrett, Robert Levi and George Wheeler were purchased by James Johnston, Jim H. Lemon and George Bunker. Johnston was elected Chairman of the Board of Directors.

                      1965

                      January 5-James M. Johnston and James H. Lemon purchased the shares of the other stockholders of "The Senators, Inc."

                      1968

                      January 3-Appointed James H. Lemon as Chairman of the Board of Directors to the Senators, Inc.

                      December 3-Robert E. Short purchased The Senators for $9.4 million from James H. Lemon and the estate of James Johnston. Lemon retained 10% of the team.

                      December 5-The American League approved the sale of the Senators to Robert Short.

                      1971

                      September 21-The American League owners voted 10-2 to allow Bob Short to move the Senators to Arlington, Texas for the 1972 season.

                      From a writeup on the 1969 season, same reference: "The Senators wound up their exhibition season with two games against the Pittsburgh Pirates in Arlington, Texas. The games were originally scheduled for Louisville, Kentucky, but the field was deemed unsuitable for play. Bob Short recommended Arlington, and the Pirates agreed to the change in venue."

                      The Senators would again play two exhibition games in Texas in 1970 against the Montreal Expos before heading to Washington for the home opener.

                      Interestingly, in 1971, they played two exhibition games against the Oakland Athletics in Birmingham, Alabama.

                      However, I find it most interesting that only four months after taking over the team, Short had already scheduled exhibition games in Texas. Regardless of the conditions of the field in Louisville, I STILL maintain that Short started counting that Texas oil money the day he took over the team.
                      Arte Moreno is being touted as MLB's first Hispanic owner when he bought the Angels in 2003. If the 1961 Senators were owned by Pete Quesada, wouldn't he have been the first Hispanic owner?

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by CaliforniaCajun
                        Arte Moreno is being touted as MLB's first Hispanic owner when he bought the Angels in 2003. If the 1961 Senators were owned by Pete Quesada, wouldn't he have been the first Hispanic owner?
                        According to this biography Pete Quesada was the son of a Spanish businessman and an Irish-American mother.

                        The definitions I've read say that "Hispanic" denotes someone of Spanish origin from Central and South America and the Carribean.
                        "For the Washington Senators, the worst time of the year is the baseball season." Roger Kahn

                        "People ask me what I do in winter when there's no baseball. I'll tell you what I do. I stare out the window and wait for spring." Rogers Hornsby.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          You're a credit to Senators fans everywhere Art! Great research!

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Great work, Art ...

                            But even the one year the Senators had a better record, the Angels still finished higher in the standings (thanks only to the new-fangled division structure). What a revolting development for Senator fans.

                            Originally posted by Aa3rt

                            1961:

                            Los Angeles: W-70, L-91 PCT .435 GB 38.5 8th place
                            Washington: W-61, L-100 PCT .379 GB 47.5 9th place*

                            *Tied with the Kansas City Athletics

                            1962:

                            Los Angeles: W-86, L-76 PCT .531 GB 10 3rd place
                            Washington: W-60, L-101 PCT .373 GB 35.5 10th place

                            1963:

                            Los Angeles: W-70, L-91, PCT .435 GB 34 9th place
                            Washington: W-56, L-106, PCT .346 GB 48.5 10th place

                            1964:

                            Los Angeles: W-82, L-80, PCT .506 GB 17 5th place
                            Washington: W-62, L-100, PCT .383 GB 37 9th place

                            1965:

                            California: W-75, L-87, PCT .463 GB 27 7th place
                            Washington: W-70, L-92, PCT .432 GB 32 8th place

                            1966:

                            California: W-80, L-82, PCT .494 GB 18 6th place
                            Washington: W-71, L-88 PCT .447 GB 25.5 8th place

                            (Red Sox finish ninth 72-90, Yankees finish tenth 70-89)

                            1967:

                            California: W-84, L-77 PCT .522 GB 7.5 5th place
                            Washington: W-76, L-85 PCT .472 GB 15.5 6th place

                            1968:

                            California: W-67, L-95 PCT .414 GB 36 8th place (tied with Chicago)
                            Washington: W-65, L-96 PCT .404 GB 37.5 10th place

                            1969:

                            Washington: W-86, L-76 PCT .531 GB 23 4th place AL East
                            California: W-71, L-91 PCT .438 GB 26 3rd place AL West

                            1970:

                            California: W-86, L-76 PCT .531 GB 12 3rd place AL West
                            Washington: W-70, L-92 PCT .432 GB 38 6th place AL East

                            1971:

                            California: W-76, L-86 PCT .469 GB 25.5 4th place AL West
                            Washington W-63, L-96 PCT .396 GB 38.5 5 place AL East

                            Overall, with the exception of that memorable 1969 season, the Angels fared better than the Senators in 10 of 11 seasons. h

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Angels owner Gene Autry, who made millions singing Rudolph The Red Nose Rainedeer and staring in two-reeler westerns (and maybe making a few good investments to boot), tried for years to buy a championship team. At least he succeeded in producing winning records.

                              Meanwhile, Washington was stuck with one lousey owner after another. In the early 1970's I happened to attend a Twins-Rangers game in Bloomington Minn. It was a chance to see both of my long lost teams compete. Killebrew was still the star (if aging one at that) of the Twins.

                              The PA announcer let us know early in the game that Twins owner Calvin Griffith was hosting his good friend, Ranger owner Bob Short, and they were seated directly behind the Rangers dugout. It so happens, that was maybe 10 rows immediately in front of me.

                              I'm not an evil person. I don't know why during that game I kept having the reoccuring thought: 'If only I had an stick of dynomite'.

                              Comment

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